Physiology & breeding 

Understanding and improving crop photosynthesis Edited by Dr Robert Sharwood 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 General 
1.Understanding the biochemistry of C₃ photosynthesis in crop plants: Christine Raines, University of Essex, UK 
2.Understanding the genetics of C₃ photosynthesis in crop plants: Nelson Saibo, ITQB-New University of Lisbon, Portugal 
 
Part 2 Improving photosynthesis: light harvesting 
3.Understanding the relationship between photosynthesis and the circadian clock in plants: Matt Jones, University of Glasgow, UK 
4.Modifying the photosystem antenna complex to improve light harvesting for photosynthesis in crops: Min Chen, University of Sydney, Australia 
5.Relaxing non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) to improve photosynthesis in crops: Johannes Kromdijk, University of Cambridge, UK 
6.Modifying mesophyll conductance to optimise photosynthesis in crops: Tory Clarke, Australian National University, Australia 
7.Modifying leaf/canopy architecture to optimise photosynthesis in crops: Elizabeth Ainsworth, University of Illinois, USA 
 
Part 3 Improving photosynthesis: optimising chloroplast function/light conversion 
8.Modifying photorespiration to optimise photosynthesis in crops: Berkley Walker, Michigan State University, USA 
9.Maximising the efficiency of RuBP (ribulose biphosphate) regeneration to optimise photosynthesis in crops: Thomas Sharkey, Michigan State University, USA 
10.Understanding and modifying protein function in plant chloroplasts to optimise photosynthesis: James Moroney, Louisiana State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781801461290 ¦ Pub date: December 2022 ¦ Extent: 400 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in seed science and technology for more sustainable crop production Edited by Dr Julia Buitink and Professor Olivier LePrince 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Understanding seeds: from biology to the field 
1.Seed dormancy and germination: a critical update: Henk W. M. Hilhorst, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands and University of Cape Town, South Africa 
2.Understanding the effects of maternal environment in controlling seed dormancy: Roberto L. Benech-Arnold, Cátedra de Cultivos Industriales, IFEVAFacultad de Agronomía (CONICET/UBA), Argentina; M. Verónica Rodríguez, Cátedra de Fisiología Vegetal, IFEVA-Facultad de Agronomía (CONICET/UBA), Argentina; Diego Batlla, Cátedra de Cerealicultura, IFEVA-Facultad de Agronomía (CONICET/UBA), Argentina; and Rocío Fernández Farnocchia, Cátedra de Cultivos Industriales, IFEVA-Facultad de Agronomía (CONICET/UBA), Argentina 
3.Applying population-based threshold models to quantify and improve seed quality attributes: Kent J. Bradford and Pedro Bello, University of California-Davis, USA 
4.Biotic sources of seed losses influencing germination and emergence success in crop plants and agricultural weeds: James W. Dalling and Adam S. Davis, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA 
5.Advances in understanding the genetic and environmental factors determining seed longevity: Julia Buitink and Olivier Leprince, Institut Agro, Univ Angers, INRAE, IRHS, France 
 
Part 2 Seed quality control and treatment 
6.Advances in seed phenotyping using X-ray imaging: Sherif Hamdy, Aurélie Charrier and Laurence Le Corre, GEVES, France; Pejman Rasti, Université d’Angers and École d’ingénieur Informatique et Environnement (ESAIP), France; and David Rousseau, Université d’Angers, France 
7.Advances in testing seed health: Peter Bonants, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
8.Advances in preservation of seed vigour during storage: Fiona R. Hay, Aarhus University, Denmark 
9.Enhancing seed defence mechanisms against pathogens: John Hampton, Bio-Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University, New Zealand 
10.Advances in seed priming techniques: Henry Bruggink, Incotec Europe, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786769176 ¦ Pub date: July 2022 ¦ Extent: 368 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in plant phenotyping for more sustainable crop production Edited by Professor Achim Walter 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 The development of phenotyping as a research field 
1.Origins and drivers of crop phenotyping: Roland Pieruschka and Ulrich Schurr, Institute for Bio- and Geosciences (IBG), IBG-2: Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany 
2.The evolution of trait selection in breeding: from seeing to remote sensing: Matthew Reynolds, Francisco Pinto, Liana Acevedo, Francisco J. Pinera-Chavez, and Carolina Rivera-Amado, International Maize and Wheat Research Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
 
Part 2 Sensor types 
3.Advances in optical analysis for crop phenotyping: Jian Jin and Tanzeel U. Rehman, Purdue University, USA; and Qin Zhang, Washington State University, USA 
4.Advances in the use of thermography in crop phenotyping: David M. Deery, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
5.Advances in the use of X-ray computed tomography in crop phenotyping: Stefan Gerth, Norman Uhlmann and Michael Salamon, Fraunhofer EZRT, Germany 
 
Part 3 Carrier/delivery systems 
6.Field robots for plant phenotyping: Rick van de Zedde, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
7.Advances in the use of aerial systems/UAVs for crop phenotyping as examples for lean, low-cost, high-throughput field crop phenotyping systems: Helge Aasen, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zurich and Remote Sensing Team, Division of Agroecology and Environment, Agroscope, Switzerland; and Lukas Roth, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
 
Part 4 Data analysis 
8.Meeting computer vision and machine learning challenges in crop phenotyping: Hanno Scharr, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences: Plant Sciences (IBG-2) and Institute for Advanced Simulation: Data Analytics and Machine Learning (IAS-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany; and Sotirios A. Tsaftaris, The University of Edinburgh and Alan Turing Institute, UK 
9.Digital phenotyping and genotype-to-phenotype(G2P) models to predict complex traits in cereal crops: Nicolas Virlet, Rothamsted Research, UK; Danilo H. Lyra, Biometrics and Breeding Research, BASF, Belgium; and Malcolm J. Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK 
10.The role of crop growth models in crop improvement: integrating phenomics, envirotyping and genomic prediction: Jana Kholová, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India; Amir Hajjarpoor, UMR DIADE, Université de Montpellier, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), France; Vincent Garin, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Mali; William Nelson, Gottingen University, Germany; Madina Diacoumba, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Mali; Carlos D. Messina, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, USA; Graeme L. Hammer, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation - The University of Queensland, Australia; Yunbi Xu, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China and International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico; Milan O. Urban, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia; and Jan Jarolímek, Czech University of Life Sciences (CZU), Czech Republic 
 
Part 5 Case studies 
11.Using phenotyping techniques to analyse crop functionality and photosynthesis: Eva Rosenqvist, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
12.Using phenotyping techniques to predict and model grain yield: translating phenotyping into genetic gain: Thomas Vatter and José L. Araus, University of Barcelona and AGROTECNIO (Center for Research in Agrotechnology), Spain 
13.Automated assessment of plant diseases and traits by sensors: how can digital technologies support smart farming and plant breeding?: Anne-Katrin Mahlein, Institute of Sugar Beet Research, Germany; Jan Behmann, Bayer Crop Science, Germany; David Bohnenkamp, BASF Digital Farming GmbH, Germany; René H. J. Heim, UAV Research Centre (URC), Ghent University, Belgium; and Sebastian Streit and Stefan Paulus, Institute of Sugar Beet Research, Germany 
ISBN: 9781786768568 ¦ Pub date: June 2022 ¦ Extent: 404 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Genome editing for precision crop breeding Edited by Dr Matthew R. Willmann 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Genome editing techniques 
1.Using TALENs for genome editing in plants: Hilal Betul Kaya, Manisa Celal Bayar University, Turkey; Rhitu Rai, ICAR-National Institute for Plant Biotechnology, India; and Adam J. Bogdanove, Cornell University, USA 
2.Double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in plants and their application in genome engineering: Natalja Beying, Carla Schmidt and Holger Puchta, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany 
3.Advances in the generation of insertion-based genome edits in plants: Baike Wang and Juan Wang, Institute of Horticulture Crops – Xinjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Shaoyong Huang, Institute of Horticulture Crops – Xinjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences and College of Forestry and Horticulture – Xinjiang Agricultural University, China; and Yaping Tang, Ning Li, Shengbao Yang, Tao Yang and Qinghui Yu, Institute of Horticulture Crops – Xinjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
4.Viruses as vectors for the delivery of gene-editing reagents: Evan E. Ellison, James C. Chamness and Daniel F. Voytas, University of Minnesota, USA 
5.Progress in precise and predictable genome editing in plants with base editing: Sabine Fräbel, Shai J. Lawit, Jingyi Nie, David G. Schwark, Thomas J. Poorten and Nathaniel D. Graham, Pairwise Plants, USA 
6.Advances in guide RNA design for editing plant genomes using CRISPR-Cas systems: Kaiyuan Chen, Hao Liu and Kabin Xie, Huazhong Agricultural University, China; Muhammad Tahir ul Qamar and Ling-Ling Chen, Huazhong Agricultural University, and Guangxi University, China 
7.Advances in assembling gRNA/Cas9 constructs in genome editing of plants: Marta Vázquez Vilar, Sara Selma, Asun Fernández del Carmen and Diego Orzáez, Instituto de Biología Molecular and Celular de Plantas de Valencia (CSIC-UPV), Spain 
8.Strategies for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing: from delivery to production of modified plants: William Gordon-Kamm, Pierluigi Barone, Sergei Svitashev, Jeffry D. Sander, Sandeep Kumar and Todd Jones, Corteva Agriscience, USA 
9.Advances in screening plants for edits and off-targets: Chun Wang and Kejian Wang, China National Rice Research Institute, China 
10.Targeted modification of promoters: Andika Gunadi and Ning Zhang, Boyce Thompson Institute, USA; and John J. Finer, The Ohio State University, USA 
11.The regulation of genome-edited crops: Gregory Jaffe, Center for Science in the Public Interest, USA 
 
Part 2 Applications 
12.Genome editing of barley: Martin Becker, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany; and Goetz Hensel, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany, and Palacký University, Czech Republic 
13.Genome editing of maize: Jacob D. Zobrist, Morgan McCaw, Minjeong Kang, Alan L. Eggenberger, Keunsub Lee, and Kan Wang, Iowa State University, USA 
14.Genome editing of sorghum: Aixia Li, Shandong University, China; and David R. Holding, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
15.CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in Brassica: Cheng Dai, Xia Tian and Chaozhi Ma, Huazhong Agricultural University, China 
16.Genome editing of tomatoes and other Solanaceae: Joyce Van Eck, The Boyce Thompson Institute and Cornell University, USA 
17.Genome editing of woody perennial trees: Chung-Jui Tsai, University of Georgia, USA 
ISBN: 9781786764478 ¦ Pub date: April 2021 ¦ Extent: 494 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Plant genetic resources: A review of current research and future needs Edited by Dr M. Ehsan Dulloo 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Importance and value of conservation and use of plant genetic diversity 
1.Plant genetic resources for food and agriculture for sustainable development: Chikelu Mba, Seeds and Plant Genetic Resources Team – Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Italy; M. Ehsan Dulloo, Bioversity International, Italy; and Kent Nnadozie, Secretariat of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture – Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Italy 
2.Valuing plant genetic resources in genebanks: Past, present and future: Melinda Smale, Michigan State University, USA; and Nelissa Jamora and Luigi Guarino, Global Crop Diversity Trust, Germany 
3.Monitoring plant genetic resources for food and agriculture: M. Ehsan Dulloo, Bioversity International, Italy; Prishnee Bissessur, Bioversity International, Mauritius; and Jai Rana, Bioversity International, India 
4.Improving the global exchange of germplasm for crop breeding: Selim Louafi, UMR AGAP Institut, CIRAD, University of Montpellier, INRAE, Institut Agro, Montpellier, France; and Eric Welch, Arizona State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Protecting plant genetic diversity: in-situ and on-farm strategies 
5.Key steps in conservation and use of plant genetic resources: an overview: Nigel Maxted and Joana Magos Brehm, University of Birmingham, UK 
6.Key issues facing genebanks in preserving crop genetic diversity ex situ: overview of the range of challenges: Paula Bramel, formally Crop Trust, Germany 
7.Techniques and key issues in collecting crop wild relatives: Michael Way, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK 
8.New technologies to improve the ex situ conservation of plant genetic resources: Fiona R. Hay, Aarhus University, Denmark; and Sershen, University of the Western Cape & Institute of Natural Resources, South Africa 
9.The role of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in preserving crop genetic diversity: Åsmund Asdal, Nordic Genetic Resource Centre (NordGen), Sweden 
 
Part 3 Enhancing conservation and use of plant genetic diversity 
10.Community-based conservation of crop genetic resources: Stef de Haan, International Potato Center (CIP), Peru 
11.Participatory plant breeding programs to optimize use of crop genetic resources: Margaret Smith, Cornell University, USA; and J. C. Dawson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA 
12.Seed systems and diversity: Niels Louwaars, Plantum and Wageningen University, Law Group, The Netherlands 
13.DNA-based screening of Brassica germplasm for sustainable and enhanced crop production: Yueqi Zhang, The University of Western Australia, Australia; Ting Xiang Neik, Sunway College Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and Junrey C. Amas, Aldrin Y. Cantila, Nur Shuhadah Mohd Saad, Tingting Wu and Jacqueline Batley, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786764515 ¦ Pub date: March 2021 ¦ Extent: 352 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Understanding and improving crop root function Edited by Emeritus Professor Peter J. Gregory 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Analysing root system architecture, growth and interactions with the rhizosphere 
1.Advances in root architectural modeling: Johannes A. Postma, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany; and Christopher K. Black, The Pennsylania State University, USA 
2.The development of crop root architecture and optimization of nutrition acquisition: the case of rice: Wei Xuan, Nanjing Agricultural University, China; Yuanming Xie, Nanjing Agricultural University, China and Ghent University and VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology, Belgium; and Tom Beeckman, Ghent University and VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology, Belgium 
3.Advances in understanding plant root growth regulators: Findimila Dio Ishaya and Amanda Rasmussen, University of Nottingham, UK 
4.Advances in understanding plant root anatomy and nutrient acquisition: Dimitris L. Bouranis and Styliani N. Chorianopoulou, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece 
5.Advances in understanding plant root hairs in relation to nutrient acquisition and crop root function: Timothy S. George and Lawrie K. Brown, The James Hutton Institute, UK; and A. Glyn Bengough, University of Dundee, UK 
6.Understanding plant-root interactions with rhizobacteria to improve biological nitrogen fixation in crops: Ulrike Mathesius, Australian National University, Australia; Jian Jin, La Trobe University, Australia and Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Yansheng Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and Michelle Watt, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Germany and University of Melbourne, Australia 
7.Advances in understanding arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal effects on soil nutrient cycling: Haiyang Zhang and Jeff R. Powell, Western Sydney University, Australia 
 
Part 2 Root response to biotic threats 
8.Advances in understanding plant root response to weedy root parasites: M. Fernández-Aparicio and D. Rubiales, CSIC, Spain 
9.Advances in understanding plant root responses to root-feeding insects: Scott N. Johnson, Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment – Western Sydney University, Australia; and Ximena Cibils-Stewart, Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment – Western Sydney University, Australia and Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuaria (INIA), Uruguay 
10.Advances in understanding plant root response to nematode attack: Shahid Siddique, University of California-Davis, USA; and John T. Jones, The James Hutton Institute and University of St Andrews, UK 
 
Part 3 Root uptake of nutrients and water 
11.Advances in the understanding of nitrogen (N) uptake by plant roots: Malcolm J. Hawkesford and William R. Whalley, Rothamsted Research, UK 
12.Advances in understanding plant root uptake of phosphorus: Jiayin Pang, The University of Western Australia, Australia; Zhihui Wen, The University of Western Australia, Australia and China Agricultural University, China; Daniel Kidd and Megan H. Ryan, The University of Western Australia, Australia; Rui-Peng Yu, Long Li and Wen-Feng Cong, China Agricultural University, China; Kadambot H. M. Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia; and Hans Lambers, The University of Western Australia, Australia and China Agricultural University, China 
13.Advances in understanding plant root water uptake: Mutez Ali Ahmed, University of Bayreuth, Germany; Doris Vetterlein, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Germany; and Andrea Carminati, University of Bayreuth, Germany 
 
Part 4 Improving root function 
14.Understanding and exploiting the genetics of plant root traits: Roberto Tuberosa, Elisabetta Frascaroli, Marco Maccaferri and Silvio Salvi, University of Bologna, Italy 
15.The use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to improve root function and crop nutrient use efficiency: Melissa M. Larrabee and Louise M. Nelson, University of British Columbia, Canada 
16.The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to improve root function and nutrient-use efficiency: Tom Thirkell, Grace Hoysted, Ashleigh Elliott and Katie Field, University of Leeds, UK; and Tim Daniell, University of Sheffield, UK 
17.Using systems agronomy to exploit deep roots in crops: John Kirkegaard and Julianne Lilley, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
18.Rootstocks to improve root function and resource-use efficiency: Francisco Pérez-Alfocea, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain; Stephen Yeboah, CSIR-Crops Research Institute, Ghana; and Ian C. Dodd, Lancaster Environment Centre, UK 
19.Delivering improved phosphorus acquisition by root systems in pasture and arable crops: Richard J. Simpson and Rebecca E. Haling, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia; and Phillip Graham, Graham Advisory, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786763600 ¦ Pub date: January 2021 ¦ Extent: 686 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Advances in breeding techniques for cereal crops Edited by Professor Frank Ordon and Professor Wolfgang Friedt 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Exploiting genetic diversity 
1.Alien introgression and breeding of synthetic wheat: Wei Zhang and Xiwen Cai, North Dakota State University, USA 
2.Use of the secondary gene pool of barley in breeding improved varieties: Matthew Haas, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany; and Martin Mascher, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) and German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research, Germany 
3.Marker-assisted trait introgression for wheat breeding & research: Miguel Sanchez-Garcia, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco; and Alison Bentley, The John Bingham Laboratory, NIAB, UK 
 
Part 2 Double haploids (DH) 
4.Doubled haploid production in wheat: W. Tadesse, M. Sanchez-Garcia, S. Tawkaz and M. Baum, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
5.Doubled haploid (DH) production for barley: Benjamin Wittkop, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany; László Csélènyi, Saatzucht W. von Borries-Eckendorf, Germany 
6.Production of doubled haploid (DH) lines for hybrid breeding in maize: Willem S. Molenaar and Albrecht E. Melchinger, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
 
Part 3 Hybrid breeding 
7.Prerequisites, procedures and potential of hybrid breeding in wheat: Philipp H. G. Boeven and C. Friedrich H. Longin, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
8.Challenges and developments in hybrid breeding in barley: Timm Bernhard, Wolfgang Friedt and Benjamin Wittkop, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany 
9.Selection strategies in hybrid rye with special consideration of fungal disease resistances: Thomas Miedaner, University of Hohenheim, Germany; and Peer Wilde, KWS Lochow GmbH, Germany 
 
Part 4 High throughput phenotyping, genetic markers and QTL mapping 
10.Non-invasive phenotyping of cereal development: Andreas Hund, Lukas Kronenberg and Jonas Anderegg, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Kang Yu, KU Leuven, Belgium; and Achim Walter, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
11.Theory and application of phenotyping in wheat for different target environments: Matthew Reynolds and Francisco Pinto, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Mexico 
12.Development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for cereal breeding and crop research: current methods and future prospects: Carly Schramm, Yuri Shavrukov and Peter Anderson, Flinders University, Australia; and Akhylbek Kurishbaev and Satyvaldy Jatayev, S. Seifullin Kazakh AgroTechnical University, Kazahkstan 
13.Mapping and isolation of major resistance genes in cereals: Jan Bettgenhauser and Simon G. Krattinger, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia 
14.Leveraging the QTLome to enhance climate change resilience in cereals: Roberto Tuberosa, Marco Maccaferri and Silvio Salvi, University of Bologna, Italy 
15.Advances in statistical methods to handle large data sets for genome-wide association mapping in crop breeding: Boby Mathew, University of Bonn, Germany; Mikko J. Sillanpää, University of Oulu, Finland; and Jens Léon, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Nested association mapping in barley to identify extractable trait genes: Andreas Maurer and Klaus Pillen, Martin-Luther-University Halle Wittenberg, Germany 
 
Part 5 Genome wide association studies and genomic selection 
17.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in wheat: Susanne Dreisigacker, CIMMYT, Mexico 
18.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in barley: Ernesto Igartua, Carlos P. Cantalapiedra and Ana M. Casas, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain 
19.Genomic prediction in cereals: advantages and drawbacks: Patrick Thorwarth, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
20.Site-directed genome modification in barley and wheat breeding: Jochen Kumlehn, Stefan Hiekel and Nagaveni Budhagatapalli, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
ISBN: 9781786762443 ¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 612 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Soil & water management 

Improving water management in agriculture By Professor Jerry Knox, Cranfield University, UK 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Water for agriculture: externalities, drivers for change and future demands 
1.Introduction: improving water management in agriculture: Jerry Knox, Cranfield University, UK 
2.Forecasting future water use in agriculture: Upali Amarasinghe, IWMI, Sri Lanka 
 
Part 2 Managing water for agriculture: challenges and innovations 
3.Advances in irrigation scheduling/decision support systems for irrigation management: Mladen Todorovic, Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari, Italy 
4.Agronomic practices to optimise soil water retention: Stephen Anderson, University of Missouri, USA 
5.Advances in drainage design and management for irrigated agriculture: Henk Ritzema, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
6.Application of earth observation and remote sensing techniques in agricultural water management: Alfonso Calera Belmonte, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain 
 
Part 3 Implementing innovations in engineering and application technology 
7.Managing energy demands in irrigated agriculture: Juan Rodriguez-Diaz, University of Cordoba, Spain 
8.Solar powered irrigation: current developments and future uptake: Muhammed Arif Watto, University of Agriculture - Faisalabad, Pakistan 
 
Part 4 Securing water resources for agriculture: diversification and collaboration 
9.Modelling watersheds to optimise water supplies for agriculture and other uses: Graham Jewitt, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, The Netherlands 
10.Advances in farmer-led irrigation development: Philip Woodhouse, University of Manchester, UK 
11.Promoting IWRM and multi-sector collaboration in water management: Steve Moncaster, Consultant, UK 
12.Improving water use in agriculture to reduce environmental impact: the irrigation efficiency paradox: Bruce Lankford, University of East Anglia, UK 
13.Developments in water sharing and water trading to secure supplies for agriculture: Sarah Wheeler, University of Adelaide, Australia 
 
Part 5 Reducing the environmental impacts of irrigation 
14.The role of vegetative and riparian buffers for improving water management: Pippa Chapman, University of Leeds, UK 
15.Developments in the use of wastewater for crop cultivation: Tapas Biswas, CSIRO, Australia 
16.Managing climate change, droughts and water scarcity affecting agriculture: Ray-Shyan Wu, National Central University, Taiwan 
17.Water-energy-food nexus (WEF): Oscar Melo, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile 
ISBN: 9781801462747 ¦ Pub date: June 2023 ¦ Extent: 400 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Understanding and fostering soil carbon sequestration Edited by Dr Cornelia Rumpel 

 
Table of contents 
 
1.Introduction: Cornelia Rumpel, CNRS, France 
 
Part 1 Understanding carbon sequestration in soils 
2.Mechanisms of soil organic carbon sequestration: Ingrid Kӧgel-Knabner, Technical University of Munich, Germany 
3.Factors affecting soil organic carbon dynamics: Xiaojuan Feng, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China 
4.The role of biodiversity and soil biological activity on organic carbon sequestration: Patrick Lavelle, IRD, France 
5.Effects of abiotic factors affecting processes of soil organic carbon sequestration at different scales: Sebastian Doetterl, ETH, Switzerland 
6.Co-benefits and trade-offs in soil organic carbon sequestration: Cornelia Rumpel, CNRS, France 
7.The role of inorganic soil carbon in soil carbon sequestration: Yakov Kuzyakov, University of Gӧttingen, Germany 
8.Soil organic carbon sequestration and climate change: Muhammad Sanaullah, University of Faisalabad, Pakistan 
9.Transformation of organic wastes into soil amendments to foster soil organic carbon sequestration: Jorge Medina, Universidad de O'Higgins, Chile 
 
Part 2 Measuring carbon sequestration in soils 
10.Introduction: key issues in measuring carbon sequestration in soils: Matthias Kuhnert, University of Aberdeen, UK 
11.Advances in measuring soil organic carbon stocks and dynamics at the profile scale: Christopher Poeplau, Thünen Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Germany; and Edward Gregorich, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
12.Advances in soil mapping to assess levels of carbon sequestration at landscape scales: Budiman Minasny, University of Sydney, Australia 
13.Advances in modelling soil organic carbon dynamics: Carlos Sierra, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Germany 
14.Digital tools for assessing soil organic carbon at farm and regional scale: Matt Aitkenhead, James Hutton Institute, UK 
 
Part 3 Fostering carbon sequestration in soils 
15.Promoting carbon sequestration in soils: the importance of soil, region and context-specific interventions: Rattan Lal, Ohio State University, USA 
16.Agriculture practices to improve soil carbon sequestration in upland soil: Thomas Kätterer and Martin A. Bolinder, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden 
17.Agriculture practices to improve soil carbon sequestration in submerged soil: Pil Joo Kim, Gyeongsang National University, South Korea 
18.Managing grasslands to optimise soil carbon sequestration: Abad Chabbi, INRAE, France 
19.Managing forest soils to optimise carbon sequestration: Robert Jandl, OAW, Australia 
20.The contribution of agroforestry systems to improving soil carbon sequestration: Lydie Stella Koutika, CRDPI, Republic of Congo 
21.Management of organic soil to reduce soil organic carbon loss: Jens Leifeld, Agroscope, Switzerland 
22.Management of tropical soils: Deborah Dick, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 
23.Management of carbonate rich soils: Inigo Virto, Public University of Navarre, Spain 
24.Management of soil organic and inorganic carbon storage in urban areas and technosols: Cornelia Rumpel, CNRS, France 
 
Part 4 Socioeconomic, legal and policy issues 
25.Soil organic carbon on the political agenda: Luca Montanarella, European Soil Data Centre – EU JRC, Belgium 
26.Creating frameworks to foster soil carbon sequestration: Beverley Henry, Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Ram Dalal, The University of Queensland, Australia; Matthew Tom Harrison, University of Tasmania, Australia; and Brian Keating, The University of Queensland, Australia 
27.Developing carbon farming schemes: Sian Mooney, Arizona State University, USA 
28.Improving understanding and adoption of soil carbon sequestration practices amongst farmers: Michelle Wander, University of Illinois, USA 
29.Legal issues of implementing soil organic carbon sequestration as negative emission technology: Alexandra Langlais-Hesse, CNRS-Université de Rennes, France 
ISBN: 9781786769695 ¦ Pub date: October 2022 ¦ Extent: 600 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Improving soil health Edited by Professor William R. Horwath 

 
Table of contents 
 
1.Soil health: towards a sustainable world: William R. Horwath, University of California-Davis, USA 
 
Part 1 Dimensions of soil health 
2.Soil health: definitions and key concepts: Michelle Wander, University of Illinois, USA 
3.Understanding biological processes in soil: David Myrold, Oregon State University, USA 
4.Understanding mycorrhizal activity as a component of soil health: Xin-Hua He, University of Western Australia, Australia 
 
Part 2 Cultivation practices and soil health 
5.Agricultural traffic management systems and soil health: Paula Misiewicz, Harper Adams University, UK 
6.Assessing the effects of zero/no till cultivation practices on soil health: Daniel Manter, USDA-ARS, USA 
7.Assessing the effects of cover crops on soil health: Sieglinde Snapp, Michigan State University, USA 
8.Assessing the effects of crop residue retention on soil health: Hero Gollany, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 The role of organic and other soil amendments 
9.Assessing the effects of compost on soil health: Cristina Lazcano, University of California-Davis, USA 
10.Assessing the effects of using animal manure on soil health: Michael Goss, University of Guelph, Canada 
11.Assessing the effect of biosolids on soil health: Fiona Nicholson, ADAS, UK 
12.Biofertilizers: assessing the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on soil health: Marcel van der Heijden, University of Zurich/Agroscope, Switzerland 
13.Biofertilizers: assessing the effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGCR) on soil health: Raffaella Balestrini, Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection - Turin UOS, Italy 
14.The role of liming in improving soil health: Richard Hayes, DPI-New South Wales, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786766700 ¦ Pub date: October 2022 ¦ Extent: 400 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in measuring soil health Edited by Professor Wilfred Otten 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Measuring soil biological activity 
1.Assessing soil health by measuring fauna: Felicity Crotty, Royal Agricultural University, UK 
2.Quantifying earthworm community structures as indicators of soil health: Jacqueline L. Stroud, formerly Rothamsted Research, UK 
3.Characterisation of fungal communities and functions in agricultural soils: Andy F. S. Taylor, The James Hutton Institute and University of Aberdeen, UK; and Thomas Freitag, Lucinda J. Robinson and Duncan White, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
 
Part 2 Measuring soil physical and chemical properties 
4.Advances in visual soil evaluation techniques: Mansonia Pulido-Moncada, Aarhus University, Denmark; Bruce C. Ball, formerly Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK; and Wim M. Cornelis, Ghent University, Belgium 
5.Imaging soil structure to measure soil functions and soil health with X-ray computed micro-tomography: Alexandra Kravchenko and Andrey Guber, Michigan State University, USA 
6.Geophysical methods to assess soil characteristics: Ho-Chul Shin, Rothamsted Research, UK; Guillaume Blanchy, Lancaster University, UK; Ian Shield, Peter Fruen, Timothy Barraclough and Christopher W. Watts, Rothamsted Research, UK; Andrew Binley, Lancaster University, UK; and William R. Whalley, Rothamsted Research, UK 
7.Advances in techniques to assess soil erodibility: R. J. Rickson, E. Dowdeswell Downey, G. Alegbeleye and S. E. Cooper, Cranfield University, UK 
8.Advances in measuring mechanical properties of soil in relation to soil health: Muhammad Naveed, University of West London, UK 
9.Advances in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess soil health: Francisco J. Calderón, Oregon State University, USA; Andrew J. Margenot, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; and Scarlett Bailey, National Resources Conservation Service - National Soil Survey Center, USA 
10.Spectral mapping of soil organic carbon: Bas van Wesemael, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium 
 
Part 3 From measurement to management 
11.Developing soil health indicators for improved soil management on farm: Elizabeth Stockdale, NIAB, UK; Paul Hargreaves, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK; and Anne Bhogal, ADAS Gleadthorpe, UK 
12.Developing decision support systems (DSS) for farm soil and crop management: Matt Aitkenhead, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
ISBN: 9781786764263 ¦ Pub date: June 2021 ¦ Extent: 382 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Managing soil health for sustainable agriculture Volume 1: Fundamentals Edited by Dr Don Reicosky 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Overview 
1.Soil and soil health: an overview: Mark G. Kibblewhite, Cranfield University, UK and Landcare Research, New Zealand 
2.Soil ecosystem services: an overview: Sara G. Baer, Southern Illinois University, USA; and Hannah E. Birgé, University of Nebraska, USA 
3.Soil health and climate change: a critical nexus: Promil Mehra, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Australia; Bhupinder Pal Singh, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, University of Newcastle and University of New England, Australia; Anitha Kunhikrishnan, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia; Annette L. Cowie, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of New England, Australia; and Nanthi Bolan, University of Newcastle, Australia 
4.Integrated soil health management: a framework for soil conservation and regeneration: Daniel K. Manter and Jorge A. Delgado, USDA-ARS, USA; and Jennifer Moore-Kucera, USDA-NRCS, USA 
5.The economics of soil health: Maria Bowman , USDA-ERS, USA 
 
Part 2 Soil structure and composition 
6.Soil texture and structure: role in soil health: Rainer Horn, Heiner Fleige and Iris Zimmermann, Institute for Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Germany 
7.Chemical composition of soils: role in soil health: Samira Daroub and Claire Friedrichsen, University of Florida, USA 
8.Soil microorganisms: role in soil health: Penny R. Hirsch, Rothamsted Research, UK 
9.The role of soil fauna in soil health and delivery of ecosystem services: George G. Brown, Elodie da Silva and Marcílio J. Thomazini, Embrapa Forestry, Brazil; Cíntia C. Niva, Embrapa Cerrados, Brazil; Thibaud Decaëns, Université de Montpellier, France; Luís F. N. Cunha, Cardiff University, UK; Herlon S. Nadolny, Wilian C. Demetrio, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Lilianne S. Maia, Ana Caroline Conrado, Rodrigo F. Segalla and Alexandre Casadei Ferreira, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil; Amarildo Pasini, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil; Marie L. C. Bartz and Klaus D. Sautter, Universidade Positivo, Brazil; Samuel W. James, Maharishi University of Management, USA; Dilmar Baretta, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Brazil; Zaida Inês Antoniolli, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil; Maria Jesus Iglesias Briones, Universidad de Vigo, Spain; José Paulo Sousa, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Jörg Römbke, ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Germany; and Patrick Lavelle, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, France 
 
Part 3 Soil dynamics 
10.The role of soil hydrology in soil health: Melissa Miller and Henry Lin, Pennsylvania State University, USA 
11.Nutrient cycling in soils: E. A. Stockdale, Head of Farming Systems Research, NIAB, UK 
12.Plant–soil interactions: an overview: Richard W. Zobel, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Mechanisms of soil erosion/degradation: R. J. Rickson, Cranfield University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786761880 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 352 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Managing soil health for sustainable agriculture Volume 2: Monitoring and management Edited by Dr Don Reicosky 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Soil monitoring 
1.Soil health assessment and inventory: Indices and databases: Brian K. Slater, Ohio State University, USA 
2.Soil sampling for soil health assessment: Skye Wills, Stephen Roecker and Candiss Williams, USA-NRCS, USA; and Brian Murphy, Office of Environment and Heritage, Australia 
3.Biological indicators of soil health in organic cultivation : A. Fortuna, Washington State University, USA; A. Bhowmik, Pennsylvania State University, USA; and A. Bary and C. Cogger, Washington State University, USA 
4.The impact of heavy metal contamination on soil health: Santanu Bakshi and Chumki Banik, Iowa State University, USA; and Zhenli He, University of Florida, USA 
5.Modelling soil organic matter dynamics as a soil health indicator: Eleanor E. Campbell, University of New Hampshire, USA; John L. Field and Keith Paustian, Colorado State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Managing soil health 
6.Drainage requirements to maintain soil health: Jeffrey Strock, University of Minnesota, USA 
7.Managing irrigation for soil health in arid and semi-arid regions: Jeffrey Peter Mitchell and Howard Ferris, University of California-Davis, USA; Anil Shrestha, California State University-Fresno, USA; Francis Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Garrison Sposito, University of California-Berkeley, USA 
8.Effects of crop rotations and intercropping on soil health; Gilbert C. Sigua, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Use of cover crops to promote soil health: Robert L. Myers, USDA – SARE and University of Missouri, USA 
10.Optimising fertiliser use to maintain soil health: Bijay-Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India 
11.Manure and compost management to maintain soil health: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
12.Pesticide use and biodiversity in soils: Robert J. Kremer, University of Missouri, USA 
13.Conservation grass hedges and soil health parameters; Humberto Blanco-Canqui, University of Nebraska, USA 
14.Managing soil health in organic cultivation: A. Fortuna, Washington State University, USA; A. Bhowmik, Pennsylvania State University, USA; and A. Bary and C. Cogger, Washington State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Regional strategies in the developing world 
15.Supporting smallholders in maintaining soil health: key challenges and strategies: David Güereña, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Nepal 
16.Maintaining soil health in Africa: A. O. Ogunkunle, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; and V. O. Chude, National Program for Food Security, Nigeria 
17.Organic amendments to improve soil health and crop productivity: a case study in China: Minggang Xu, Wenju Zhang and Zejiang Cai, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Shaoming Huang, Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; and Ping Zhu, Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
18.Soil health assessment and maintenance in Central and South-Central Brazil: Ieda C. Mendes, EMBRAPA Cerrados, Brazil; Cássio A. Tormena, State University of Maringá, Brazil; Maurício R. Cherubin, University of São Paulo, Brazil; and Douglas L. Karlen, USDA-ARS, USA 
19.Maintaining soil health in dryland areas: Pandi Zdruli, Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM), Italy; and Claudio Zucca, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
ISBN: 9781786761927 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 462 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Water management for sustainable agriculture Edited by Professor T. Oweis 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fundamentals 
1.Understanding and measuring plant water use: Gretchen R. Miller, Texas A&M University, USA 
2.Dynamics of water storage and retention in soil: K. Rajkai, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary; F. Ács, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary; B. Tóth, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Pannonia, Hungary; and A. Makó, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary 
3.Climate change and water resources for agriculture; Luis Garrote, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain 
 
Part 2 Sustainable use of groundwater and surface water for irrigation 
4.An integrated approach for the estimation of crop water requirements based on soil, plant and atmospheric measurements: N. Jovanovic, S. Dzikiti and M. Gush, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), South Africa 
5.The economics of groundwater development and governance; T. Shah, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), India 
6.Managing surface water for irrigation; A. Qureshi, International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, United Arab Emirates 
 
Part 3 Other sources of water for irrigation 
7.Rainwater and floodwater harvesting for crop irrigation: Dieter Prinz, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany 
8.The use of treated wastewater for crop irrigation: Alfieri Pollice and Ramy Saliba, IRSA-CNR, Italy; and Antonio Lonigro, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy 
9.Use of brackish and marginal water for irrigation in water-scarce areas: Z. Gao, China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research, China 
 
Part 4 Irrigation techniques 
10.Developments in surface irrigation techniques: Taffa Tulu, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia 
11.Trickle irrigation systems: Megh R. Goyal, formerly University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico 
12.An overview of subsurface irrigation techniques: Andrea Dührkoop and Oliver Hensel, University of Kassel, Germany 
13.Fertigation techniques for efficient water and nutrient use in agriculture; Munir J. Mohammad Rusan, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan and International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI), USA 
 
Part 5 Managing water use on the farm 
14.Modelling water use on farms; L. S. Pereira and P. Paredes, University of Lisbon, Portugal 
15.Improving water productivity in rainfed agriculture: challenges and opportunities for small-scale farmers in dry lands: John Gowing, University of Newcastle, UK 
16.Improving water use in tropical rain-fed systems: the situation in India: Suhas P. Wani, Kaushal K. Garg, Girish Chander and K.H. Anantha, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
17.Deficit irrigation and site-specific irrigation scheduling techniques to minimize water use: Susan A. O'Shaughnessy, USDA-ARS, USA; and Manuel A. Andrade, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, USA 
18.Drainage systems to support sustainable water use: Henk Ritzema, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 6 Managing water resources 
19.Increasing water productivity in agriculture: an overview: Wayne S. Meyer, University of Adelaide, Australia 
20.Regional strategies in sustainable water management for irrigation: the eco-efficiency approach: Mladen Todorović, Centre International de Hautes Etudes Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM), Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari, Italy 
21.The challenge of sustainable water resources management under water scarcity: Pasquale Steduto, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; and Chris Perry, Former Research Director, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), UK 
22.Assessing the cost of supplying water for agriculture: the food supply cost curve: Roberto Roson, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786761767 ¦ Pub date: July 2018 ¦ Extent: 612 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Technology & data 

Advances in sensor technology for sustainable crop production Edited by Dr Craig Lobsey and Dr Asim Biswas 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Advances in remote sensing technologies 
1.Advances in remote/aerial sensing of crop water status: Wenxuan Guo, Texas Tech University, USA 
2.Advances in remote/aerial sensing technologies to assess crop health: Michael Schirmann, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Germany 
3.Advances in remote/aerial sensing techniques for monitoring soil health: Jeff Walker, Monash University, Australia 
 
Part 2 Advances in proximal sensing technologies 
4.Advances in using proximal spectroscopic sensors to assess soil health: Kenneth A. Sudduth, USDA-ARS, USA 
5.Advances in using proximal ground penetrating radar (GPR) sensors to assess soil health: Katherine Grote, Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA 
6.Using proximal electromagnetic/electrical resistivity (ER)/electrical impedance spectroscopy sensors to assess soil health and water status: Alain Tabbagh, French National Centre for Scientific Research, France 
7.Using GPR to map and improve soil drainage systems for improved crop yields: Barry Allred, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Advances in sensor data analytics 
8.Advances in machine vision technologies for the measurement of soil texture, structure and topography: Jean-Marc Gilliot, AgroParisTech, France 
9.Using machine learning to identify and diagnose crop diseases: Megan Long, John Innes Centre, UK 
10.Advances in proximal sensor fusion/multi-sensor platforms for improved crop management: David Franzen, North Dakota State University, USA 
11.Advances in integrating remote and proximal sensor data for precision agriculture applications: Luciano Shiratsuchi, Louisiana State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786769770 ¦ Pub date: December 2022 ¦ Extent: 400 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Improving data management and decision support systems in agriculture Edited by Dr. Leisa Armstrong 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 General issues 
1.Improving data access for more effective decision making in agriculture: Ben Schaap, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands and Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN), UK; and Suchith Anand and André Laperrière, Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN), UK 
2.Improving data standards and integration for more effective decision-making in agriculture: Sjaak Wolfert, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
3.Improving data identification and tagging for more effective decision making in agriculture: Pascal Neveu and Romain David, MISTEA, INRAE, Montpellier SupAgro, University of Montpellier, France; and Clement Jonquet, LIRMM, CNRS and University of Montpellier, France 
4.Advances in data security for more effective decision-making in agriculture: Jason West, University of New England, Australia 
5.Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) for more effective decision making in agriculture: L. J. Armstrong, Edith Cowan University, Australia; N. Gandhi, University of Mumbai, India; P. Taechatanasat, Edith Cowan University, Australia; and D. A. Diepeveen, Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Australia 
6.Improving data management and decision-making in precision agriculture: Soumyashree Kar, Rohit Nandan, Rahul Raj, Saurabh Suradhaniwar and J. Adinarayana, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT Bombay), India 
 
Part 2 Case studies 
7.Decision support systems (DSS) for better fertiliser management: Dhahi Al-Shammari, Patrick Filippi, James P. Moloney, Niranjan S. Wimalathunge, Brett M. Whelan and Thomas F. A. Bishop, The University of Sydney, Australia 
8.Developing decision-support systems for crop rotations: Zia Mehrabi, University of British Columbia, Canada 
9.Decision-support systems for pest monitoring and management: B. Sailaja, Ch. Padmavathi, D. Krishnaveni, G. Katti, D. Subrahmanyam, M. S. Prasad, S. Gayatri and S. R. Voleti, ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research, India 
10.Developing decision support systems for improving data management in agricultural supply chains: Gerhard Schiefer, University of Bonn, Germany 
11.Developing decision support systems for optimizing livestock diets in farms: Marina Segura, Concepción Maroto, Baldomero Segura and Concepción Ginestar, Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain 
12.Developing decision-support systems for pasture and rangeland management: Callum Eastwood and Brian Dela Rue, DairyNZ, New Zealand 
ISBN: 9781786763402 ¦ Pub date: April 2020 ¦ Extent: 340 pages ¦ Price £160/$190/€215 

Advances in crop modelling for a sustainable agriculture Edited by Emeritus Professor Kenneth Boote 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Modelling sub-systems 
1.Advances and improvements in modeling plant processes: Soo-Hyung Kim and Jennifer Hsiao, University of Washington, USA; and Hannah Kinmonth-Schultz, University of Kansas, USA 
2.Functional–structural plant modeling of plants and crops: Jochem B. Evers and Leo F. M. Marcelis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
3.Improving modeling of nutrient cycles in crop cultivation: Upendra Singh and Cheryl Porter, International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) and University of Florida, USA 
4.Improving modelling of water cycles in crop cultivation: Claudio O. Stöckle, Washington State University, USA; and Francisco Meza, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile 
5.Improving crop pest/disease modeling: J. M. Fernandes, Embrapa/Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil; W. Pavan, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil; D. Pequeno, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico; R. Wiest, Instituto Federal Sul-Rio-grandense (IFSUL), Brazil; C. A. Holbig and F. Oliveira, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil; and G. Hoogenboom, University of Florida-Gainesville, USA 
 
Part 2 Developing whole farm system, landscape and regional models 
6.Whole-farm system models in practice: diverse applications: Alison M. Laing, Cam K. McDonald, Andrew J. Ash and Diane B. Prestwidge, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia; and Holger Meinke, University of Tasmania, Australia 
7.The DSSAT crop modeling ecosystem: Gerrit Hoogenboom, Cheryl H. Porter, Kenneth J. Boote and Vakhtang Shelia, University of Florida, USA; Paul W. Wilkens and Upendra Singh, International Fertilizer Development Center, USA; Jeffrey W. White, USDA-ARS, USA; Senthold Asseng, University of Florida, USA; Jon I. Lizaso, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; L. Patricia Moreno, University of Florida, USA; Willingthon Pavan, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil; Richard Ogoshi, University of Hawaii, USA; L. Anthony Hunt, University of Guelph, Canada; Gordon Y. Tsuji, University of Hawaii, USA; and James W. Jones, University of Florida, USA 
8.Modeling crop rotations: capturing short- and long-term feedbacks for sustainability and soil health: B. Basso and R. A. Martinez-Feria, Michigan State University, USA; and B. Dumont, University of Liege, Belgium 
9.Integrating livestock production into whole-farm system models of mixed crop–livestock systems: Katrien Descheemaeker, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands; and Lindsay Bell, CSIRO Agriculture Flagship, Australia 
10.Integrating economic simulation models with whole-farm system models for ex ante technology impact assessment: John M. Antle, Oregon State University, USA 
11.Developing climate-based decision support systems from agricultural systems models: Clyde W. Fraisse, University of Florida-Gainesville, USA; Norman E. Breuer, Catholic University Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, Paraguay; and Victor Cabrera, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA 
12.Landscape models to support sustainable intensification of agroecological systems: C. Nendel and P. Zander, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Germany 
13.Agroecosystem models for delivering ecosystem services: Jerry L. Hatfield, Christian Dold, Erica J. Kistner-Thomas and Kenneth M. Wacha, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Modelling issues 
14.Data for developing, testing, and applying crop and farm models: Frits K. van Evert, Wageningen University & Research, Agrosystems Research, The Netherlands 
15.Dealing with uncertainty in crop models: Daniel Wallach, INRA, France 
16.Crop simulation model inter-comparison and improvement: Senthold Asseng, University of Florida, USA; Pierre Martre, INRA, France; and Frank Ewert, University of Bonn and Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Germany 
17.The future of crop modeling for sustainable agriculture: K. J. Boote, University of Florida, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762405 ¦ Pub date: December 2019 ¦ Extent: 542 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Robotics and automation for improving agriculture Edited by Professor John Billingsley 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Technologies 
1.An overview of machine vision technologies for agricultural robots and automation: John Billingsley, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
2.Advances in actuation and control in agricultural robots: Pål Johan From, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway and University of Lincoln, UK; and Lars Grimstad, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
3.Advances in communication systems in agricultural robots: Christopher Wiegman, Santosh Pitla and Scott Shearer, The Ohio State University, USA 
4.Human–robot collaboration in agricultural robots: Yael Edan, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel 
5.Global positioning systems (GPS) for agriculture: an overview: John Billingsley, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 2 Applications 
6.The use of agricultural robots in crop spraying/fertilizer applications: Ron Berenstein, University of California-Berkeley, USA 
7.The use of intelligent/autonomous systems in crop irrigation: Stefano Carpin, University of California-Merced, USA; Ken Goldberg, University of California-Berkeley, USA; Stavros Vougioukas, University of California-Davis, USA; Ron Berenstein, University of California-Berkeley, USA; and Josh Viers, University of California-Merced, USA 
8.The use of agricultural robots in weed management and control: Brian Steward, Jingyao Gai and Lie Tang, Iowa State University, USA 
9.The use of agricultural robots in orchard management: Qin Zhang and Manoj Karkee, Washington University, USA; and Amy Tabb, USDA-ARS, USA 
10.Advances in automated in-field grading of harvested crops: Jose Blasco, María Gyomar González González, Patricia Chueca and Sergio Cubero, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA), Spain; and Nuria Aleixos, Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain 
11.Advances in using robots in forestry operations: Ola Lindroos and Omar Mendoza-Trejo, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden; Pedro La Hera, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and The Cluster of Forest Technology, Sweden; and Daniel Ortiz Morales, Cranab, Sweden 
12.Advances in robotic milking: Marcia Endres and Jim Salfer, University of Minnesota, USA 
13.Advances in automating meat processing operations: Ai-Ping Hu, Georgia Tech Research Institute, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762726 ¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 326 pages ¦ Price £160/$190/€215 

Precision agriculture for sustainability Edited by Dr John Stafford 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Information gathering and processing 
1.Proximal crop sensing: Richard B. Ferguson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
2.Proximal soil surveying and monitoring techniques: R. Gebbers, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering (ATB), Germany 
3.Airborne and satellite remote sensors for precision agriculture: Chenghai Yang, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) in precision agriculture: Chunhua Zhang, Algoma University, Canada; and John M. Kovacs and Dan Walters, Nipissing University, Canada 
5.Key challenges and methods in identifying management zones: Spyros Fountas, Evangelos Anastasiou and Zisis Tsiropoulos, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece; Aristotelis Tagarakis, BioSense Institute - Research Institute for Information Technologies in Biosystems, Serbia; and Athanasios Balafoutis, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute of Bioeconomy & Agro-technology, Greece 
6.Modelling and decision support systems in precision agriculture: Nicolas Tremblay, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
 
Part 2 Delivery systems 
7.Variable rate application (VRA) technologies in precision agriculture: Ken Sudduth, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Spray technologies in precision agriculture: Paul Miller, Silsoe Spray Applications Unit Ltd, UK 
9.Intelligent machinery for precision agriculture: Qin Zhang, Washington State University, USA, Joseph Dvorak, University of Kentucky, USA; and Timo Oksanen, Aalto University, Finland 
10.Controlled traffic farming (CTF) in precision agriculture: Diogenes Antille, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 3 Applications 
11.Precision tillage systems: Pedro Andrade-Sanchez, University of Arizona, USA; and Shrinivasa K. Upadhyaya, University of California-Davis, USA 
12.Variable-rate seeding systems for precision agriculture: John Fulton, The Ohio State University, USA 
13.Site-specific nutrient management systems: Dan S. Long, USDA-ARS, USA 
14.Site-specific irrigation systems: Amir Haghverdi, University of California-Riverside, USA; and Brian G. Leib, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, USA 
15.Precision crop protection systems: E. C. Oerke, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Precision weed management systems: Roland Gerhards, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
17.Precision livestock farming and pasture management systems: Mark Trotter, Central Queensland University Institute for Future Farming Systems, Australia 
18.The economics of precision agriculture: James Lowenberg-DeBoer, Harper Adams University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786762047 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 514 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Insect pests, diseases & weeds 

Advances in understanding insect pests affecting wheat and other cereals Edited by Professor Sanford Eigenbrode and Dr Arash Rashed 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Aphid pests 
1.Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia): overview: Vicky Tolmay, Agricultural Research Council, South Africa 
2.Greenbug (Schizaphis graminum): overview: Tom Royer, Oklahoma State University, USA 
3.Greenbug (Schizaphis graminum): plant-insect interactions: Leonardo Crespo-Herrera, CIMMYT, Mexico 
4.Fescue aphid (Metopolophium festucae): Sanford Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, USA 
5.English grain aphid (Sitobion avenae): Deguang Liu, State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas - Northwest A&F University, China 
 
Part 2 Gall midges 
6.Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor): plant-pathogen interactions: Subhashree Subramanyam, USDA-ARS, USA 
7.Orange Blossom wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana): Gadi Reddy, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Wheat curl mite (Aceria tulipae): Gary Hein, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
 
Part 3 Other pests 
9.Wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus): David Weaver, Montana State University, USA 
10.Cereal leaf beetle (Oulema melanopus): Ted Evans, Utah State University, USA 
11.Wireworms (Elateridae): Arash Rashed, University of Idaho, USA 
12.Grasshoppers: Robert Srygley, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 4 Emerging issues 
13.Newly invasive insect pests of wheat: Michael Brewer, Texas A&M University, USA 
14.Biotechnology for wheat crop protection: potential and challenges: Ann-Marie Botha, Stellenbosch University , South Africa 
15.On-line decision support systems, remote sensing and AI applications for wheat pests: Daniel Leybourne, ADAS, UK 
ISBN: 9781801461139 ¦ Pub date: February 2023 ¦ Extent: 440 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in monitoring of native and invasive insect pests of crops Edited by Dr Michelle Fountain and Dr Tom Pope 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Detection 
1.Advances in techniques for trapping crop insect pests: Archie Murchie, AFBI, UK 
2.Advances and challenges in monitoring crop insect pests: the US experience: Erin Hodgson, Iowa State University, USA 
3.Developments in sampling/survey design for monitoring crop insect pests: Nicholas Manoukis, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Developments in crop insect pest detection techniques: Richard Mankin, USDA-ARS, USA 
5.Monitoring airborne movement of crop insect pests: Alistair Drake, Australian Defence Force Academy-University of New South Wales, Australia 
 
Part 2 Identification, modelling and risk assessment 
6.Advances in image-based identification and analysis of crop insect pests: Daniel Guyer, Michigan State University, USA 
7.Advances in crop insect pest population growth models: Mike Brewer, Texas A&M University, USA 
8.Advances in pest risk assessment techniques for crop insect pests: Mark Ramsden, ADAS, UK 
 
Part 3 Invasive species 
9.Assessing the potential economic impact of invasive insect and plant species: Alfons Oude Lansink, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
10.Developing effective phytosanitary measures to prevent invasive insect pests: Alan MacLeod, DEFRA, UK 
11.Developing successful IPM programmes to control/eradicate invasive species: Amy Morey, University of Minnesota, USA 
ISBN: 97818014610787 ¦ Pub date: January 2023 ¦ Extent: 400 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in integrated weed management Edited by Professor Per Kudsk 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Weed ecology 
1.Advances in understanding the contribution of weeds to the functioning of agroecosystems: Sandrine Petit, Séverin Yvoz, Alexandre Ploteau, Camille Zuccolo and Stéphane Cordeau Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRAE, Univ. Bourgogne, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France 
2.Advances in understanding the dynamics of weed communities in integrated weed management systems: Jonathan Storkey, Sustainable Agriculture Science, Rothamsted Research, UK 
3.Advances in managing arable weed propagules: Bärbel Gerowitt, University of Rostock, Germany; and Barbara Baraibar, University of Lleida – Agrotecnio, Spain 
4.Advances in understanding allelopathic interactions between weeds and crops: Çağla Görkem Eroğlu and Aurélie Gfeller, Agroscope, Plant Production Systems, Herbology in Field Crops, Switzerland; Anna Elizabeth Louw-Gaume, Agroscope, Corporate Strategy, Switzerland; and Judith Wirth, Agroscope, Plant Production Systems, Herbology in Field Crops, Switzerland 
5.Advances in understanding invasive characteristics in weed species: Ahmet Uludağ, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey; Mehmet Arslan, Erciyes University, Turkey; İlhan Üremiş, Hatay Mustafa Kemal University, Turkey; and Necmi Aksoy, Düzce University, Turkey 
 
Part 2 Intelligent weed control technologies 
6.Modelling the effects of cropping systems on weed dynamics: the trade-off between process analysis and decision support: Nathalie Colbach, AgroSup Dijon, INRAE, Université de Bourgogne, France 
7.Developing decision support systems (DSS) for weed management: Panagiotis Kanatas, University of Patras, Greece; and Ilias Travlos, Ioannis Gazoulis and Alexandros Tataridas, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece 
8.Advanced detection technologies for weed scouting: C. Fernandez-Quintanilla, J. Dorado and J. M. Peña, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (CSIC), Spain; and D. Andújar, Centro de Automatica y Robótica (CSIC), Spain 
9.Advances in precision application technologies for weed management: Ran N. Lati, Newe Ya’ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel; Roland Gerhards, University of Hohenheim, Germany; Hanan Eizenberg and Maor Matzrafi, Newe Ya’ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, Israel; Lior Blank, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center, Israel; and Svend Christensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
10.Advances in mechanical weed control technologies: Bo Melander and Margaret R. McCollough, Aarhus University, Denmark 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
11.On-farm implementation of integrated weed management: M. M. Riemens and M. Elings, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
12.Optimising integrated weed management in narrow-row crops: L. Bonin, ARVALIS-Institut du Végétal, France; R. Leskovšek, Agricultural Institute of Slovenia, Slovenia; C. Moonen, Institute of Life Science, Italy; W. Smith, NIAB, UK; and M. Sønderskov, Aarhus University, Denmark 
13.Integrated weed management in grasslands: Urs Schaffner, CABI, Switzerland; Heinz Müller-Schärer, University of Fribourg, Switzerland; and Andreas Lüscher, Agroscope, Switzerland 
14.Integrated weed management in perennial woody crops: Verónica Pedraza and José Luis González-Andújar, IAS-CSIC, Spain; Victoire Huet and Paul Tuteirihia, NIAB EMR, UK; and Julien Lecourt, Pôle Scientifique des vignobles Bernard Magrez, France 
15.Evaluating the economics of integrated weed management: Pieter de Wolf, Saskia Houben, William Bijker and Koen Klompe, Wageningen Plant Research, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786767455 ¦ Pub date: April 2022 ¦ Extent: 452 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Improving integrated pest management in horticulture Edited by Professor Rosemary Collier 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Using biological agents in integrated pest management 
1.Advances in biopesticides for insect control in horticulture: Travis R. Glare, Bio-Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University, New Zealand; and Aimee C. McKinnon, La Trobe University, Australia 
2.Advances in bioprotectants for plant disease control in horticulture: Philippe C. Nicot, Thomas Pressecq and Marc Bardin, INRAE, Pathologie Végétale, France 
3.Advances in biostimulants as an IPM tool in horticulture: Surendra K. Dara, University of California Cooperative Extension, USA 
4.Improving application systems for bioprotectants in integrated pest management (IPM) programmes in horticulture: Clare Butler Ellis, Silsoe Spray Applications Unit Ltd, UK 
 
Part 2 Using decision support systems in integrated pest management 
5.Advances in insect pest and disease monitoring and forecasting in horticulture: Irene Vänninen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Finland; 
6.Advances in proximal sensors to detect crop health status in horticultural crops: Catello Pane, CREA – Research Centre for Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Italy; 
7.Advances in decision support systems (DSSs) for integrated pest management in horticultural crops: Mark W. Ramsden, ADAS, UK; and Aoife O’Driscoll, NIAB, UK; 
 
Part 3 Improving integrated pest management techniques and implementation 
8.The use of agronomic practices in integrated pest management programmes in horticulture: Aude Alaphilippe, Claude Bussi, Marion Casagrande, Tarek Dardouri and Sylvaine Simon, INRAE UERI Gotheron, France; Pierre-Eric Lauri, INRAE UMR ABSys, France; Amélie Lefèvre, INRAE Agroecological Vegetable Systems Experimental Facility, France; and Mireille Navarrete, INRAE UR Ecodeveloppement, France 
9.Advancing conservation biological control as a component of integrated pest management of horticultural crops: Robbie D. Girling, Tom D. Breeze and Michael P. Garratt, University of Reading, UK 
10.Assessing the economics of integrated pest management for horticultural crops: Philip R. Crain and David W. Onstad, Corteva Agriscience, USA 
11.Encouraging integrated pest management uptake in horticultural crop production: Norma R. Samuel, Associate District Extension Director and Urban Horticulture Extension Agent, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, USA; and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida-Gainesville, USA 
 
Part 4 Case studies 
12.Practical application of integrated pest management in greenhouses and protected cultivation: Bruno Gobin, Els Pauwels and Joachim Audenaert, PCS-Ornamental Plant Research, Belgium 
13.Practical applications of integrated pest management in horticultural cultivation: the cases of protected tomato and outdoor Brassica production: Richard H. Binks, FreshTec Agricultural Consultancy Limited, UK 
14.Practical application of integrated pest management to control cabbage root fly in vegetables: Louis Lippens, PCG vzw – Vegetable Research Centre Kruishoutem, Belgium; Sander Fleerakkers, PSKW vzw – Research Station for Vegetable Production Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium; Femke Temmerman, Inagro vzw, Belgium; and Annelies De Roissart, HOGENT University of Applied Sciences & Arts, Belgium 
ISBN: 9781786767530 ¦ Pub date: March 2022 ¦ Extent: 486 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Microbial bioprotectants for plant disease management Edited by Dr Jürgen Köhl and Dr Willem Ravensberg 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Product development of microbials 
1.Advances in understanding modes of action of microbial bioprotectants: Gabriele Berg, Graz University of Technology and Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology, Austria; Peter Kusstatscher, Franz Stocker and Ahmed Abdelfattah, Graz University of Technology, Austria; and Tomislav Cernava, Graz University of Technology and Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology, Austria 
2.Advances in screening approaches for the development of microbial bioprotectants to control plant diseases: Wagner Bettiol, Embrapa (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation), Brazil; Flávio Henrique Vasconcelos de Medeiros, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Brazil; Josiane Barros Chiaramonte, Vittia Fertilizantes e Biológicos SA, Brazil; and Rodrigo Mendes, Embrapa (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation), Brazil 
3.Visualising plant colonisation by beneficial bacteria: a key step to improve the understanding of plant–microbe interactions: Stéphane Compant, Günter Brader and Angela Sessitsch, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Austria 
4.Durability of efficacy of microbial bioprotectants against plant diseases: Marc Bardin, Thomas Pressecq and Philippe C. Nicot, INRAE, Pathologie Végétale, Avignon, France; and Yousra Bouaoud, University of Bejaia, Algeria 
5.Advances in production and formulation of commercial microbial bioprotectant products: Jacob Eyal, Michael Dimock, and José João Carvalho, Certis USA LLC, USA 
6.Key issues in the regulation of microbial bioprotectants in the European Union: challenges and solutions to achieve more sustainable crop protection: Rüdiger Hauschild, APIS Applied Insect Science GmbH, Germany; and Willem J. Ravensberg, Koppert Biological Systems, The Netherlands 
7.Microbial bioprotectants and the marketplace: Mark C. Trimmer, DunhamTrimmer LLC, USA 
 
Part 2 Biological control agents 
8.The use of Bacillus spp. as bacterial biocontrol agents to control plant diseases: Adrien Anckaert, Anthony Arguelles Arias and Grégory Hoff, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, ULiege (University of Liège), Belgium; Maryline Calonne-Salmon and Stéphane Declerck, UCLouvain (University of Louvain-la-Neuve), Belgium; and Marc Ongena, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, ULiege (University of Liège), Belgium 
9.The use of Pseudomonas spp. as bacterial biocontrol agents to control plant diseases: Monica Hӧfte, Ghent University, Belgium 
10.Are there bacterial bioprotectants besides Bacillus and Pseudomonas species?: Emilio Montesinos and Anna Bonaterra, Institute of Food and Agricultural Technology, University of Girona, Spain 
11.The use of Trichoderma spp. to control plant diseases: Enrique Monte and Rosa Hermosa, Spanish-Portuguese Institute for Agricultural Research (CIALE) – University of Salamanca, Spain 
12.Clonostachys rosea to control plant diseases: Dan Funck Jensen and Mukesh Dubey, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Birgit Jensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; and Magnus Karlsson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
13.Bacteriophages to control plant diseases: Manoj Choudhary and Mathews Paret, University of Florida and North Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, USA; Aleksa Obradović, University of Belgrade, Serbia; Katarina Gašić, Institute for Plant Protection and Environment, Serbia; and Jeffrey B. Jones, University of Florida, USA 
14.The use of mild viruses for control of plant pathogenic viruses: Nelia Ortega-Parra, De Ceuster Meststoffen BV (DCM) and Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; Zafeiro Zisi, Scientia Terrae Research Institute VZW and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; and Inge M. Hanssen, De Ceuster Meststoffen NV (DCM), Belgium 
15.Biocontrol via mycoviruses, a neglected option for bioprotection?: Anne D. van Diepeningen, BU Biointeractions and Plant Health, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
 
Part 3 Examples of use of microbial bioprotectants 
16.Development and scale-up of bioprotectants to keep staple foods safe from aflatoxin contamination in Africa: Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, Matieyedou Konlambigue, Lawrence Kaptoge and Titilayo D. O. Falade, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nigeria; and Peter J. Cotty, Ocean University of China, China 
17.Using Verticillium albo-atrum WCS850 to control Dutch elm disease: Joeke Postma, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
 
Part 4 Future outlook on microbial bioprotectants 
18.The role of bioprotectants for disease control in integrated crop protection approaches: Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
19.Future outlook on microbial bioprotectants in agriculture: Willem J. Ravensberg, Koppert Biological Systems, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786768131 ¦ Pub date: November 2021 ¦ Extent: 734 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving durable disease resistance in cereals Edited by Professor Richard Oliver 

 
Table of contents 
 
1.Global patterns of cereal diseases and the impacts of breeding for host plant resistance: Serge Savary and Laetitia Willocquet, Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’alimentation et l’Environnement (INRAE), France 
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of cereals: rusts 
2.Advances in understanding the biology and epidemiology of rust diseases of cereals: Vanessa Bueno-Sancho, Clare M. Lewis and Diane G. O. Saunders, John Innes Centre, UK 
3.Advances in identifying stripe rust resistance genes in cereals: Tianheng Ren, Zhi Li, Feiquan Tan, Cheng Jiang and Peigao Luo, Sichuan Agricultural University, China 
 
Part 2 Fungal diseases of cereals: Fusarium head blight 
4.Advances in understanding the epidemiology of Fusarium in cereals: Stephen N. Wegulo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
5.Cereal-Fusarium interactions: Improved fundamental insights into Fusarium pathogenomics and cereal host resistance reveals new ways to achieve durable disease control: Claire Kanja, Ana K. Machado Wood, Laura Baggaley, Catherine Walker and Kim E. Hammond-Kosack, Rothamsted Research, UK 
6.Advances in genetic improvement of durable resistance to Fusarium head blight in wheat: Guihua Bai, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Fungal diseases of cereals: Septoria tritici blotch 
7.Advances in understanding the epidemiology of Septoria tritici blotch in cereals: Stephen B. Goodwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Understanding plant-pathogen interactions in Septoria tritici blotch infection of cereals: Y. Petit-Houdenot and M.-H. Lebrun, UMR Bioger, Université Paris Saclay, INRAE, AgroParistech, France; and G. Scalliet, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Switzerland 
9.Advances in breeding techniques for durable Septoria tritici blotch (STB) resistance in cereals: Harsh Raman, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Australia 
 
Part 4 Fungal diseases of wheat: Septoria nodorum blotch and spot blotch 
10.Understanding the plant-pathogen interaction associated with Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat: Gayan K. Kariyawasam, North Dakota State University, USA; and Timothy L. Friesen, Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Advances in genetic mapping of Septoria nodorum blotch resistance in wheat and applications in resistance breeding: Min Lin and Morten Lillemo, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
12.Advances in breeding techniques for durable resistance to spot blotch in cereals: Ramesh Chand, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India; Sudhir Navathe, Agharkar Research Institute, India; and Sandeep Sharma, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India 
 
Part 5 Fungal diseases of cereals: net blotch 
13.Advances in understanding the epidemiology, molecular biology and control of net blotch and the net blotch barley interaction: Anke Martin, Barsha Poudel and Buddhika Amarasinghe Dahanayaka, Centre for Crop Health, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Mark S. McLean, Agriculture Victoria, Victorian Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Tourism and Resources, Australia; Lisle Snyman, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; and Francisco J. Lopez-Ruiz, Centre for Crop and Disease Management, Curtin University, Australia 
14.Understanding plant–pathogen interactions in net blotch infection of cereals: Karl M. Effertz, Shaun J. Clare, Sarah M. Harkins and Robert S. Brueggeman, Washington State University, USA 
15.Breeding barley for durable resistance to net and spot forms of net blotch: Jerome D. Franckowiak, University of Minnesota, USA; and Gregory J. Platz, Hermitage Research Facility, Agri-Science Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 6 Fungal diseases of cereals: tan spot, blast and Ramularia 
16.Tan spot disease under the lenses of plant pathologists: Reem Aboukhaddour and Mohamed Hafez, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; Stephen E. Strelkov, University of Alberta, Canada; and Myriam R. Fernandez, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
17.Towards an early warning system for wheat blast: epidemiological basis and model development: J. M. Fernandes, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil; E. M. Del Ponte and J. P. Ascari, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil; T. J. Krupnik, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Bangladesh; W. Pavan, Universidade de Passo Fundo and SensorOn – Estrada do Trigo, Brazil; F. Vargas, SensorOn – Estrada do Trigo, Brazil; and T. Berton, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil 
18.Investigating the biology of rice blast disease and prospects for durable resistance: Vincent M. Were and Nicholas J. Talbot, The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of East Anglia, UK 
19.Ramularia leaf spot in barley: Neil Havis, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK 
 
Part 7 Barley yellow dwarf virus 
20.Advances in understanding the biology and epidemiology of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV): Douglas Lau, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil; Talita Bernardon Mar, National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Fellow (CNPq) (Embrapa-CNPq), Brazil; Carlos Diego Ribeiro dos Santos, Postgraduate Program in Plant Science, Faculty of Agronomy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil; Eduardo Engel, Postgraduate Program in Entomology, University of São Paulo, Brazil; and Paulo Roberto do Valle da Silva Pereira, Embrapa Florestas, Brazil 
21.Resistance breeding in barley against Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV): avoiding negative impacts on anatomy and physiology: Torsten Will, Frank Ordon and Dragan Perovic, Julius Kühn- Institute (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Germany 
 
Part 8 Fungal diseases of cereals: Regional strategies 
22.Key challenges in breeding durable disease-resistant cereals: North America: Christina Cowger, USDA-ARS, USA 
23.Achievements in breeding cereals with durable disease resistance in Northwest Europe: James K. M. Brown, John Innes Centre, UK 
24.Key challenges in breeding durable disease-resistant cereals: North Africa and West Asia: Sarrah Ben M’Barek, Regional Field Crops Research Center of Béja and CRP Wheat Septoria Phenotyping Platform, Tunisia; and Seyed Mahmoud Tabib Ghaffary, Safiabad Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center (AREEO), Iran 
ISBN: 9781786766014 ¦ Pub date: October 2021 ¦ Extent: 970 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Biopesticides for sustainable agriculture Edited by Professor Nick Birch and Professor Travis Glare 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 General 
1.Improving methods for developing new microbial biopesticides: Susan M. Boyetchko, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
2.Implementing biopesticides as part of an integrated pest management (IPM) programme: József Kiss, Szent István University, Hungary; and Marc Delos, Académie d’Agriculture de France, France 
3.Improving regulatory approval processes for biopesticides and other new biological technologies in agriculture: Wyn Grant, University of Warwick, UK; and Roma Gwynn, Biorationale, UK  
 
Part 2 Microbial biopesticides, entomopathogenic nematodes and mites 
4.Advances in the use of entomopathogenic fungi as biopesticides in suppressing crop pests: Enrique Quesada-Moraga, Meelad Yousef-Naef and Inmaculada Garrido-Jurado, University of Cordóba, Spai
5.Advances in the use of entomopathogenic bacteria/microbial control agents (MCAs) as biopesticides in suppressing crop insect pests: Tejas Rao and Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes, University of Tennessee, USA 
6.Advances in the use of Bt genes in insect-resistant crops: Salvatore Arpaia, ENEA Research Centre Trisaia-Rotondella (MT), Italy 
7.Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPBs) as biocontrol agents against invertebrate pests: Luca Ruiu, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Italy 
8.Advances in the use of entomopathogenic viruses as biopesticides in suppressing crop insect pests: Martin Erlandson, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
9.Advances in the use of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) as biopesticides in suppressing crop insect pests: Albrecht M. Koppenhöfer, Rutgers University, USA; David I. Shapiro-Ilan, USDA-ARS, USA; and Ivan Hiltpold, University of Delaware, USA 
10.Advances in the use of entomopathogenic oomycetes as biopesticides in suppressing crop insect pests: Aurélien Tartar, Nova Southeastern University, USA 
 
Part 3 Natural substance-based biopesticides 
11.Advances in the use of semiochemicals in integrated pest management: pheromones: Gadi V. P. Reddy, USDA-ARS, Southern Insect Management Research Unit, USA; Anamika Sharma, Montana State University, USA; and Angel Guerrero, Institute of Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia-CSIC, Spain 
12.Possible use of allelochemicals in integrated pest management (IPM): Toby Bruce, Keele University, UK 
13.Peptides as novel biopesticides: Lin Bao, Robert M. Kennedy, Kyle Schneider, Alvar Carlson and Andy Renz, Vestaron Corporation, USA 
14.Development of plant-derived compounds as biopesticides: Barbara Thuerig and Lucius Tamm, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
ISBN: 9781786763563 ¦ Pub date: March 2020 ¦ Extent: 366 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Integrated management of insect pests: Current and future developments Edited by Emeritus Professor Marcos Kogan and Professor E. A. Heinrichs 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Ecological foundations of IPM 
1.Foundations of an IPM program: detection, identification, and quantification: Michael E. Irwin, University of Illinois, USA; and Wendy Moore, University of Arizona, USA 
2.Advances in understanding species ecology: phenological and life cycle modeling of insect pests: Leonard Coop and Brittany S. Barker, Oregon State University, USA 
3.Understanding agroecosystems and pest management: from chemical control to integrated biodiversity management: Keizi Kiritani, formerly National Institute of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Japan 
4.Advances in understanding agroecosystems ecology and its applications in integrated pest management: Casey Hoy, Ohio State University, USA 
5.Advances in understanding the ecology of invasive crop insect pests and their impact on IPM: Robert Venette, USDA Forest Service, USA; and Amy Morey, University of Minnesota, USA 
6.Plant-insect interactions, host-plant resistance, and integrated pest management: Michael J. Stout, Louisiana State University Agricultural Centre, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultural and physical methods in IPM 
7.Advances in breeding crops resistant to insect pests: rice as a paradigm: E. A. Heinrichs and John E. Foster, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
8.The role and use of genetically engineered insect-resistant crops in integrated pest management systems: Steven E. Naranjo and Richard L. Hellmich, USDA-ARS, USA; Jörg Romeis, Agroscope, Switzerland; Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, USA; and Ana M. Vélez, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
9.Biotechnology applications for integrated pest management: Ruth Mbabazi and Karim Maredia, Michigan State University, USA 
10.Advances in physical control methods in IPM: Charles Vincent, Agriculture Agri-Food Canada Saint-Jeansur-Richelieu, Canada; Guy Hallman, Phytosanitation, Oceanside, USA; Phyllis Weintraub, Gilat Research Center, Israel; and Francis Fleurat-Lessard, Gradignan, France 
11.Robot-enhanced insect pest control: reality or fantasy?: Linton Winder, The BHU Future Farming Centre, New Zealand; and Rory Flemmer, Junior Enterprises, New Zealand 
 
Part 3 Biological methods in IPM 
12.Advances in classical biological control to support IPM of perennial agricultural crops: Ivan Milosavljević and Mark S. Hoddle, University of California-Riverside, USA 
13.Advances in conservation biological control and habitat management for IPM: Prisila A. Mkenda, Charles Sturt University, Australia and The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Tanzania; Sunita Pandey and Anne C. Johnson, Charles Sturt University, Australia and Graham Centre, Australia; and Geoff M. Gurr, Charles Sturt University, Australia, Graham Centre, Australia and Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University and Ministry of Education, China 
14.Advances in augmentative biological control in integrated pest management: Joop C. van Lenteren, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Vanda H. P. Bueno, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil 
15.Integrated pest management (IPM) in greenhouse and other protected environments: Margaret Skinner, Cheryl Frank Sullivan and Bruce L. Parker, University of Vermont, USA 
16.Advances in microbial control in integrated pest management: entomopathogenic fungi: Travis Glare and Aimee McKinnon, Lincoln University, New Zealand; Roma Gwynn, Rationale, UK; and Michael Brownbridge, Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, Canada 
17.Advances in microbial control in IPM: entomopathogenic viruses: Sean Moore, Citrus Research International and Rhodes University, South Africa; and Michael Jukes, Rhodes University, South Africa 
18.Advances in use of entomopathogenic nematodes in integrated pest management: David Shapiro-Ilan, USDA-ARS, USA; Selcuk Hazir, Adnan Menderes University, Turkey; and Itamar Glazer, Volcani Center, Israel 
 
Part 4 Chemical methods in IPM 
19.Chemical control in IPM systems: advances in selective pesticides and application systems: Graham Matthews, Imperial College London, UK 
20.Ecological impacts of pesticides and their mitigation within IPM systems: Linda J. Thomson and Ary A. Hoffmann, University of Melbourne, Australia 
21.Monitoring and minimizing health risks related to pesticides: Keith Tyrell, Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN UK), UK; Sheila Willis, Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN UK), UK and University of Cape Town, South Africa; Stephanie Williamson, Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN UK), UK; Davo Simplice Vodouhe, Organisation Béninoise pour la Promotion de l’Agriculture Biologique (OBEPAB) and Université d’Abomey-Calavi, Benin; and Anthony Youdeowei, Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN UK) and University of Greenwich, UK 
22.Peptide-based biopesticides: Shireen Davies, Rob Liskamp and Julian Dow, University of Glasgow, UK 
 
Part 5 Implementation 
23.Integrated pest management (IPM) of nematodes: Hendrika Fourie and Dirk De Waele, North-West University, South Africa 
24.Integrated pest management of mites: Oscar E. Liburd, Lorena Lopez, Daniel Carrillo, Alexandra M. Revynthi and Omotola Olaniyi, University of Florida, USA; and Rana Akyazi, Ordu University, Turkey; 25.Economic assessment of integrated pest management (IPM) implementation: George B. Frisvold, University of Arizona, USA 
26.The synergism of biocontrol and plant resistance: a path to advance IPM to higher levels of integration: Marcos Kogan, Oregon State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786762603¦ Pub date: October 2019 ¦ Extent: 1004 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Integrated management of diseases and insect pests of tree fruit Edited by Professor Xiangming Xu and Dr. Michelle Fountain 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fruit diseases 
1.Epidemiology and management of apple scab: Tom Passey and Xiangming Xu, NIAB EMR, UK 
2.Powdery mildew: biology, epidemiology, and management of Podosphaera spp. of tree fruit: A. Amiri and L. Gañán, Washington State University, USA 
3.Apple replant disease: causes and management: Zhiquan Mao and Yanfang Wang, Shandong Agricultural University, China 
4.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple cankers in Europe: Robert Saville and Leone Olivieri, NIAB EMR, UK 
5.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple canker in Asia: Baohua Li, Qingdao Agricultural University, China 
6.Brown rot: causes, detection and control of Monilinia spp. affecting tree fruit: Imre Holb, University of Debrecen and Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary 
7.Apple mosaic virus: biology, epidemiology and detection: Karel Petrzik, Biology Centre CAS, Czech Republic 
8.Plum pox virus: detection and management: Manuel Rubio, Federico Dicenta and Pedro Martínez-Gómez, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain 
 
Part 2 Integrated fruit disease management 
9.Disease monitoring and decision making in integrated fruit disease management: Angela Berrie, NIAB EMR, UK 
10.Breeding fruit cultivars with durable disease resistance: Vincent G. M. Bus and Joanna K. Bowen, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, New Zealand; Andrea Patocchi, Agroscope, Switzerland; Giovanni A. L. Broggini, ETH Zürich, Switzerland; Satish Kumar, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, New Zealand; and François N. D. Laurens, Institut National de Recherche Agronomique, France 
11.Improving plant propagation methods for fruit disease control: Ioannis Tzanetakis, University of Arkansas, USA; and Robert Martin, USDA-ARS, USA 
12.Improving fungicide use in integrated fruit disease management: Mengjun Hu, University of Maryland, USA 
13.Use of biocontrol agents in fruit tree disease management: Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherland
14.New techniques for managing post-harvest diseases of fruit: physical, chemical and biological agents: Simona Marianna Sanzani and Antonio Ippolito, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Italy 
 
Part 3 Insect pests of fruit 
15.Insect pests of fruits: aphids: Giuseppe E. Massimino Cocuzza, Università di Catania, Italy 
16.Integrated management of tortricid pests of tree fruit: Alan L. Knight, USDA-ARS, USA; Gary J. R. Judd, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Canada; Todd Gilligan, USDA-APHIS-PPQ, USA; Eduardo Fuentes-Contreras, Universidad de Talca, Chile; and William B. Walker III, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
17.Integrated management of mite pests of tree fruit: Rebecca A. Schmidt-Jeffris, Clemson University, USA; Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, USA; and Carlo Duso, University of Padua, Italy 
18.Integrated management of tree fruit insect pests: Drosophila suzukii (Spotted Wing Drosophila): Neil Audsley, Fera Science Ltd, UK; and Lorenzo Tonina and Nicola Mori, University of Padova, Italy 
 
Part 4 Integrated management of fruit insect pests 
19.Cultural control of arthropod pests in temperate tree fruit: Matthew J. Grieshop, Michigan State University, USA 
20.Improving monitoring and forecasting in integrated management of fruit arthropod pests: Tim Belien, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt VZW, Belgium; Slawomir Lux, inSilico-IPM, Poland; Bart De Ketelaere, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; and Dany Bylemans, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt VZW, Belgium 
21.Biological control in integrated management of deciduous fruit insect pests: the use of semiochemicals: Larry Gut, Christopher Adams and James Miller, Michigan State University, USA; and Peter McGhee and Donald Thomson, Pacific Biocontrol Corporation, USA 
22.Optimizing insecticide use in integrated management of fruit insect pests: Claudio Ioriatti and Gino Angeli, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Italy; Greg Krawczyk, The Pennsylvania State University, USA; and Carlo Duso, University of Padova, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786762566 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 748 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Critical issues in plant health: 50 years of research in African agriculture Edited by Dr Peter Neuenschwander and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Managing threats to plant health 
1.Key challenges in plant health in sub-Saharan Africa: stakeholder priorities: Kenton Dashiell, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
2.Introduction: meeting challenges in plant health in sub-Saharan Africa: Peter Neuenschwander and Manuele Tamò, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin 
3.Disease surveillance, diagnostics and germplasm health in crop protection: P. Lava Kumar, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; James P. Legg, IITA, Tanzania; Maria Ayodele, IITA, Nigeria; George Mahuku, IITA, Tanzania; and Alejandro Ortega-Beltran and Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria 
4.Conserving and exploiting biodiversity in crop cultivation in sub-Saharan Africa: Georg Goergen and Peter Neuenschwander, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; and Danny Coyne, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya 
5.Viruses affecting African crops and their vectors: James P. Legg, IITA, Tanzania, P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; George Mahuku, IITA, Tanzania, Everlyne Wosula, IITA, Tanzania; Livia Stavolone, IITA, Nigeria; Eugene Terry, New Markets Lab, USA; and Nilsa Bosque-Pérez, University of Idaho, USA 
 
Part 2 Plant health in practice: managing threats to key African crops 
6.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: cassava: Muaka Toko and Peter Neuenschwander, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; J. Steve Yaninek, Purdue University, USA; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; André Fanou and Victor Zinsou, Université de Parakou, Benin; Kerstin D. Wydra, Erfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany; Rachid Hanna and Appolin Fotso, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Cameroon; and Ouorou Douro-Kpindou, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin 
7.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: maize: Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Kitty F. Cardwell, Oklahoma State University, USA; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Fritz Schulthess, Rheinstrasse 160, Switzerland; William Meikle, USDA-ARS, USA; Mamoudou Sétamou, Texas A&M University, USA; and Peter J. Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: yam, taro and cocoyam: Babatima Djana Mignouna, IITA, Benin; P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; Danny Coyne, IITA, Kenya; and Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, Ranjana Bhattacharjee and David De Koeyer, IITA, Nigeria 
9.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: banana and plantain: Stefan Hauser, IITA, Nigeria; Clifford Gold, Nevada City, USA; Cornelia Pasberg-Gauhl and Friedhelm Gauhl, FG-Inter-Agro-Consult KG, Austria; Juliet Akello, IITA, Zambia; Kim Jacobsen, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Belgium; Lindsey Norgrove, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland; Daniel Coyne, IITA, Kenya; P. Lava Kumar, IITA Tanzania; George Mahuku, Manoj Kaushal, IITA, Tanzania; Valentine Nakato, IITA, Uganda; and Leena Tripathi and Jaindra Tripathi, IITA, Kenya 
10.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: legumes: Manuele Tamò, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; Léonard Afouda, Université de Parakou, Bénin; Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Harry Bottenberg, United States Agency for International Development, USA; Laura Cortada-Gonzales, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya; Harun Murithi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Barry Pittendrigh, Michigan State University, USA; Rachidatou Sikirou, Institut National des Recherches Agricoles au Bénin, Benin; Abou Togola, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; and Kerstin D. Wydra, Erfurt University of Applied Sciences, Germany 
11.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: vegetables: Ignace Godonou, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and Catholic University of West Africa, Benin; May-Guri Saethre, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Ghislain Tepa-Yotto, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and Université Nationale d’Agriculture, Benin; Désiré Gnanvossou and Ouorou Douro-Kpindou, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; and Danny Coyne, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya 
12.Identifying and managing plant health risks for key African crops: fruit and other tree crops: Peter Neuenschwander and Désiré Gnanvossou, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; Stefan Hauser, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Georg Goergen, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; Rachid Hanna, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Cameroon; Lindsey Norgrove, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland; and Koffi Negloh and Cyriaque Agboton, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin 
 
Part 3 Integrated pest management: putting it all together and exchange of knowledge with farmers 
13.Commercial products promoting plant health in African agriculture: Frederick Schreurs and Ranajit Bandyopadhyay, IITA, Nigeria; Christiaan Kooyman, IITA, Kenya; Alejandro Ortega-Beltran and Adebowale Akande, IITA, Nigeria; Matieyedou Konlambigue, IITA, Ghana; and Niels Van den Bosch, IITA, Nigeria 
14.Weeds affecting field crops and water bodies in Africa: David Chikoye, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Zambia; Friday Ekeleme, Stefan Hauser, Abebe Menkir and Alpha Y. Kamara, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Peter Neuenschwander and Obinna Ajuonu, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Bénin; and Hakeem A. Ajeigbe, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
15.Making integrated pest management (IPM) work in sub-Saharan Africa: Danny Coyne, IITA, Kenya; Michael Abberton, IITA, Nigeria; Sounkoura Adetonah, IITA, Bénin; Maria Ayodele, IITA, Nigeria; Laura Cortada-Gonzales, IITA, Kenya; Brice Gbaguidi, IITA, Bénin; Stefan Hauser and P. Lava Kumar, IITA, Nigeria; Peter Neuenschwander, IITA, Bénin; Marc Schut, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Manuele Tamò, IITA, Benin; and Abou Togola, IITA, Nigeria 
 
Part 4 Conclusions and future challenges 
16.Improving plant health in sub-Saharan Africa: conclusions and future challenges: Peter Neuenschwander and Manuele Tamò, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Benin; and May-Guri Sæthre, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
ISBN: 9781786762320 ¦ Pub date: February 2019 ¦ Extent: 492 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Integrated disease management of wheat and barley Edited by Professor Richard Oliver 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of cereals 
1.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: rusts: R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia 
2.Fusarium diseases: biology and management perspectives: Edward C. Rojas, Hans J. L. Jørgensen, Birgit Jensen and David B. Collinge, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
3.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria tritici blotch: S. B. Goodwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: powdery mildew: Javier Sánchez-Martín, Salim Bourras and Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland 
5.Diseases affecting wheat: tan spot: C. S. Moffat, Curtin University, Australia; and F. M. Santana, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil 
6.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria nodorum blotch: A. K. Ruud and M. Lillemo, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
7.A lesser-known pathogen of wheat: Bipolaris sorokiniana: E. Hill and P. Solomon, The Australian National University, Australia 
8.Diseases affecting wheat: wheat blast: J. L. N. Maciel, Embrapa Wheat, Brazil 
9.Diseases affecting barley: net blotches: Simon R. Ellwood, Curtin University, Australia; and Hugh Wallwork, South Australian Research and Development Institute, Australia 
10.Diseases affecting barley: scald: Wolfgang Knogge, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Germany 
 
Part 2 Key challenges in integrated disease management of cereals 
11.Challenges and prospects for fungicidal control of wheat diseases: R. J. Bryson and Horst-Dieter Brix, BASF, Germany 
12.Occurrence and avoidance of fungicide resistance in cereal diseases: Lise Nistrup Jørgensen, Aarhus University, Denmark; Richard Peter Oliver, Curtin University, Australia; and Thies Marten Heick, Aarhus University, Denmark 
13.Trends in exploring wheat and barley germplasm for novel disease resistance traits: Sambasivam Periyannan, Australian National University, Australia; and Lee Hickey, University of Queensland, Australia 
14.Developments in diagnostic techniques for cereal pathogens: Sadia Iqbal and Michael G. K. Jones, Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre - Murdoch University, Australia 
15.Natural antifungal compounds for the control of diseases in wheat and other cereals: A. Schouten, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
16.The role of crop rotation, intercropping and tillage practices for foliar disease management of wheat and barley: T. K. Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; K. Xi, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada; and H. R. Kutcher, University of Saskatchewan, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786762160 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 366 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Pesticides and agriculture: Profit, politics and policy By Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Pre-Productivist Period (2500 BC–1929 AD) 
2.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Productivist Period (1930–1973) 
3.The evolution of the pesticide industry in the Divergent Period (1974–2017) 
4.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Residual Productivism (1974-2017) 
5.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Neo-Productivism (1974-2017) 
6.The evolution of the pesticide industry under Post-Productivism (1974-2017) 
7.The evolution of the pesticide industry under the ‘Sustainability Paradigm’ (1974-2017) 
8.The future of pesticides and biotechnologies 
ISBN: 9781786762764 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 418 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Integrated weed management for sustainable agriculture Edited by Professor Robert L. Zimdahl 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Weeds 
1.Weed ecology and population dynamics: Adam S. Davis, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Weed-plant interactions: Bruce Maxwell, Montana State University, USA 
3.Invasive weed species and their effects: David R. Clements, Trinity Western University, Canada 
 
Part 2 IWM principles 
4.Key issues and challenges of integrated weed management: C. J. Swanton and T. Valente, University of Guelph, Canada 
5.Ethical issues in integrated weed management: Robert L. Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA 
6.Surveillance and monitoring of weed populations: Anita Dille, Kansas State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Using herbicides in integrated weed management 
7.Site-specific weed management: S. A. Clay and S. A. Bruggeman, South Dakota State University, USA 
8.Assessing and minimizing the environmental effects of herbicides: Chris Preston, University of Adelaide, Australia 
9.Trends in the development of herbicide-resistant weeds: Ian Heap, International Survey of Herbicide-Resistant Weeds, USA 
 
Part 4 Cultural and physical methods for weed control 
10.The role of herbicide-resistant crops in integrated weed management: Prashant Jha, Montana State University, USA; and Krishna Reddy, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Cultural techniques to manage weeds: Matt Liebman, Iowa State University, USA 
12.The use of rotations and cover crops to manage weeds: John R. Teasdale, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Developments in physical weed control: Eric R. Gallandt, University of Maine, USA; Daniel Brainard, Michigan State University, USA; and Bryan Brown, University of Maine, USA 
14.Flame weeding techniques: Stevan Z. Knezevic, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
15.Soil solarization: a sustainable method for weed management: Baruch Rubin, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; and Abraham Gamliel, The Volcani Center, Israel 
16.Weed management in organic crop cultivation: Greta Gramig, North Dakota State University, USA 
 
Part 5 Biological methods for weed control 
17.The use of allelopathy and competitive crop cultivars for weed suppression in cereal crops: James M. Mwendwa, Charles Sturt University, Australia; Jeffrey D. Weidenhamer, Ashland University, USA; and Leslie A. Weston, Charles Sturt University, Australia 
18.Bio-herbicides: an overview: Erin Rosskopf, USDA-ARS, United States Horticultural Laboratory, USA; Raghavan Charudattan, BioProdex Inc., USA; and William Bruckart, USDA-ARS, Foreign Disease-Weed Science Research Unit, USA 
19.The use of microorganisms in integrated weed management: Susan M. Boyetchko, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada , Canada 
20.The use of bacteria in integrated weed management: Ann C. Kennedy, USDA-ARS and Washington State University, USA 
21.The use of insects in integrated weed management: Sandrine Petit and David A. Bohan, UMR Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, France 
ISBN: 9781786761644 ¦ Pub date: December 2017 ¦ Extent: 476 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Rice insect pests and their management By Professor E. A. Heinrichs 

 
Table of contents  
 
1. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: root and stem feeders 
2. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: stem borers and rice gall midges 
3. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: leafhoppers and planthoppers 
4. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: foliage feeders 
5. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: panicle feeders 
6. Integrated pest management (IPM) of rice 
ISBN: 9781786761965 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 292 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Sustainability and environment 

Key issues in agricultural ethics By Emeritus Professor Robert L. Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 General 
1.What is agricultural ethics and why does it matter?: Paul Thompson, Michigan State University, USA 
2.Approaches to ethics: Katie McShane, Colorado State University, USA 
3.Institutionalising agricultural ethics: Robert Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA 
4.Gender dimensions of agricultural ethics: Samantha Noll, Washington State University, USA 
5.Agricultural ethics: a farmer’s perspective: Robert Zimdahl, Colorado State University, USA 
6.Virtues and agricultural ethics: Wendell Berry and the virtues that sustain the world: Wade Casey, Loyola University Chicago, USA 
 
Part 2 Ethical issues 
7.Agriculture and the environment: ethical issues: Richard Bawden, University of Western Sydney, Australia 
8.Ethical issues associated with the use of migrant labour in agriculture: Francesca Giare, CREA, Italy 
9.Intensification in agriculture: ethical issues: Alesandros Glaros, University of Guelph, Canada 
10.Key ethical issues in livestock farming: Natalie Evans, University of Guelph, Canada 
11.Ethical issues in developing new technologies in agriculture: Bart Gremmen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
12.Intellectual property rights in agriculture: ethical issues: Leland Glenna, Penn State University, USA 
13.Ethics in agricultural research: Neyyire Yasemin Yalim, Ankara University, Turkey 
ISBN: 9781801463133 ¦ Pub date: July 2023 ¦ Extent: 350 pages ¦ Price £145/$190/€175 

Promoting pollination and pollinators in farming By Professor Peter Kevan and Dr Susan Willis Chan 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Understanding pollinators and pollination 
1.What is pollination and what are pollinators in agriculture?: Lynn Adler, University of Massachusetts, USA 
2.Pollination, crop production and agricultural productivity: Dino Martins, Princeton University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding crop plant-pollinator interactions: olfactory attractants: Philip Stevenson, University of Greenwich, UK 
4.The role of wind-pollinated plants in plant-pollinator networks: Stephen Murphy, University of Waterloo, Canada 
 
Part 2 Threats to pollinators 
5.Assessing climate change impacts on pollinators: Kit Prendergast, Curtin University/Forrest Foundation, Australia 
6.Assessing the impact of disease on pollinators: Rob Paxton, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany 
7.Assessing the impact of pesticides on pollinators: Christian Maus, Bayer Bee Care Center, Germany 
8.Assessing the impact of introduced species of pollinators on agricultural production: Benoit Geslin, IMBE-CNRS/University of Avignon, France 
 
Part 3 Promoting pollinators and pollination 
9.The role of habitat conservation/restoration in protecting pollinators in agricultural landscapes: Stephen Buchmann, University of Arizona/formerly USDA-ARS, USA 
10.Altering crop management practices to promote pollinators: Jose Franco, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Landscape approaches to promoting pollinators in agriculture: Darren Evans, Newcastle University, UK 
12.Designing integrated pest management (IPM) programmes to protect pollinators and promote pollination for agricultural productivity: Dave Biddinger, Penn State University, USA 
13.Entomovectoring/apivectoring: using pollinators to spread biocontrol agents: Guy Smagghe, Ghent University, Belgium 
14.The use of managed bee populations to provide pollination services: Elina Lastro Nino, University of California-Davis, USA 
ISBN: 9781801460989 ¦ Pub date: November 2022 ¦ Extent: 500 pages ¦ Price £145/$190/€175 

Energy-smart farming: Efficiency, renewable energy and sustainability Edited by Emeritus Professor Ralph Sims 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Efficient use of electricity, heat and fuel 
1.Measuring and auditing on-farm energy use: Majeed Safa, Lincoln University, New Zealand 
2.Advances in energy-efficient lighting and ventilation for food production systems: Tom Tabler, Mississippi State University, USA 
3.Improving farm machinery operation and maintenance to optimise fuel use efficiency: T. A. Jensen and J. N. Tullberg, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; and D. L. Antille, University of Southern Queensland and CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
4.Efficient water management and irrigation on farms: K. Reardon-Smith and S. Mushtaq, Centre for Applied Climate Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; M. Scobie and J. Eberhard, Centre for Agricultural Engineering, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; and T. N. Maraseni, Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 2 On-farm renewable energy heat and power generation 
5.Assessing and modelling the costs of on-farm distributed renewable energy systems: Julio Pombo-Romero, University of Vigo, Spain 
6.Energy-smart innovation and renewable energy systems on farms: an overview: Ralph E. H. Sims, Massey University, New Zealand 
7.On-farm biomass technologies for heat and power: Ralph E. H. Sims, Massey University, New Zealand 
8.Developments in agrivoltaics: achieving synergies by combining plants with solar photovoltaic power systems: Stefano Amaducci, Eleonora Potenza and Michele Colauzzi, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy 
 
Part 3 Energy-smart farming: case studies 
9.Tools and technologies to reduce fossil energy use on dairy farms: Philip Shine and Michael D. Murphy, Munster Technological University, Ireland; and John Upton, Teagasc Moorepark, Ireland 
10.Energy-smart pig farming: Lee J. Johnston and Kelsey L. Hammers, West Central Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota, USA 
11.Energy-smart poultry farming: Yi Liang, University of Arkansas, USA 
ISBN: 9781786768353 ¦ Pub date: May 2022 ¦ Extent: 370 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture - Volume 3: Adoption and Spread Edited by Professor Amir Kassam 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.State of the global adoption and spread of Conservation Agriculture: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Theodor Friedrich, Retired Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Expert on Conservation Agriculture, Germany; and Rolf Derpsch, Consultant, Paraguay 
2.Conservation Agriculture in West and Central Canada: an integrated review of adoption: Tom Goddard, Consultant, Canada; and Adam Hayes, Soil Management Consultant, Canada 
3.Conservation Agriculture in the USA: Sjoerd W. Duiker, Penn State University, USA 
4.Conservation Agriculture in Central America, the Caribbean and Mexico: Jose R. Benites, Independent Consultant on Land and Water, and Conservation Agriculture, Peru; Theodor Friedrich, Retired Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Expert on Conservation Agriculture, Germany; Roberto Azofeifa Rodríguez, Head of the Department of Agro-environmental Production of the National Directorate of Agricultural Extension, Costa Rica; Ariel Espinoza Salinas, Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Nicaragua; J. C. Juárez López, FAO Technical Officer, Guatemala; Carlos Andrés Zelaya Elvir, Consultant, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (retired), Honduras; and Jose Escobar, Consultant ASA, CRS, El Salvador 
5.Conservation Agriculture in South America: Rafael Fuentes-Llanillo, IDR-Paraná IAPAR-EMATER and FEBRAPDP, Brazil; Marie Luise Carolina Bartz, University of Coimbra, Portugal and FEBRAPDP, Brazil; Tiago Santos Telles, IDR-Paraná IAPAR-EMATER, Brazil; Ademir Calegari, formerly IAPAR and FEBRAPDP, Brazil; Augusto Guilherme Araújo, formerly IAPAR, Brazil; Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; formerly IAPAR, Brazil; Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; David Roggero, AAPRESID, Argentina; Dimas Soares Junior, IDRParaná IAPAR-EMATER and FEBRAPDP, Brazil; Edgard Ramírez, AAPRESID, Argentina; Facundo Capandeguy, AUSID, Uruguay; Herbert Arnold Bartz, Farmer, Doctor Honoris Causa UEL and FEBRAPDP, Brazil (in memoriam); Jaime Hernández-Zamora, ANAPO, Bolivia; Ken Moriya, FEPASIDIAS, Paraguay; Luciano Dabalá, AUSID, Uruguay; María Cecilia Ginés, AAPRESID, Argentina; Martín Maria Cubilla, FEPASIDIAS, Paraguay; Ricardo Ralisch, formerly UEL Professor and FEBRAPDP, Brazil; Richard Trujillo Mendoza, ANAPO, Bolivia; Roberto Peiretti, Global Farmer Network, USA; Rolf Derpsch, formerly GTZ Paraguay Consultant, Germany; Telmo Jorge Carneiro Amado, UFSM, Brazil; and Theodor Friedrich, Retired Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Expert on Conservation Agriculture, Germany 
6.Conservation Agriculture in the agri-environmental European context: Emilio J. Gonzalez-Sanchez, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain, European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium and Asociación Española Agricultura de Conservación Suelos Vivos (AEACSV), Spain; Gottlieb Basch, Universidade de Évora, Instituto de Ciências Agrárias Mediterrânicas (ICAM), Portugal and European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium; Julio Roman-Vazquez, European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium; Elizabeth Moreno-Blanco, European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium; Miguel Angel Repullo-Ruiberriz de Torres, European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium and Centro Ifapa ‘Alameda del Obispo’, Spain; Theodor Friedrich, Retired Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Expert on Conservation Agriculture, Germany; and Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
7.Adoption and spread of Conservation Agriculture in North Africa: Rachid Mrabet, National Institute of Agricultural Research (INRA), Morocco; Haithem Bahri, National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water, and Forestry (INRGREF), Tunisia; Omar Zaghouane, Consultant, Algeria; Hatem Cheikh M’Hamed, National Institute of Agricultural Research of Tunisia (INRAT), Tunisia; Sherif Ragab Mohamed El-Areed, Beni-Suef University, Egypt; and Moamen Mohamed Abou El-Enin, Al Azhar University, Egypt 
8.Conservation Agriculture in West and Central Africa: Lamourdia Thiombiano, Agriculture and Environmental Research Institute, Burkina Faso; Kalifa Coulibaly, Nazi BONI University, Burkina Faso; Saidi Mkomwa, African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT), Kenya; Kofi Boa, CA Center, Ghana; Robert B. Zougmoré, CCAFS/ICRISAT/WCA, Mali; Oumarou Balarabe, CIRAD, France; Traoré Salifou, Joseph Ki Zerbo University, Burkina Faso; Sylla Halimatu, Ministry of Agriculture, Burkina Faso 
9.Conservation Agriculture in Eastern and Southern Africa: Saidi Mkomwa, African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT), Kenya; Sepo Marongwe, African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT), Zimbabwe; Raymond Nazare, Freelance Consultant, Zimbabwe; and Weldone Mutai, African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT), Kenya 
10.From theory to practice: key lessons in the adoption of Conservation Agriculture in South Africa: H. J. Smith, ASSET Research, South Africa; G. Trytsman, Independent Researcher, South Africa; A. A. Nel, Independent Agronomist, South Africa; J. A. Strauss, Western Cape Department of Agriculture, South Africa; E. Kruger, Mahlathini Development Foundation, South Africa; R. K. Mampholo, National LandCare Program Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, South Africa; J. N. Van Coller, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Libanon Farm, South Africa; H. Otto, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Korannafontein Farm, South Africa; J. G. Steyn, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Humanskraal Farm, South Africa; I. D. Dreyer, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Skulpspruit Farm, South Africa; D. Slabbert, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Van Rooyenswoning Farm, South Africa; R. Findlay, No-Till Club of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; E. Zunckel, Conservation Agriculture Farmer - Zunckels Farm, South Africa; and L. Visser, Agriculture Research Council – Small Grains, South Africa 
11.Conservation Agriculture in West Asia: Isam Bashour, Roula Bachour, Nicolas Haddad and Razan Dbaibo, American University of Beirut, Lebanon; Kassem Jouni, World Food Programme, Lebanon; Faten Adada, FAO Regional Office for the Near East and North Africa, Egypt; Yahya Shakhatreh, Yahya Bani-Kalaf, Abedaraheem Bawaliz, Iyad Musallam, Faddel Ismael, Mahmud Huwaian and Nabeel Bani Hani, National Agricultural Research Center, Jordan; Mina Devkota, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco; Atef Haddad and Yaser Musa, Aga Khan Foundation, Syria; Rabea Al Hayek, Agricultural Research Station, Syria; Abdulsattar Asmair Alrijabo, University of Mosul and Local Leader of the Conservation Agriculture Programme in Nineveh Province and North of Iraq, Iraq; Irfan Gultekin, Bahri Dagdas International Agricultural Research Institute, Turkey; Mohammad Esmaeil Asadi, Crop, Soil and Conservation Agriculture Systems, Golestan Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, Iran; and Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
12.Adoption of Conservation Agriculture in Central Asia: Aziz Nurbekov, Tashkent State Agrarian University, Uzbekistan; Alisher Mirzabaev, ZEF-University of Bonn, Germany; Muratbek Karabayev, CIMMYT, Kazakhstan; Nurali Asozoda, President Tajik Academy of Agricultural Science, Tajikistan; Nasriddin Khalilov, Samarkand Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Uzbekistan; and Dossymbek Sydyk, South-Western Research Institute of Livestock and Crop Production, Kazakhstan 
13.Conservation Agriculture in Eurasia: Hafiz Muminjanov, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; Tatiana Semenova, World Food Programme, Kyrgyzstan; Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Theodor Friedrich, Retired Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Expert on Conservation Agriculture, Germany; Avetik Nersisyan, International Plant Protection Convention, Italy; Turi Fileccia, formerly Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; Gagik Mkrtchyan, Armenian Technology Group Foundation, Armenia; Armen Zakaryan, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Armenia; Imran Jumshudov and Yagub Guliyev, National Agrarian Research Centre, Azerbaijan; Alena Abarava, Lyakhovichi State Agricultural College, Belarus; Allan Pineda Burgos and Demna Martsvaladze, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Georgia; Muratbek Karabayev, formerly International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Kazakhstan; Gulnaz Kaseeva, Public Organization “AgroLead”, Kyrgyzstan; Omurbek Mambetov and Cholpon Alibakieva, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Kyrgyzstan; Boris Boincean, Research Institute of Field Crops, Moldova; Mihail Rurac, State Agricultural University, Moldova; Vadim Bandurin, Association of the Supporters of No-till Planting, Russia; Luidmila Orlova, National Movement for Conservation Agriculture, Russia; Alexandr Toigildin, Ulyanovsk State Agricultural University, Russia; Khalil Safin, Bashkortostan State Agricultural University, Russia; Muhammadi Muminov, Jamshed Sangynov and Shavkat Juraev, Cooperative of Agricultural Extension Specialists “Sarob”, Tajikistan; Askarsho Zevarshoev, Public Organization “Eco Consultancy”, Tajikistan; Nicola Kosolap, Ukraine Agrarian University, Ukraine; Oksana Davis and Oleksandr Zhuravel, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Ukraine; Michail Draganchuk, YouTube channel “No-tiller”, Ukraine; Alim Pulatov, Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers, Uzbekistan; Aziz Nurbekov, Tashkent State Agrarian University, Uzbekistan; Josef Kienzle and Sandra Corsi, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; and Emilio J. Gonzalez-Sanchez, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain 
14.Conservation Agriculture in South Asia: Yashpal Singh Saharawat, International Fertilizer Development Centre (IFDC), India; Mushtaq Gill, SACAN Services, Pakistan; Mahesh Gathala, CIMMYT, Bangladesh; Tika Bahadur Karki, Nepal Agricultural Research Council, Nepal; D. B. T. Wijeratne, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Sri Lanka; Sayed Samiullah Hakimi, Kabul University, Afghanistan; Neelam Chaudhary, Directorate of Plant Protection and Quarantine, India; Md. Enamul Haque, Murdoch University, Australia; Richard W. Bell, Murdoch University, Australia; C. M. Parihar, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India; Harisankar Nayak, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India; Rajbir Singh, ICAR-Agricultural Technology Application Research Institute, India; R. K. Malik, CIMMYT, India; Upendra Singh, International Fertilizer Development Centre, USA; Raj Paroda, Trust for Advancement of Agricultural Sciences, India; and Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK 
15.Conservation Agriculture in Southeast Asia: Yuji Niino, FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Thailand; Victor B. Ella, University of The Philippines Los Baños, The Philippines; Florent Tivet, Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Agroécologie et Intensification Durable des Cultures Annuelles (AIDA), University of Montpellier, France and General Directorate of Agriculture (GDA), Department of Agricultural Land Resources Management (DALRM), Cambodia; Vira Leng, General Directorate of Agriculture (GDA), Department of Agricultural Land Resources Management (DALRM), Cambodia; Hoa Tran Quoc, Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), University of Montpellier, France, and Department of Agricultural Land Management (DALaM), Laos; Pascal Lienhard, Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Agroécologie et Intensification Durable des Cultures Annuelles (AIDA), University of Montpellier, France and Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Science Institute (NOMAFSI), Vietnam; Pham thi Sen, Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Science Institute (NOMAFSI), Vietnam; Thatheva Saphangthong, Department of Agricultural Land Management (DALaM), Laos; Vang Seng, General Directorate of Agriculture (GDA), Department of Agricultural Land Resources Management (DALRM), Cambodia; Lyda Hok, Royal University of Agriculture, Cambodia; Manuel Reyes, Kansas State University, USA; Stéphane Boulakia, Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Agroécologie et Intensification Durable des Cultures Annuelles (AIDA), University of Montpellier, France; and Sim Choon Cheak, Sime Darby Plantation Research Sdn. Bhd., Malaysia 
16.Adoption and spread of Conservation Agriculture in East Asia: Hongwen Li and Jin He, National Institute of Conservation Tillage, China Agricultural University and Conservation Tillage Research Centre, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, China 
17.Conservation Agriculture in Australian dryland cropping and in New Zealand: the lessons of 70 years: Jean-Francois Rochecouste, Grains Research Development Corporation, Australia; John Baker, Cross Slot IP Ltd, New Zealand; and Bill Crabtree, Farmer and Author, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786764751 ¦ Pub date: January 2022 ¦ Extent: 672 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

The sustainable intensification of smallholder farming systems Edited by Dr Dominik Klauser and Dr. Mike Robinson 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Understanding smallholder farming 
1.The challenges of smallholder farming: Steve Wiggins, Overseas Development Institute, UK 
2.The economics of smallholder farming: David Eagle and Nadira Saleh, Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), Canada 
 
Part 2 Agricultural production 
3.Water management for rainfed smallholder farming: Christoph Studer, Bern University of Applied Sciences (BFH), Switzerland 
4.Smallholder seed systems for sustainability: Ian Barker, International Potato Center (CIP), UK; Richard Jones, formerly AGRA-SSTP, Kenya; and Dominik Klauser, Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture, Switzerland 
5.Tools for pest and disease management by stakeholders: a case study on Plantwise: Washington Otieno, Willis Ochilo and Lorna Migiro, CAB International, Kenya; and Wade Jenner and Ulrich Kuhlmann, CAB International, Switzerland 
6.Improving integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) by smallholders: B. Vanlauwe, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya 
7.Access to mechanization for smallholder farmers in Africa: O. A. Fatunbi and R. Kombat, Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), Ghana 
 
Part 3 Access to finance and information 
8.Financial services for smallholders: Nikesh Ghimire, Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA), Canada 
9.Strengthening public-sector extension systems for smallholder farmers in Kenya: Charles Nkonge, David Kamau and Felister Makini, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Institute (KALRO), Kenya 
10.Strengthening commercial extension systems for smallholders: Matthew Freeman and Wanjiku Mungai, One Acre Fund, Kenya 
11.Supporting female smallholders: Margaret Adesugba, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Part 4 Access to value chains 
12.Improving market access for smallholders: Yanyan Liu, Nicholas Minot and Mengying Wang, International Food Policy Research Institute, USA 
13.Incentivizing sustainable production practices: improving and scaling extension, certification, carbon markets and other incentive systems: Christine Negra, Versant Vision LLC, USA; and Tanja Havemann, Clarmondial AG, Switzerland 
14.The role and challenges of the private sector in supplying inputs to smallholders: John Derera, Seed Co Group, Zimbabwe; and Joyce Gikera, Qualibasic Seed Ltd, Kenya 
15.The role and challenges of the private sector in enabling market access for smallholders: John Logan, TechnoServe, Kenya 
ISBN: 9781786764300 ¦ Pub date: November 2020 ¦ Extent: 466 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Reconciling agricultural production with biodiversity conservation Edited by Professor Paolo Bárberi and Dr Anna-Camilla Moonen 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Methods to study biodiversity in agroecosystems 
1.The challenge of monitoring biodiversity in agricultural landscapes at the EU level: M. L. Paracchini, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Italy; S. Condé, European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity – Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, France; R. D’Andrimont, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Italy; B. Eiselt, European Commission, Eurostat, Luxembourg, Luxembourg; O. Fernandez Ugalde, E. Gervasini and A. Jones, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Italy; V. Kovacevic, European Commission, DG Environment, Belgium; R. Oppermann, Institut für Agrarökologie und Biodiversität (IFAB), Germany; A. Orgiazzi, M. Van der Velde, C. Polce and C. Rega, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Italy; C. Van Swaay, De Vlinderstichting, The Netherlands; and P. Voříšek, Czech Society for Ornithology, Czech Republic 
2.Modelling biodiversity in agriculture: G. R. Squire, James Hutton Institute, UK 
3.Assessing the economic value of agricultural biodiversity: a critical perspective: Corrado Topi, Stockholm Environment Institute at York, Department of Environment and Geography and Interdisciplinary Global Development Centre, University of York, UK; and Leonie J. Pearson, Stockholm Environment Institute, Thailand 
4.Functional biodiversity for the provision of agroecosystem services: Paolo Bàrberi and Anna-Camilla Moonen, Institute of Life Sciences – Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy 
 
Part 2 Management practices to support agroecosystem services 
5.The role of field margins in biodiversity conservation in agroecosystems: Alicia Cirujeda and Gabriel Pardo, Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón (CITA-Universidad de Zaragoza), Spain 
6.The role of hedgerows in supporting biodiversity and other ecosystem services in intensively managed agricultural landscapes: Audrey Alignier, Léa Uroy and Stéphanie Aviron, INRAE, France 
7.Reconciling production and biodiversity in management of pastures and grasslands: Sylvain Plantureux, Université de Lorraine, INRAE, LAE, France 
8.The importance of agroforestry systems in supporting biodiversity conservation and agricultural production: a European perspective: M. R. Mosquera-Losada, J. J. Santiago-Freijanes, A. Rigueiro-Rodríguez, F. J. Rodríguez-Rigueiro, D. Arias Martínez, A. Pantera and N. Ferreiro-Domínguez, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain 
ISBN: 9781786763488 ¦ Pub date: September 2020 ¦ Extent: 282 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Climate change and agriculture Edited by Dr Delphine Deryng 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 The impacts of climate change on agriculture 
1.The effects on crop cultivation of increased CO2, temperature and ozone levels due to climate change: Eline Vanuytrecht, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) and KU Leuven Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Belgium 
2.Effects of climate change on agricultural soils: Kennedy Were, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation, Kenya; and Bal Ram Singh, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
3.Modeling the effects of climate change on agriculture: a focus on cropping systems: M. Adam, CIRAD, Burkina Faso; K. J. Boote, University of Florida–Gainesville, USA; G. N. Falconnier, CIRAD, France; C. H. Porter, University of Florida–Gainesville, USA; E. Eyshi Rezaei, University of Göttingen, Germany; and H. Webber, University of Bonn and Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Research (ZALF), Germany 
 
Part 2 The contribution of agriculture to climate change 
4.Quantifying the role of livestock in climate change: Julie Wolf, USDA-ARS, USA 
5.The role of crop cultivation in contributing to climate change: Sonali Shukla McDermid and David Kanter, New York University, USA 
6.The role of agricultural expansion, land cover and land-use change in contributing to climate change: Catherine E. Scott, University of Leeds, UK 
7.Measuring and quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural activities: Mohammad Ibrahim Khalil, University College Dublin & Prudence College Dublin/GSustain, Ireland; Syed Faiz-ul Islam, University College Dublin, Ireland; Macdara O’Neill, University College Dublin & Teagasc, Ireland; and Bruce Osborne, University College Dublin, Ireland 
 
Part 3 Adaption and mitigation strategies in agriculture 
8.Climate-smart crop production: understanding complexity for achieving triple-wins: Katrien Descheemaeker, Pytrik Reidsma and Ken E. Giller, Plant Production Systems, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherland
9.The contribution of integrated crop–livestock systems in combatting climate change and improving resilience in agricultural production to achieve food security: Mark van Wijk and James Hammond, International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya; Simon Fraval, International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya and Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Jannike Wichern, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Randall Ritzema, Olivet Nazarene University, USA; and Ben Henderson, Natural Resources Policy, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), France 
10.Agroforestry as a solution for multiple climate change challenges in Africa: C. Mbow, Future Africa at University of Pretoria, South Africa and Michigan State University, USA; E. Toensmeier, Perennial Agriculture Institute, USA; M. Brandt, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; D. Skole, Michigan State University, USA; M. Dieng, Senegalese Institute of Agricultural Research (ISRA), Senegal; D. Garrity, World Agroforestry Centre, Kenya; and B. Poulter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA 
ISBN: 9781786763204 ¦ Pub date: April 2020 ¦ Extent: 404 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Preventing food losses and waste to achieve food security and sustainability Edited by Professor Elhadi M. Yahia 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Food security: key issues: Silvia Gaiani and Jorge Fonesca, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
 
Part 1 The problem of food losses and waste 
2.Food losses and waste: definitions, causes and methods for quantification: Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, México; and Camelia Bucatariu, Independent Researcher, Italy 
3.The role of food losses and waste in food insecurity: Camelia Bucatariu, Independent Researcher, Italy 
4.The multidimensional socio-economic impacts of food losses and waste: Abdallah Omezzine, University of Nizwa, Oman; Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico; and Camelia Bucatariu, Independent Researcher, Italy 
5.The environmental impact of food loss and waste (FLW): I. Higuera-Ciapara and R. Lugo-Melchor, Food Technology Unit, Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, A.C. (CIATEJ), Mexico; and L. O. Noriega-Orozco, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C. (CIAD), Mexico 
6.The impact of food loss and waste on human nutrition and health: Jorge L. Chávez-Servín, Roberto A. Ferriz Martínez and Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
7.The role of food safety in food waste and losses: Dima Faour-Klingbeil, Plymouth University, UK and DFK for Safe Food Environment, Germany; and Ewen Todd, Ewen Todd Consulting, USA 
 
Part 2 Causes of food losses and waste 
8.Improving supply chains to prevent food losses and waste:an overview: Hamid El Bilali, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria 
9.Food losses during production of agricultural commodities: Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico; José de Jesús Ornelas-Paz, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C. (CIAD), Mexico; Puran Bridgemohan, University of Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad; and Santiago Vergara, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
10.Food losses and waste during food processing: Hanne Møller, Aina Elstad Stensgård and Ole Jørgen Hanssen, Ostfold Research, Norway 
11.Temperature deviations during transport as a cause for food losses: Reiner Jedermann, Institute for Microsensors, Actuators and Systems (IMSAS), Germany; Ulrike Praeger and Martin Geyer, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Germany; and Walter Lang, Institute for Microsensors, Actuators and Systems (IMSAS), Germany 
12.Food waste at the consumer level: Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico; and Marie Mourad, Center for the Sociology of Organizations (CSO), France 
13.Food waste in food services: Sampsa Nisonen and Kirsi Silvennoinen, Natural Research Institute Finland (LUKE), Finland 
 
Part 3 Food losses and waste in different commodities 
14.Food losses and waste in cereal grains: Tadele Tefera, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Ethiopia; and Esayas Mendesil, Jimma University, Ethiopia 
15.Losses and waste in fruits and vegetables: Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico; and Jorge M. Fonseca, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
16.Food losses and food waste in roots and tubers: Martini Binti Mohammad Yusoff and Azizah Binti Misran, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
17.Food losses and waste in meats: Salah El-Safty, Ain Shams University, Egypt; and Carlos F. Sosa-Ferreyra, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
18.Understanding and preventing seafood loss and waste: I. Higuera-Ciapara and R. Lugo-Melchor, Food Technology Unit, Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, A.C. (CIATEJ), Mexico; and L. O. Noriega-Orozco, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C. (CIAD), Mexico 
 
Part 4 Reducing food losses and waste 
19.Investment needs and role of the private sector in reducing food loss and waste: Pilar Santacoloma, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Colombia; Laura Brenes, Agribusiness School Tecnológico de Costa Rica and Costa Rican FLW Network, Costa Rica; Sara Granados, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Chile; Maria Fernanda Jimenez Morales, Agribusiness School Tecnológico de Costa Rica and Costa Rican FLW Network, Costa Rica; and Luis Saez, Universidad Santiago de Chile, Chile 
20.The role of food banks in food security and food loss and waste (FLW) prevention: Moez El Shohdi, Egyptian Food Bank/Food Banking Regional Network, Egypt; and Rasha El Shafei, Universities of Canada in Egypt, Egypt 
21.Reusing and recycling of food waste: Jesús R. Rodríguez-Núñez, Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico; and Armida Rodríguez-Félix and Tomás J. Madera-Santana, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo A.C. (CIAD), Mexico 
22.Householder food waste prevention campaigns: contributions from psychology and marketing: Sandra Davison and Anne Sharp, University of South Australia, Australia 
23.Reusing food waste: the importance of mycotoxin detection and decontamination: F. Ascencio, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, Mexico; and T. Sandoval-Contreras, Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic, Mexico 
 
Part 5 Regional case studies 
24.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: United States: Leigh Prezkop and Amanda Stone, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), USA; Gregory A. Baker, Santa Clara University, USA; Lisa K. Johnson, Independent Consultant, USA; and Jonathan Deutsch, Drexel University, USA 
25.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food loss and waste in Europe: Camelia Bucatariu, Independent Researcher, Italy 
26.Food losses and waste in the Near East and North Africa region: Elhadi M. Yahia, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Mexico 
27.Challenges and initiatives in reducing postharvest food losses and food waste: sub-Saharan Africa: Tanya Stathers, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK; and Brighton Mvumi, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe 
28.Challenges and initiatives in reducing food losses and waste: Latin America and the Caribbean: Laura Brenes-Peralta and María Fernanda Jiménez-Morales, Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Costa Rica; Murillo Freire Junior, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA), Brazil; Walter Belik, Universidad Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil; Natalia Basso, Ministry of Agriculture Livestock and Fisheries, Argentina; Gustavo Polenta, Centro de Investigación de Agroindustria del Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA), Argentina; Catalina Giraldo, Cadenas de Valor Sustentables SpA (Sustainable Value Chains), Chile; and Sara Granados, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Chile 
ISBN: 9781786763006 ¦ Pub date: March 2020 ¦ Extent: 852 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable urban agriculture By Professor Han Wiskerke 

Cover image: © Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm 
 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Building urban agriculture networks 
1.Creating a supportive public policy framework for urban agriculture: Johannes S. C. Wiskerke, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
2.The changing role of urban agriculture in municipal planning: from planning for urban agriculture to urban agriculture for planning: Nevin Cohen, City University of New York, USA 
3.Urban agriculture and local communities: encouraging engagement, building cohesion, and linking to global agreements: Laine Young, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada; and Alison Blay-Palmer, Wilfrid Laurier University and The Balsillie School of International Affairs, Canada 
4.Building continuous productive (peri-)urban landscapes: André Viljoen and Katrin Bohn, University of Brighton, UK 
5.Building natural resource networks: urban agriculture and the circular economy: Stefano Pascucci, University of Exeter, UK 
 
Part 2 Technologies for urban agriculture 
6.Rooftop systems for urban agriculture: Elisa Appolloni and Francesco Orsini, Bologna University, Italy; and Cecilia Stanghellini, Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture, The Netherlands 
7.Vertical farming systems for urban agriculture: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University, USA 
8.Redirecting nutrients in urban waste to urban agriculture: Rosanne Wielemaker and Jan Weijma, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
9.Pest management for urban agriculture: Giovanni G. Bazzocchi, University of Bologna, Italy 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
10.Optimizing horticulture for urban agriculture: B. W. Alsanius, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; M. Jirström, Lund University, Sweden; M. T. Naznin and S. Khalil, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; and E.-C. Ekström, Uppsala University, Sweden 
11.Optimizing livestock farming in urban agriculture: Delia Grace, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya; Elizabeth Cook, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya and University of Liverpool, UK; and Johanna Lindahl, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya and Uppsala University and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden 
12.Optimising aquaculture/aquaponics in urban agriculture: developing rooftop water farms: Anja Steglich, Grit Bürgow and Angela Million, Technical University of Berlin, Germany 
13.Optimizing urban beekeeping: Erik Stange, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Norway 
14.Optimising urban forestry: the food connection: Cecil C. Konijnendijk and Hyeone Park, University of British Columbia, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786763167 ¦ Pub date: February 2020 ¦ Extent: 408 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving carbon-negative bioenergy systems from plant materials Edited by Dr. Chris Saffron 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Technologies 
1.Biomass gasification for bioenergy: Maria Puig-Arnavat, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark; Tobias Pape Thomsen, Roskilde University, Denmark; and Zsuzsa Sárossy, Rasmus Østergaard Gadsbøll, Lasse Røngaard Clausen and Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
2.Fast pyrolysis for biofuel production: David Shonnard, Olumide Winjobi and Daniel Kulas, Michigan Technological University, USA 
3.Producing biofuels with torrefaction: Donald R. Fosnacht, Natural Resources Research Institute – University of Minnesota, USA 
 
Part 2 Materials 
4.Production of biodiesel from renewable sources: Dan Zeng, Daidi Fan, Le Wu and Yuqi Wang, Northwest University, China 
5.Production of biodiesel from oilseeds: Jatropha curcas: Rahmath Abdulla, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia 
6.Production of biodiesel from oilseeds: canola/rapeseed: B. Brian He and Dev Shrestha, University of Idaho, USA 
7.Sustainable use of Miscanthus for biofuel: Paul Robson, University of Aberystwyth, UK; Astley Hastings, University of Aberdeen, UK; John Clifton-Brown, University of Aberystwyth, UK; and Jon McCalmont, University of Exeter, UK 
8.Sustainable use of switchgrass for biofuel: John Fike, Virginia Tech, USA; Vance Owens, South Dakota State University, USA; David Parrish, Virginia Tech, USA; and Rana Genedy, Cairo, Egypt 
9.Sustainable production of willow for biofuel use: M. Weih, P.-A. Hansson, J. A. Ohlsson, M. Sandgren, A. Schnürer and A.-C. Rönnberg- Wästljung, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
10.Sustainable use of seaweed for biofuel: Jay Liu, Boris Brigljević and Peyman Fasahati, Pukyong National University, South Korea 
ISBN: 9781786762528 ¦ Pub date: February 2020 ¦ Extent: 410 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture - Volume 1: Systems and Science By Professor Amir Kassam 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.The need for Conservation Agriculture: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; and Laila Kassam, Animal Think Tank, UK 
2.Development of Conservation Agriculture systems globally: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Rolf Derpsch, Consultant, Paraguay; and Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
3.Conservation Agriculture Systems: soil health and landscape management: Don Reicosky, Soil Scientist Emeritus USDA-ARS and University of Minnesota, USA 
4.The role of no or minimum mechanical soil disturbance in Conservation Agriculture systems: Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
5.The role and management of soil mulch and cover crops in Conservation Agriculture systems: A. Calegari, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; T. Tiecher, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil; E. B. Wutke, Research Agricultural Institute of Campinas (IAC), Brazil; L. B. dos S. Canalli, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; R. Bunch, Consultant, Brazil; and D. dos S. Rheinheimer, Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil 
6.The role of crop and cropping system management in Conservation Agriculture systems: Peter Hobbs, Cornell University, USA; Christian Thierfelder, International Maize and Wheat Research Center (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe; Patrick Wall, Independent Consultant – Sustainable Agricultural Systems, Mexico; Raj Gupta, Center for Advancement of Sustainable Agriculture, India; and Ademir Calegari, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil 
7.Management of vegetable Conservation Agriculture systems: Jamil Abdalla Fayad, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Brazil; Jucinei José Comin, Federal University of Santa Catarina State (UFSC), Brazil; Alvaro Mafra, Santa Catarina State University, Brazil; Claudinei Kurtz, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Brazil; Samira Jamil Fayad, Santa Catarina State University, Brazil; Nuno Rodrigues Madeira, EMBRAPA, Brazil; Darlan Marcheze and Leandro do Prado Wildner, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Company of Santa Catarina (EPAGRI), Brazil; Ademir Calegari, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; and Arcangelo Loss, Cledimar Rogério Lourenzi, Monique Souza, and Guilherme Wilbert Ferreira, Federal University of Santa Catarina State (UFSC), Brazil 
8.Managing perennial Conservation Agriculture systems: orchards, plantations and agroforestry: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Emilio J. González- Sánchez, University of Cordoba and Asociación Española de Agricultura de Conservación Suelos Vivos (AEACSV), Spain and European Conservation Agriculture Federation, Belgium; Sim Choon Cheak, Sime Darby Research Sdn. Bhd, Malaysia; Zaharah A. Rahman, formerly Putra University, Malaysia; Julio Roman-Vazquez and Francisco Marquez-Garcia, University of Cordoba, Spain; Rosa Carbonell-Bojollo, Centro IFAPA Alameda del Obispo, Spain; Oscar Veroz-Gonzalez, Asociación Española de Agricultura de Conservación Suelos Vivos (AEACSV), Spain; and Dennis P. Garrity, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Kenya 
9.Integration of crop-livestock in Conservation Agriculture systems: John N. Landers, Independent Consultant, Brazil; Pedro Luiz de Freitas, Embrapa Solos, Brazil; Luiz Carlos Balbino, Embrapa Cerrados, Brazil; Júlio César Salton, Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste, Brazil; and Robélio Leandro Marchão, Embrapa Cerrados, Brazil 
10.Status of mechanization in Conservation Agriculture systems: Augusto Guilherme de Araújo, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; Brian Sims, Independent Consultant, UK; Jack Desbiolles, University of South Australia, Australia; Denizart Bolonhezi, Agronomic Institute of Campinas (IAC), Brazil; Enamul Haque, Murdoch University, Australia; He Jin, China Agricultural University, China; Jamil Abdalla Fayad, Independent Consultant, Brazil; Josef Kienzle, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; Leandro do Prado Wildner, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Corporation of Santa Catarina State (EPAGRI), Brazil; Li Hongwen, China Agricultural University, China; Marcelo Zanella, Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Corporation of Santa Catarina State (EPAGRI), Brazil; Oussama El Gharras, National Agricultural Research Institute (INRA), Morocco; Richard Bell, Murdoch University, Australia; Roberto Peiretti, Global Farmer Network (GFN), Argentina; Saidi Mkomwa, African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT), Kenya; Sjoerd Willem Duiker, Pennsylvania State University, USA; and Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
11.Certification schemes for Conservation Agriculture systems: Juliana Albertengo, Iowa State University, USA 
12.Institutional and policy support for Conservation Agriculture uptake: Tom Goddard, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada; Gottlieb Basch, University of Evora, Portugal; Rolf Derpsh, Agricultural Consultant, Paraguay; Li Hongwen and He Jin, China Agriculture University, China; Muratbek Karabayev, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico; Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Ken Moriya, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Paraguay; Roberto Peiretti, Agricultural Consultant, Argentina; and Hendrik Smith, Grain SA, South Africa 
ISBN: 9781786762641 ¦ Pub date: January 2020 ¦ Extent: 602 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture Volume 2: Practice and Benefits By Professor Amir Kassam 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Practice and benefits of Conservation Agriculture systems: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; and Laila Kassam, Animal Think Tank, UK 
2.Crop and cropping systems management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Muhammad Farooq, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, University of Agriculture, Pakistan, and The University of Western Australia, Australia; Ahmad Nawaz, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan; Yashpal Singh Saharawat, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Lebanon; Timothy Reeves, The University of Melbourne, Australia; and Kadambot Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
3.Soil management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Michele Pisante, University of Teramo, Italy; Angelica Galieni, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics and Research Centre for Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Italy; Gottlieb Basch, University of Évora, Portugal; Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy; and Fabio Stagnari, University of Teramo, Italy 
4.Weed management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Gottlieb Basch and Fernando Teixeira, University of Évora, Portugal; and Sjoerd W. Duiker, Penn State University, USA 
5.Insect pest and disease management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: a case of push–pull practice: Z. R. Khan, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), Kenya; A. W. Murage, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), Kenya; and J. O. Pittchar and C. A. O. Midega, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), Kenya 
6.Nutrient management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Stephane Boulakia, Florent Tivet and Olivier Husson, Centre de coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), France; and Lucien Séguy, AgroécoRiz, France 
7.Carbon management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Carbon sequestration rates: João Carlos de Moraes Sá, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil; Florent Tivet, Centre de coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), France; Rattan Lal, The Ohio State University, USA; Ademir de Oliveira Ferreira, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Brazil; Clever Briedis, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Agricultural Instrumentation Center, Brazil; Thiago Massao Inagaki, Technical University of Munich, Germany; and Daniel Potma Gonçalves and Jucimare Romaniw, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil 
8.Carbon management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: soil organic carbon fraction losses and restoration: João Carlos de Moraes Sá, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil; Florent Tivet, CIRAD, France; Rattan Lal, The Ohio State University, USA; Ademir de Oliveira Ferreira, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Brazil; Clever Briedis, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Agricultural Instrumentation Center, Brazil; Thiago Massao Inagaki, Technical University of Munich, Germany; and Daniel Potma Gonçalves and Jucimare Romaniw, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil 
9.Biodiversity management practices and benefits in Conservation Agriculture systems: Scott Day, Treelane Farms Ltd, Canada; Ademir Calegari, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; Alessandra Santos, Marcus Cremonesi, Lilianne Maia and Wilian Demetrio, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil; and Marie L. C. Bartz, Coimbra University, Portugal 
10.Conservation Agriculture: climate change mitigation and adaptation benefits: Emilio J. Gonzalez Sanchez, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain, European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium and Asociación Española Agricultura de Conservación. Suelos Vivos (AEAC.SV), Spain; Oscar Veroz-Gonzalez, Asociación Española Agricultura de Conservación. Suelos Vivos (AEAC.SV), Spain; Manuel Morena-Garcia and Rafaela Ordoñez-Fernandez, IFAPA Centro Alameda del Obispo, Spain; Jesus A. Gil-Ribes and Julio Roman-Vazquez, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain; Antonio Holgado-Cabrera, IFAPA Centro Alameda del Obispo, Spain; Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Gordon Conway, Imperial College London, UK; Saidi Mkomwa, African Conservation Tillage Network, Kenya; Paula Triviño-Tarradas, Antonio Miranda-Fuentes and Francisco Marquez-Garcia, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain; and Rosa M. Carbonell-Bojollo, IFAPA Centro Alameda del Obispo, Spain 
11.Benefits of Conservation Agriculture to farmers and society: Patrick Wall, Independent Consultant – Sustainable Agricultural Systems, Mexico; Christian Thierfelder, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe; Peter Hobbs, Cornell University, USA; Jon Hellin, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines; and Bram Govaerts, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
12.Social benefits of Conservation Agriculture systems: Rafael Fuentes Llanillo, Tiago Santos Telles and Dimas Soares Junior, Agricultural Research Institute of Paraná State (IAPAR), Brazil; Sara Kaweesa, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria; and Anne-Marie B. Mayer, Independent Nutrition and Agriculture Consultant, UK 
13.Harnessing ecosystem services with Conservation Agriculture: Amir Kassam, University of Reading, UK; Emilio J. Gonzalez Sanchez, Universidad de Córdoba, Spain,European Conservation Agriculture Federation (ECAF), Belgium and Asociación Española Agricultura de Conservación. Suelos Vivos (AEAC.SV), Spain; Tom Goddard, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada; Li Hongwen, Conservation Tillage Research Centre, China Agriculture University, China; Ivo Mello, Instituto Rio Grandense do Arroz, Brazil; Saidi Mkomwa, African Conservation Tillage Network, Kenya; Francis Shaxson, Land Husbandry Group, Tropical Agricultural Association, UK; and Theodor Friedrich, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Italy 
14.Rehabilitating degraded and abandoned agricultural lands with Conservation Agriculture systems: Telmo Jorge Carneiro Amado, Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil; Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil; Claudio Hideo Martins da Costa, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil; Otávio dos Anjos Leal, Catarinense Federal Institute, Brazil; and Luan Pierre Pott, Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil 
ISBN: 9781786762689 ¦ Pub date: January 2020 ¦ Extent: 498 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Assessing the environmental impact of agriculture By Professor Bo P. Weidema 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Life cycle assessment 
1.Life cycle assessment methodology for agriculture: some considerations for best practices: Seyyed Hassan Pishgar-Komleh, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Poland and Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic; Paria Sefeedpari, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Poland; Nathan Pelletier, University of British Columbia, Canada; and Miguel Brandão, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden 
2.Key challenges in modelling of agricultural activities and their environmental impacts: Evelyne A. Groen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
3.The use of farm-level models to assess the environmental impact of livestock production: Alasdair Sykes, Cairistiona Topp and Robert Rees, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK 
4.Assessing the environmental impact of ruminant production systems: Taro Takahashi, Rothamsted Research and University of Bristol, UK; Graham A. McAuliffe, Rothamsted Research, UK; and Michael R. F. Lee, Rothamsted Research and University of Bristol, UK 
5.Using life cycle assessment to compare intensive versus extensive agricultural systems: Matthias Meier, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
 
Part 2 Modelling particular impacts 
6.Modelling impacts of agriculture on freshwater: Stephan Pfister, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; and Sandra Payen, CIRAD, France and AgResearch, New Zealand 
7.Modelling the environmental impacts of pesticides in agriculture: Peter Fantke, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
8.Assessing socio-economic impacts of agriculture: Bo P. Weidema, Aalborg University, Denmark 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
9.Improvement options for agricultural crop production for food, feed and bioenergy: Benoît Gabrielle, AgroParisTech and Université Paris-Saclay, France; and Pietro Goglio, Wageningen University, The Netherlands and Cranfield University, UK 
10.Improving the environmental performance of horticultural production: fruits and vegetables: Cornelius Adewale and David Granatstein, Washington State University, USA 
11.Improving the environmental performance of pig and poultry production: Ben Putman, Martin Christie and Greg Thoma, University of Arkansas, USA 
12.The environmental impact of valorising agricultural by-products: Jerke de Vries and Rik Eweg, Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786762283 ¦ Pub date: August 2019 ¦ Extent: 386 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Improving organic crop cultivation Edited by Professor Ulrich Köpke 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Crop breeding and cultivation 
1.Key issues in breeding and trialling robust cereal cultivars for organic farming: H. Spieß, B. Schmehe and C. Vollenweider, LBS Dottenfelderhof, Germany 
2.Organic seed production, certification and availability: Steven P. C. Groot, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; and Maaike H. J. E. Raaijmakers, Bionext, The Netherlands 
3.Maintaining soil fertility and health in organic crop cultivation: C. Watson, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), UK and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; and E. A. Stockdale, Head of Farming Systems Research, NIAB, UK 
4.Cover crops in organic crop cultivation: Peter von Fragstein und Niemsdorff, Universität Kassel, Germany 
5.The role of crop rotations in organic farming: Bernhard Freyer, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Austria 
6.Conservation tillage in organic farming: Maike Krauss and Paul Mäder, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland; Joséphine Peigné, ISARA-Lyon, France; and Julia Cooper, Newcastle University, UK 
7.Manure management in organic farming: Peter Sørensen, Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Denmark; Luca Bechini, University of Milan, Italy; and Lars Stoumann Jensen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
8.Organic fertilizers and biofertilizers; Lidia Sas Paszt and Slawomir Gluszek, Research Institute of Horticulture, Poland 
9.Improving water management in organic crop cultivation: Michael J. Goss, University of Guelph, Canada; Adrian Unc, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada; and Wilfried Ehlers, Georg-August University, Germany 
 
Part 2 Crop pests and diseases 
10.Disease and pest management in organic farming: a case for applied agroecology: M. R. Finckh, S. M. Junge, J. H. Schmidt and O. D. Weedon, Universität Kassel, Germany 
11.Direct plant protection in organic farming: Bernhard Speiser, Hans-Jakob Schärer and Lucius Tamm, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
12.Integrated weed management in organic crop cultivation: Paolo Bàrberi, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy 
 
Part 3 Standards and monitoring 
13.Setting and reviewing standards for organic farming: Susanne Padel, The Organic Research Centre, UK 
14.Measuring and improving the environmental performance of organic farming: A. Muller, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) and Institute for Environmental Decisions, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland; M. Meier and C. Schader, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland; A. Gattinger, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Germany; and M. Steffens, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
15.Eco-functional intensification of organic farming; Thomas F. Döring, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Biodiversity as a prerequisite of sustainable organic farming: Lukas Pfiffner and Laura Armengot, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Switzerland 
17.The impact of organic agriculture on diet and health: Kirsten Brandt, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Part 4 Organic crop cultivation in the developing world 
18.Supporting smallholders in organic crop cultivation: the case of East Africa: R. Onwonga, University of Nairobi, Kenya; K. P. Sibuga, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; H. Nduku, University of Nairobi, Kenya; L. Sigsgaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; A. Saria and L. Shechambo, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; M. M. Caceres, Tanzania Official Seed Certification Institute of the Ministry of Agriculture, Tanzania; C. Chepkoech, Q. Genga and R. Wahome, University of Nairobi, Kenya; N. Halberg, Aarhus University, Denmark; and H. Høgh-Jensen, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
19.Improving organic agriculture in the developing world: Africa: Victor Olowe, Institute of Food Security, Environmental Resources and Agricultural Research (IFSERAR), Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (FUNAAB), Nigeria 
20.Improving organic agriculture in the developing world: Asia: Sang Mok Sohn, Dankook University, South Korea 
21.Organic agriculture and agroecology in Latin America: Roberto Ugas, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Peru 
ISBN: 9781786761842 ¦ Pub date: November 2018 ¦ Extent: 480 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Postharvest 

Advances in ensuring the microbiological safety of fresh produce By Professor Karl R. Matthews, Rutgers University, USA 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Pathogenic risks 
1.Advances in understanding contamination of fresh produce by Salmonella: Shirley Micallef, University of Maryland, USA 
2.Advances in understanding contamination of fresh produce by Listeria: Wei Zhang, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA 
3.Advances in understanding contamination of fresh produce by pathogenic Escherichia coli: Karl R. Matthews, Rutgers University, USA 
 
Part 2 Surveillance, detection and risk assessment 
4.Advances in surveillance and epidemiology of foodborne diseases: Tine Hald, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark 
5.Developments in rapid detection/high throughput screening techniques for identifying pathogens in food: Chunlei Shi, Shanghai Jiao Tung University, China 
6.Advances in modelling pathogen behaviour in fresh produce: Panagiotis Skandamis, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece 
7.Advances in microbiological risk assessment (MRA) for pathogens in fresh produce: Don Schaffner, Rutgers University, USA 
 
Part 3 Improving safety along the value chain 
8.Advances in understanding sources of pathogenic contamination of fresh produce: soil and soil amendments: Kali Kniel, University of Delaware, USA 
9.The role of good agricultural practices (GAP) in preventing pathogenic contamination of fresh produce: Elizabeth Bihn, Cornell University, USA 
10.Advances in sanitising techniques and their assessment for assuring the safety of fresh produce: Keith Warriner, University of Guelph, Canada 
11.Developments in packaging techniques and their assessment for assuring the safety of fresh produce: Jinhe Bai, USDA-ARS, USA 
12.The role of good manufacturing practice (GMP) and hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems in maintaining the safety of minimally-processed fresh produce: Carol Ann Wallace, University of Central Lancashire, UK 
13.Improving safe consumer handling of fresh produce: Jennifer Quinlan, Drexel University, USA 
ISBN: 9781801462686 ¦ Pub date: May 2023 ¦ Extent: 350 pages ¦ Price £145/$190/€175 

Developing smart agri-food supply chains Edited by Professor Louise Manning 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Tracking and traceability 
1.Advances in traceability systems in agri-food supply chains: Samantha Islam, University of Cambridge, UK; Louise Manning, Royal Agricultural University, UK; and Jonathan M. Cullen, University of Cambridge, UK 
2.Advances in fingerprint and rapid methods for improved traceability in agri-food supply chains: Daniel Cozzolino, Heather E. Smyth and Yasmina Sultanbawa, ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Uniquely Australian Foods and Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, Australia 
3.Advances in identifying GM plants: current frame of the detection of transgenic GMOs: Yves Bertheau, INRA Honorary Directeur de recherche, Honorary Scientist at Centre d’Ecologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CESCO), Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Sorbonne Université, France 
4.Advances in identifying GM plants: toward the routine detection of 'hidden' and 'new' GMOs: Yves Bertheau, INRA Honorary Directeur de recherche, Honorary Scientist at Centre d’Ecologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CESCO), Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Sorbonne Université, France 
 
Part 2 Product integrity and malicious contamination 
5.Foodomics: Advances in product testing in agri-food supply chains: Louise Manning, Royal Agricultural University, UK 
6.Key challenges and developments in non-targeted methods or systems to identify food adulteration: Sara Erasmus and Saskia van Ruth, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
7.Advances in identifying and tracking malicious contamination of food in agri-food supply chains: Marta Marmiroli, University of Parma, Italy; and Jason C. White, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, USA 
8.The role of technology in crisis management and product recall in food supply chains: Louise Manning, Royal Agricultural University, UK; and Aleksandra Kowalska, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Poland 
 
Part 3 Safety, quality and smart systems 
9.Sampling and statistics in assessment of fresh produce: K. B. Walsh, Central Queensland University, Australia; and V. A. McGlone and M. Wohlers, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, New Zealand 
10.Developing decision support systems for crop yield forecasts: Lin Liu, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, USA; and Bruno Basso, Michigan State University, USA 
11.Smart post-harvest technology to maintain quality and safety in fresh produce supply chains: James Monaghan, Harper Adams University, UK 
12.Advances in techniques for identifying and tracking foreign bodies in agri-food supply chains: Ilija Djekic, University of Belgrade, Serbia 
13.The use of Internet of Things (IoT) technology to improve transparency in agri-food supply chains: Rounaq Nayak, Harper Adams University, UK 
14.Drivers of farmers’ usage of digital marketplace platform: evidence from India: Arpita Agnihotri, Penn State Harrisburg, USA; and Saurabh Bhattacharya, Newcastle University Business School, UK 
ISBN: 9781786767493 ¦ Pub date: December 2021 ¦ Extent: 460 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in postharvest management of cereals and grains Edited by Professor Dirk E. Maier 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Postharvest losses and their causes 
1.Post-harvest losses of cereals and other grains: key issues and challenges: Steve Sonka, University of Illinois, USA 
2.Advances in understanding fungal contamination of cereals: Kizito Nishimwe, Iowa State University, USA and University of Rwanda, Rwanda; Julie Aiza L. Mandap, Iowa State University, USA and University of The Philippines Los Baños, The Philippines; and Gary P. Munkvold, Iowa State University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding postharvest insect pests affecting cereal grains: David Schlipalius and Paul Ebert, University of Queensland, Australia 
4.Advances in understanding rodent pests affecting cereal grains: Peter R. Brown, CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Australia; Grant R. Singleton, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines; Steven R. Belmain, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK; Nyo Me Htwe, Plant Protection Division – Myanma Agriculture Service, Myanmar; Loth Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; Mashaka Mdangi, Ministry of Agriculture, Tanzania; and Regino Cavia, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina 
 
Part 2 Storage technologies 
5.Advances in bulk storage of cereal grains: Michelle A. Friedmann and Dirk E. Maier, Iowa State University, USA 
6.Developments in the use of hermetic bags in grain storage: Dieudonne Baributsa, Purdue University, USA; and Ma Cristine Concepcion Ignacio, Iowa State University, USA and University of the Philippines Los Baños, The Philippines 
7.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: detection and monitoring: Paul Fields, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; Fuji Jian, University of Manitoba, Canada; and Dianxuan Wang, Henan University of Technology, China 
8.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: use of controlled atmosphere/temperature control: Shlomo Navarro and Hagit Navarro, Green Storage Ltd., Israel 
9.Biologically-based control strategies for managing stored-product insect pests: Benjamin Fürstenau and Garnet Marlen Kroos, Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Germany 
10.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: novel techniques: Peter Follett, USDA-ARS, USA; Georgios Akepsimaidis and Nicolas Meneses, Bühler AG, Switzerland; and Matthew Murdoch and Heidi Kotilainen, Bühler UK Limited, UK 
11.Advances in postharvest detection and control of fungal contamination of cereals: Naresh Magan, Esther Garcia-Cela, Carol Verheecke-Vaessen and Angel Medina, Cranfield University, UK 
12.Advances in techniques for monitoring the quality of stored cereal grains: Roger G. Aby and Dirk E. Maier, Iowa State University, USA 
13.Supporting smallholders in the developing world improve postharvest management of cereal grains: Brighton M. Mvumi, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe; and Tanya Stathers, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK 
ISBN: 9781786763525 ¦ Pub date: August 2020 ¦ Extent: 478 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in postharvest management of horticultural produce Edited by Professor Chris Watkins 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Preservation techniques 
1.Advances in cooling technologies to preserve horticultural produce: J. R. Olatunji and A. R. East, Massey University, New Zealand 
2.Advances in controlled atmosphere storage of horticultural produce: John DeLong, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Robert Prange, Dalhousie University, Canada 
3.Advances in modified atmosphere and active packaging of horticultural produce: Jeffrey S. Brandenburg, The JSB Group LLC, USA 
4.Advances in the use of barrier coatings and additives in the preservation of fresh horticultural produce: Elizabeth A. Baldwin, formerly USDA-ARS, USA; and Jeffrey K. Brecht,University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Safety management and disinfection techniques 
5.Post-harvest risk management of biological hazards encountered in horticultural produce: Keith Warriner and Mahdiyeh Hasani, University of Guelph, Canada 
6.Advances in understanding pathogens contaminating horticultural produce: P. Truchado, A. Allende and M. I. Gil, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain 
7.Advances in postharvest sanitizing regimes for horticultural produce: Joshua B. Gurtler, Xuetong Fan, Tony Jin and Brendan A. Niemira, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Advances in using heat for disinfection/disinfestation of horticultural produce:Elazar Fallik and Susan Lurie, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center (ARO), Israel; and Lisa Jamieson and Allan Woolf, The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, New Zealand 
9.Advances in the use of irradiation for the market access of fresh horticultural produce: John Golding and Sukhvinder Pal Singh, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia 
10.Advances in the potential use of non-thermal plasma in postharvest treatment of fresh horticultural produce: Sukhvinder Pal Singh and John Golding, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia 
11.Advances in the use of ozone in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Marcin Glowacz, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK 
12.Advances in the use of biological control agents in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Samir Droby, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center (ARO), Israel; Michael Wisniewski, USDA-ARS, USA; and Davide Spadaro, University of Torino, Italy 
 
Part 3 Monitoring and management 
13.Monitoring postharvest attributes: instrumental techniques for measuring harvest maturity/fruit quality: Kerry B. Walsh and Nicholas T. Anderson, Central Queensland University, Australia 
14.Postharvest handling of organically produced specialty crops: Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Chris Gunter and Marlee Trandel, North Carolina State University, USA 
15.Smart distribution to maintain shelf life of horticultural produce: J. K. Brecht, University of Florida, USA; I. Uysal and M. C. N. Nunes, University of South Florida, USA; J. P. Emond, The Illuminate Group, USA; S. Mercier, Décathlon Canada, Canada; and U. McCarthy, Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland 
ISBN: 9781786762887 ¦ Pub date: January 2020 ¦ Extent: 464 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Crop management 

Advances in plant factories: New technologies in indoor vertical farming By Emeritus Professor Toyoki Kozai and Dr Eri Hayashi 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Introduction 
1.Plant factories: Introduction: Toyoki Kozai, Chiba University/Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
2.Classification and definitions of vertical farms and plant factories: scope and perspectives: Toyoki Kozai, Chiba University/Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
3.The concept and requirements of sustainable plant factories: Toyoki Kozai, Chiba University/Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
4.Advances in vertical farming research in Europe: Leo Marcelis, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
5.Lessons learned from existing and shuttered vertical farms: Francis Baumont De Oliviera, University of Liverpool, UK 
 
Part 2 Energy and other resource performance 
6.Environmental assessment of urban vertical farms: Michael Martin, Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden 
7.Optimizing energy and other resource use in vertical farms: Francesco Orsini, University of Bologna, Italy 
8.Closed plant production systems in vertical farms for a circular economy: Yoshiaki Kitaya, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan 
9.Modeling energy use in plant factories with artificial lighting (PFALs) towards a sustainable future: Neil Mattson, Cornell University, USA 
 
Part 3 Phenotyping and plant health/disease sensing 
10.Application of machine vision in plant factories: Wei Ma, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
11.Plant phenotyping in plant factories for growth analysis of individual plants: Eri Hayashi, Vice President - Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
 
Part 4 Spectral manipulations for controlling the growth and quality of leafy greens 
12.Growth and quality control of leaf lettuce plants by red/far-red/blue light ratios at different planting densities in vertical farms: Wenqing Jin, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
13.Spectral manipulations to control growth and quality of lettuce and other leafy greens in vertical farms: Yuxin Tong, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
14.Adjusting photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) to improve lettuce nutritional quality and shelf life in vertical farms: Qianxixi Min, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
 
Part 5 Spectral manipulations for controlling the growth and quality of ornamentals, fruit vegetables, herbs and head vegetables 
15.Effect of far-red light on yield improvement of vertically-farmed tomato plants: Yongran Ji, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
16.Nutritional components of herbs, edible flowers and medicinal plants as affected by light and rootzone environments in vertical farms: Na Lu, Chiba University, Japan 
17.Using LED for processing and post-harvest quality control of vertically-farmed head vegetables: Yumiko Amagai, Chiba University, Japan 
 
Part 6 Business case studies 
18.Design and management of globally/locally-networked plant factories and their application in business: Pavlos Kalaitzoglou, Infarm, Germany 
19.Oishii Farm: gaining the leading edge in the plant factory business and looking ahead: Hiroki Koga, Oishii Farm, USA 
20.808 Factory: data-driven operation for a productive and sustainable plant factory: Katashi Kai, 808 Factory, Japan 
21.Design and management of industrial-scale vertical farms: Lawrence Ross, Intelligent Growth Solutions (IGS), UK 
 
Part 7 Conclusions 
22.Plant factories: Conclusions: Eri Hayashi, Vice President - Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
ISBN: 9781801463164 ¦ Pub date: June 2023 ¦ Extent: 500 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Advances in horticultural soilless culture Edited by Professor Nazim Gruda 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Soilless culture systems and growing media in horticulture: a overview: Nazim Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
 
Part 1 Materials 
2.Advances in understanding plant root behaviour and rootzone management in soilless culture systems: Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph, Canada 
3.Developments in inorganic materials, synthetic organic materials and peat in soilless culture systems: Jeb S. Fields, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, USA; and Nazim S. Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
4.Developments in alternative organic materials for growing media in soilless culture systems: Nazim S. Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany; and Neil Bragg, Substrate Associates Ltd, United Kingdom 
5.Understanding and optimizing the physical properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Jean Caron, Université Laval, Canada; and Jean-Charles Michel, L’Institut Agro, France 
6.Understanding and optimising the chemical properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Patrizia Zaccheo and Laura Crippa, University of Milan, Italy; and Francesco Giuffrida, University of Catania, Italy 
7.Understanding and optimising the biological properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Francesco Giuffrida and Rosario Paolo Mauro, University of Catania, Italy; and Patrizia Zaccheo, University of Milan, Italy 
 
Part 2 Technologies 
8.Advances in liquid- and solid-medium soilless culture systems: Yüksel Tüzel, Ege University, Turkey; and Astrit Balliu, Agricultural University of Tirana, Albania 
9.Advances in irrigation/fertigation techniques in greenhouse soilless culture systems (SCS): Georgios Nikolaou and Damianos Neocleous, Ministry of Agriculture, Rural Development and Environment, Cyprus; and Evangelini Kitta and Nikolaos Katsoulas, University of Thessaly, Greece 
10.Advances in nutrient management modelling and nutrient concentration prediction for soilless culture systems: Jung Eek Son, Tae In Ahn and Taewon Moon, Seoul National University, Korea 
11.Advanced hydroponics design for plant cultivation in cities: Giuseppina Pennisi, Alessandro Pistillo, Elisa Appolloni, Francesco Orsini and Giorgio Gianquinto, DISTAL – University of Bologna, Italy 
12.Optimizing product quality in soilless culture systems (SCS): Pietro Santamaria, Barbara De Lucia and Angelo Signore, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
13.Advances in soilless cultivation of tomatoes and other fruit vegetables: V. Truffault, Futura Gaïa, France; and E. Legast, Centre Technique Interprofessionnel des Fruits et Légumes (CTIFL), France 
14.Advances in soilless culture strawberry production: Mike Nichols, formerly Massey University, New Zealand 
15.Advances in soilless culture of ornamentals: Erik van Os and Arca Kromwijk, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786764355 ¦ Pub date: February 2021 ¦ Extent: 442 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Biostimulants for sustainable crop production Edited by Youssef Rouphael, Patrick du Jardin, Patrick Brown, Stefania De Pascale and Giuseppe Colla 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Introduction and biostimulant characterization 
1.Plant biostimulants: a new paradigm for the sustainable intensification of crops: Patrick du Jardin, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech – University of Liège, Belgium 
2.Bioactive compounds and evaluation of biostimulant activity: Luigi Lucini and Begoña Miras-Moreno, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy; and Andrea Ertani, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italy 
 
Part 2 Non-microbial and microbial categories of biostimulants 
3.Humic substances (HS) as plant biostimulants in agriculture: Andrea Ertani, Università degli Studi di Padova and Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy; and Michela Schiavon and Serenella Nardi, Università degli Studi di Padova, Italy 
4.Seaweed extracts as plant biostimulants in agriculture: Izabela Michalak, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland; Katarzyna Tyśkiewicz, Marcin Konkol and Edward Rój, New Chemical Syntheses Institute, Poland; and Katarzyna Chojnacka, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland 
5.Biostimulant action of protein hydrolysates on crops: Giuseppe Colla, University of Tuscia, Italy; Youssef Rouphael, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; Mariateresa Cardarelli, Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia agraria, Centro di ricerca Orticoltura e Florovivaismo, Italy; Luigi Lucini, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy; and Andrea Ertani, University of Turin, Italy 
6.Silicon as a biostimulant in agriculture: Wendy Zellner, The University of Toledo, USA; and Lawrence Datnoff, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, USA 
7.Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) as plant biostimulants in agriculture: Dongmei Lya, Rachel Backer and Donald Smith, McGill University, Canada 
8.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as biostimulants for sustainable crop production: Michael Bitterlich, Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Germany; Louis Mercy and Miguel Arato, INOQ GmbH, Germany; and Philipp Franken, Erfurt Research Centre for Horticultural Crops, University of Applied Sciences Erfurt and Institute of Microbiology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany 
 
Part 3 Innovation and practical applications 
9.Designing and formulating microbial and non-microbial biostimulants: Paolo Bonini, NGAlab, Spain; Veronica Cirino, Atens Agrotecnologias Naturales S.L., Spain; Helene Reynaud, Italpollina USA, USA; Youssef Rouphael, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; Mariateresa Cardarelli, CREA, Centro di ricerca Orticoltura e Florovivaismo, Italy; and Giuseppe Colla, University of Tuscia, Italy 
10.Plant biostimulants and their influence on nutrient use efficiency (NUE): Patrick H. Brown, Douglas C. Amaral, Meerae Park, Jennifer Schmidt and Amelie Gaudin, University of California-Davis, USA 
11.Combining plant biostimulants and precision agriculture: Raffaele Casa, University of Tuscia, Italy; Davide Cammarano, Purdue University, USA; Domenico Ronga, CREA, Italy; and Giuseppe Cillo, University of Teramo, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786763365 ¦ Pub date: July 2020 ¦ Extent: 386 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable crop nutrition Edited by Professor Zed Rengel 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Primary macronutrients: nitrogen 
1.Advances in understanding the nitrogen cycle in crop production: David Pilbeam, University of Leeds, UK 
2.Advances in understanding uptake and utilization of nitrogen in wheat: Ajit S. Nehe and M. John Foulkes, University of Nottingham, UK 
3.Advances in optimising nitrogen-use efficiency in crop production: J. F. Angus, CSIRO Agriculture and Food and Graham Centre – Charles Sturt University, Australia 
 
Part 2 Primary macronutrients: phosphorus 
4.Advances in understanding crop use of phosphorus: Timothy S. George and Philip J. White, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
5.Advances in understanding the environmental effects of phosphorus fertilization: Andrew N. Sharpley, University of Arkansas, USA 
6.Enhancing phosphorus-use efficiency in crop production: J. L. Havlin, North Carolina State University, USA; and A. J. Schlegel, Kansas State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Primary macronutrients: potassium 
7.Advances in understanding the potassium cycle in crop production: Qifu Ma and Richard Bell, Murdoch University, Australia 
8.Potassium in crop physiology: Philip J. White, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
9.Advances in optimizing potassium-use efficiency in crop production: Kaushik Majumdar, African Plant Nutrition Institute and Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Morocco; Meenu Rani, formerly ICAR-Indian Institute of Farming Systems Research, India; T. Scott Murrell, African Plant Nutrition Institute and Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Morocco and Purdue University, USA; Sudarshan Dutta, African Plant Nutrition Institute and Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Morocco; T. Satyanarayana, formerly International Plant Nutrition Institute, India; V. K. Singh, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India; Jagadish Timsina, University of Melbourne, Australia and CIMMYT, Bangladesh; and B. S. Dwivedi, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
 
Part 4 Secondary macronutrients and micronutrients 
10.Secondary macronutrients: advances in understanding calcium cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimizing calcium-use efficiency in crop production: Milan Mesic, Zeljka Zgorelec, Aleksandra Percin, Igor Bogunovic and Darija Bilandzija, University of Zagreb, Croatia 
11.The effect of soil organic matter on plant mineral nutrition: O. Urrutia, J. Erro, M. Fuentes, M. Olaetxea and M. Garnica, University of Navarra, Spain; R. Baigorri, TIMAC AGRO, UK; A. M. Zamarreño, M. Movila and D. De Hita, University of Navarra, Spain; and J. M. Garcia-Mina, University of Navarra, Spain and Centre Mondial De L’Innovation Roullier, France 
12.Advances in understanding iron cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimising iron-use efficiency in crop production: Yashbir Singh Shivay and Sunil Mandi, ICAR – Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
13.Current advances in zinc in soils and plants: implications for zinc efficiency and biofortification studies: Gokhan Hacisalihoglu, Florida A&M University, USA; and Matthew W. Blair, Tennessee State University, USA 
14.Advances in understanding boron cycling in soils, uptake/use by plants and ways of optimizing boron use efficiency in crop production: Heiner E. Goldbach, University of Bonn, Germany 
15.Micronutrients: advances in understanding manganese cycling in soils, acquisition by plants and ways of optimizing manganese efficiency in crops: Sidsel Birkelund Schmidt and Søren Husted, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
16.Micronutrients: advances in understanding molybdenum in crop production: Aruna Nandety and Ali M. Missaoui, University of Georgia-Athens, USA 
 
Part 5 Optimising fertilizer use 
17.Advances in assessing nutrient availability in soils: Frederikke N. Mikkelsen, Maria M. Rieckmann and Kristian H. Laursen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
18.Advances in integrated plant nutrient management: Bijay-Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India; and Ali M. Ali, Desert Research Center, Egypt 
19.Developments in the use of fertilizers: Bryan G. Hopkins, Brigham Young University, USA 
20.Bio-effectors to optimize the mineral nutrition of crop plants: Markus Weinmann and Günter Neumann, University Hohenheim, Germany 
21.Advances in fertigation techniques to optimize crop nutrition: Asher Bar-Tal, Uri Yermiyahu and Alon Ben-Gal, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Israel 
22.Advances in foliar fertilizers to optimize crop nutrition: Victoria Fernández, Technical University of Madrid, Spain; and Héctor A. Bahamonde, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA), Argentina 
23.Optimizing the use of treated wastes in crop nutrition: Sylvia Kratz, Kerstin Panten, Ewald Schnug and Elke Bloem, Julius Kühn-Institute, Germany 
ISBN: 9781786763129 ¦ Pub date: February 2020 ¦ Extent: 830 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable greenhouse cultivation Edited by Professor Leo Marcelis and Dr Ep Heuvelink 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Achieving sustainable greenhouse production: present status, recent advances and future developments: Leo F. M. Marcelis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Joaquim Miguel Costa, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal; and Ep Heuvelink, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 1 Production systems 
2.Advances in greenhouse design: Juan I. Montero, formerly Institut de Recerca i Tecnología Agroalimentaries, Spain; and Yi Zhang, Qichang Yang and Xinglin Ke, Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture, China 
3.Advances in screenhouse design and practice for protected cultivation: Josef Tanny, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center, Israel 
4.Aquaponic systems for crop cultivation: B. W. Alsanius and S. Khalil, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden; A. Tadesse, Debre Berhan University, Ethiopia; A. K. Rosberg, K. J. Bergstrand, R. Hartmann, L. Mogren, M. Alam, M. Grudén and T. Naznin, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden; and A. Getahun, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia 
5.Advances in organic greenhouse cultivation: Martine Dorais, Université Laval, Canada 
6.Towards sustainable plant factories with artificial lighting (PFALs): from greenhouses to vertical farms: Toyoki Kozai, Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan; Yumiko Amagai, Chiba University, Japan; and Eri Hayashi, Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
 
Part 2 Crop management 
7.Understanding crop responses to controlled climates in greenhouses: Chieri Kubota, The Ohio State University, USA 
8.Developments in growing substrates for greenhouse cultivation: Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph, Canada 
9.Advances in irrigation management in greenhouse cultivation: Stefania De Pascale, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; Luca Incrocci, University of Pisa, Italy; Daniele Massa, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Italy; Youssef Rouphael, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; and Alberto Pardossi, University of Pisa, Italy 
10.Advances in nutrient management in greenhouse cultivation: Neil S. Mattson, Cornell University, USA; and Christopher J. Currey, Iowa State University, USA 
11.Advances in pest and disease management in greenhouse cultivation: Gerben J. Messelink and H. Marjolein Kruidhof, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
 
Part 3 System management 
12.Automation and robotics in greenhouses: E. J. van Henten, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
13.Models, sensors and decision support systems in greenhouse cultivation: Oliver Körner, Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ), Germany 
14.Assessing the impact of environmental factors on the quality of greenhouse produce: Nazim Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
15.Sustainable use of energy in greenhouses: S. Hemming, J. C. Bakker, J. B. Campen and F. L. K. Kempkes, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
16.Assessing the environmental impact of greenhouse cultivation: Assumpció Antón, Erica Montemayor and Nancy Peña, Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA), Spain 
ISBN: 9781786762801 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 538 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Cereals 

Advances in understanding insect pests affecting wheat and other cereals Edited by Professor Sanford Eigenbrode and Dr Arash Rashed 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Aphid pests 
1.Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia): overview: Vicky Tolmay, Agricultural Research Council, South Africa 
2.Greenbug (Schizaphis graminum): overview: Tom Royer, Oklahoma State University, USA 
3.Greenbug (Schizaphis graminum): plant-insect interactions: Leonardo Crespo-Herrera, CIMMYT, Mexico 
4.Fescue aphid (Metopolophium festucae): Sanford Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, USA 
5.English grain aphid (Sitobion avenae): Deguang Liu, State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas - Northwest A&F University, China 
 
Part 2 Gall midges 
6.Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor): plant-pathogen interactions: Subhashree Subramanyam, USDA-ARS, USA 
7.Orange Blossom wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana): Gadi Reddy, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Wheat curl mite (Aceria tulipae): Gary Hein, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
 
Part 3 Other pests 
9.Wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus): David Weaver, Montana State University, USA 
10.Cereal leaf beetle (Oulema melanopus): Ted Evans, Utah State University, USA 
11.Wireworms (Elateridae): Arash Rashed, University of Idaho, USA 
12.Grasshoppers: Robert Srygley, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 4 Emerging issues 
13.Newly invasive insect pests of wheat: Michael Brewer, Texas A&M University, USA 
14.Biotechnology for wheat crop protection: potential and challenges: Ann-Marie Botha, Stellenbosch University , South Africa 
15.On-line decision support systems, remote sensing and AI applications for wheat pests: Daniel Leybourne, ADAS, UK 
ISBN: 9781801461139 ¦ Pub date: February 2023 ¦ Extent: 440 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Developing drought-resistant cereals Edited by Professor Roberto Tuberosa 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Understanding mechanisms of drought tolerance 
1.Physiological traits affecting water use and water use efficiency in cereals in response to drought stress: Thomas Sinclair, North Carolina State University, USA 
2.The role of growth regulators in regulating tolerance to drought stress in cereals: Bill Davies, University of Lancaster, UK 
3.The role of drought stress-induced proteins in regulating drought resistance in cereals: John Cushman, University of Nevada-Reno, USA 
 
Part 2 Techniques for improving resistance 
4.Identifying and exploiting drought tolerance traits in wild cereals, varieties and landraces: Zvi Peleg, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel 
5.Advances in phenotyping to identify drought-resistance traits in cereal roots: Jack Christopher, University of Queensland, Australia 
6.Advanced genetic techniques to identify and evaluate drought-adaptive loci in cereals: Roberto Tuberosa, University of Bologna, Italy 
7.Identifying and exploiting genes related to root system architecture in improving drought resistance in cereals: Eric Ober, NIAB, UK 
8.Identifying and exploiting photosynthetic genes in improving drought resistance in cereals: Ruilian Jing, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
9.Genomic selection, genome editing and genetic engineering for drought resistance in cereals: Rodomiro Ortiz, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
ISBN: 9781786769855 ¦ Pub date: July 2023 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving durable disease resistance in cereals Edited by Professor Richard Oliver 

 
Table of contents 
 
1.Global patterns of cereal diseases and the impacts of breeding for host plant resistance: Serge Savary and Laetitia Willocquet, Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’alimentation et l’Environnement (INRAE), France 
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of cereals: rusts 
2.Advances in understanding the biology and epidemiology of rust diseases of cereals: Vanessa Bueno-Sancho, Clare M. Lewis and Diane G. O. Saunders, John Innes Centre, UK 
3.Advances in identifying stripe rust resistance genes in cereals: Tianheng Ren, Zhi Li, Feiquan Tan, Cheng Jiang and Peigao Luo, Sichuan Agricultural University, China 
 
Part 2 Fungal diseases of cereals: Fusarium head blight 
4.Advances in understanding the epidemiology of Fusarium in cereals: Stephen N. Wegulo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
5.Cereal-Fusarium interactions: Improved fundamental insights into Fusarium pathogenomics and cereal host resistance reveals new ways to achieve durable disease control: Claire Kanja, Ana K. Machado Wood, Laura Baggaley, Catherine Walker and Kim E. Hammond-Kosack, Rothamsted Research, UK 
6.Advances in genetic improvement of durable resistance to Fusarium head blight in wheat: Guihua Bai, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Fungal diseases of cereals: Septoria tritici blotch 
7.Advances in understanding the epidemiology of Septoria tritici blotch in cereals: Stephen B. Goodwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Understanding plant-pathogen interactions in Septoria tritici blotch infection of cereals: Y. Petit-Houdenot and M.-H. Lebrun, UMR Bioger, Université Paris Saclay, INRAE, AgroParistech, France; and G. Scalliet, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Switzerland 
9.Advances in breeding techniques for durable Septoria tritici blotch (STB) resistance in cereals: Harsh Raman, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Australia 
 
Part 4 Fungal diseases of wheat: Septoria nodorum blotch and spot blotch 
10.Understanding the plant-pathogen interaction associated with Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat: Gayan K. Kariyawasam, North Dakota State University, USA; and Timothy L. Friesen, Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Advances in genetic mapping of Septoria nodorum blotch resistance in wheat and applications in resistance breeding: Min Lin and Morten Lillemo, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
12.Advances in breeding techniques for durable resistance to spot blotch in cereals: Ramesh Chand, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India; Sudhir Navathe, Agharkar Research Institute, India; and Sandeep Sharma, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India 
 
Part 5 Fungal diseases of cereals: net blotch 
13.Advances in understanding the epidemiology, molecular biology and control of net blotch and the net blotch barley interaction: Anke Martin, Barsha Poudel and Buddhika Amarasinghe Dahanayaka, Centre for Crop Health, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Mark S. McLean, Agriculture Victoria, Victorian Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Tourism and Resources, Australia; Lisle Snyman, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; and Francisco J. Lopez-Ruiz, Centre for Crop and Disease Management, Curtin University, Australia 
14.Understanding plant–pathogen interactions in net blotch infection of cereals: Karl M. Effertz, Shaun J. Clare, Sarah M. Harkins and Robert S. Brueggeman, Washington State University, USA 
15.Breeding barley for durable resistance to net and spot forms of net blotch: Jerome D. Franckowiak, University of Minnesota, USA; and Gregory J. Platz, Hermitage Research Facility, Agri-Science Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 6 Fungal diseases of cereals: tan spot, blast and Ramularia 
16.Tan spot disease under the lenses of plant pathologists: Reem Aboukhaddour and Mohamed Hafez, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; Stephen E. Strelkov, University of Alberta, Canada; and Myriam R. Fernandez, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
17.Towards an early warning system for wheat blast: epidemiological basis and model development: J. M. Fernandes, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil; E. M. Del Ponte and J. P. Ascari, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil; T. J. Krupnik, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Bangladesh; W. Pavan, Universidade de Passo Fundo and SensorOn – Estrada do Trigo, Brazil; F. Vargas, SensorOn – Estrada do Trigo, Brazil; and T. Berton, Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil 
18.Investigating the biology of rice blast disease and prospects for durable resistance: Vincent M. Were and Nicholas J. Talbot, The Sainsbury Laboratory, University of East Anglia, UK 
19.Ramularia leaf spot in barley: Neil Havis, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK 
 
Part 7 Barley yellow dwarf virus 
20.Advances in understanding the biology and epidemiology of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV): Douglas Lau, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil; Talita Bernardon Mar, National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Fellow (CNPq) (Embrapa-CNPq), Brazil; Carlos Diego Ribeiro dos Santos, Postgraduate Program in Plant Science, Faculty of Agronomy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil; Eduardo Engel, Postgraduate Program in Entomology, University of São Paulo, Brazil; and Paulo Roberto do Valle da Silva Pereira, Embrapa Florestas, Brazil 
21.Resistance breeding in barley against Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV): avoiding negative impacts on anatomy and physiology: Torsten Will, Frank Ordon and Dragan Perovic, Julius Kühn- Institute (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Germany 
 
Part 8 Fungal diseases of cereals: Regional strategies 
22.Key challenges in breeding durable disease-resistant cereals: North America: Christina Cowger, USDA-ARS, USA 
23.Achievements in breeding cereals with durable disease resistance in Northwest Europe: James K. M. Brown, John Innes Centre, UK 
24.Key challenges in breeding durable disease-resistant cereals: North Africa and West Asia: Sarrah Ben M’Barek, Regional Field Crops Research Center of Béja and CRP Wheat Septoria Phenotyping Platform, Tunisia; and Seyed Mahmoud Tabib Ghaffary, Safiabad Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center (AREEO), Iran 
ISBN: 9781786766014 ¦ Pub date: October 2021 ¦ Extent: 970 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Improving the nutritional and nutraceutical properties of wheat and cereals Edited by Dr Trust Beta 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Nutritional properties of cereals 
1.Advances in understanding the nutritional value of starch in wheat: Senay Simsek and Jayani Kulathunga, North Dakota State University, USA; and Bahri Ozsisli, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey 
2.Advances in understanding the nutritional value of antioxidants in wheat: Franklin Brian Apea-Bah and Trust Beta, University of Manitoba, Canada 
3.Advances in understanding the nutritional value of lipids in wheat: Marina Carcea, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Italy 
4.Dietary fibers in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus: Ellen E. Blaak, Maastricht University, The Netherlands 
5.Fiber-associated wheat lignans and colorectal cancer prevention: Jingwen Xu, Shanghai Ocean University, China and Kansas State University, USA; and Weiqun Wang, Kansas State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Developing nutritionally-enhanced cereal products 
6.Advances in understanding the genetics of the nutritional properties of cereals: maize and oat proteins: Sachin Rustgi, Salman Naveed and Prasanna Shekar, Pee Dee Research and Education Center, Clemson University, USA 
7.Developments in fractionation methods to improve extraction of aleurone or its beneficial compounds from wheat grain: V. Lullien-Pellerin, IATE, Univ Montpellier, INRAE, Institut Agro, Montpellier, France 
8.Wheat flour fortification and human health: Helena Pachón, Food Fortification Initiative and Emory University, USA 
9.Developing hulled wheat-based cereal products with enhanced nutritional properties: emmer, einkorn and spelt: Dagmar Janovská and Petra Hlásná Čepková, Crop Research Institute, Czech Republic; Stefano D’Amico, Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, Austria; Andrea Brandolini, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Italy; and Heinrich Grausgruber, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Austria 
10.Understanding the nutritional and nutraceutical properties of sorghum: Sarah Cox, USDA-ARS, USA; Weiqun Wang, Kansas State University, USA; Seong-Ho Lee, University of Maryland, USA; and Dmitriy Smolensky, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Developing millet-based cereal products with enhanced nutritional properties: Kwaku G. Duodu, John Lubaale and Eugenie Kayitesi, University of Pretoria, South Africa 
ISBN: 9781786764479 ¦ Pub date: May 2021 ¦ Extent: 380 pages ¦ Price £145/$190/€175 

Advances in postharvest management of cereals and grains Edited by Professor Dirk E. Maier 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Postharvest losses and their causes 
1.Post-harvest losses of cereals and other grains: key issues and challenges: Steve Sonka, University of Illinois, USA 
2.Advances in understanding fungal contamination of cereals: Kizito Nishimwe, Iowa State University, USA and University of Rwanda, Rwanda; Julie Aiza L. Mandap, Iowa State University, USA and University of The Philippines Los Baños, The Philippines; and Gary P. Munkvold, Iowa State University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding postharvest insect pests affecting cereal grains: David Schlipalius and Paul Ebert, University of Queensland, Australia 
4.Advances in understanding rodent pests affecting cereal grains: Peter R. Brown, CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Australia; Grant R. Singleton, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines; Steven R. Belmain, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK; Nyo Me Htwe, Plant Protection Division – Myanma Agriculture Service, Myanmar; Loth Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania; Mashaka Mdangi, Ministry of Agriculture, Tanzania; and Regino Cavia, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina 
 
Part 2 Storage technologies 
5.Advances in bulk storage of cereal grains: Michelle A. Friedmann and Dirk E. Maier, Iowa State University, USA 
6.Developments in the use of hermetic bags in grain storage: Dieudonne Baributsa, Purdue University, USA; and Ma Cristine Concepcion Ignacio, Iowa State University, USA and University of the Philippines Los Baños, The Philippines 
7.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: detection and monitoring: Paul Fields, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; Fuji Jian, University of Manitoba, Canada; and Dianxuan Wang, Henan University of Technology, China 
8.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: use of controlled atmosphere/temperature control: Shlomo Navarro and Hagit Navarro, Green Storage Ltd., Israel 
9.Biologically-based control strategies for managing stored-product insect pests: Benjamin Fürstenau and Garnet Marlen Kroos, Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Germany 
10.Advances in insect pest management in postharvest storage of cereals: novel techniques: Peter Follett, USDA-ARS, USA; Georgios Akepsimaidis and Nicolas Meneses, Bühler AG, Switzerland; and Matthew Murdoch and Heidi Kotilainen, Bühler UK Limited, UK 
11.Advances in postharvest detection and control of fungal contamination of cereals: Naresh Magan, Esther Garcia-Cela, Carol Verheecke-Vaessen and Angel Medina, Cranfield University, UK 
12.Advances in techniques for monitoring the quality of stored cereal grains: Roger G. Aby and Dirk E. Maier, Iowa State University, USA 
13.Supporting smallholders in the developing world improve postharvest management of cereal grains: Brighton M. Mvumi, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe; and Tanya Stathers, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK 
ISBN: 9781786763525 ¦ Pub date: August 2020 ¦ Extent: 478 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of barley Edited by Professor Glen Fox and Professor Chengdao Li 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and genetics 
1.Advances in understanding of barley plant physiology: plant development and architecture: Andrea Visioni, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
2.Advances in understanding barley plant physiology: responses to abiotic stress: Alessandro Tondelli, Cristina Crosatti, Stefano Delbono and Luigi Cattivelli, CREA Research Centre for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Italy 
3.Advances in the understanding of barley plant physiology: factors determining grain development, composition and chemistry: Ljudmilla Borisjuk, Hardy Rolletschek and Volodymyr Radchuk, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
4.Exploring barley germplasm for yield improvement under sulphur limiting environments: Tefera Tolera Angessa, Murdoch University, Australia; Kefei Chen, Curtin University, Australia; David Farleigh, Jenifer Bussanich and Lee-Anne McFawn, Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development-Western Australia, Australia; Kevin Whitfield, CSBP Limited, Australia; Brendon Weir, Mullewa, Australia; Steve Cosh, Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development-Western Australia, Australia; Achalu Chimdi, Gudeta Nepir Gurmu and Tadesse Kenea Amentae, Ambo University, Ethiopia; and Chengdao Li, Murdoch University, Australia 
5.Mapping and exploiting the barley genome: techniques for mapping genes and relating them to desirable traits: Hélène Pidon and Nils Stein, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
 
Part 2 Advances in breeding 
6.Advanced designs for barley breeding experiments: Alison Kelly, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Australia; and Clayton Forknall, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
7.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for barley: genome-wide association studies (GWAS): W. T. B. Thomas, James Hutton Institute, UK 
8.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for barley: targeted induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING): Serena Rosignoli and Silvio Salvi, University of Bologna, Italy 
 
Part 3 Cultivation techniques, pest and disease management 
9.Advances in postharvest storage and handling of barley: methods to prevent or reduce mycotoxin contamination: Zhao Jin and Paul Schwarz, North Dakota State University, USA 
10.Fungal diseases affecting barley: Robert S. Brueggeman, Shyam Solanki, Gazala Ameen and Karl Effertz, Washington State University, USA; Roshan Sharma Poudel, North Dakota State University, USA; and Aziz Karakaya, Ankara University, Turkey 
11.Integrated disease management of barley: Adrian C. Newton, James Hutton Institute and SRUC, UK; and Henry E. Creissen, Neil D. Havis, and Fiona J. Burnett, SRUC, UK 
12.Integrated weed management in barley cultivation: Michael Widderick, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
 
Part 4 Quality 
13.Developing barley crops for improved malt quality: Glen Fox, University of California–Davis, USA and The University of Queensland, Australia; and Reg Lance, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
14.Developing barley crops for improved brewing quality: Søren Knudsen, Finn Lok and Ilka Braumann, Carlsberg Research Laboratory, Denmark 
15.Optimising the use of barley as an animal feed: David M. E. Poulsen, Queensland University of Technology, Australia 
16.Nutritional and bioactive compounds in barley: Nancy Ames, Joanne Storsley, Lovemore Malunga and Sijo Joseph Thandapilly, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786763082 ¦ Pub date: February 2020 ¦ Extent: 528 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Advances in breeding techniques for cereal crops Edited by Professor Frank Ordon and Professor Wolfgang Friedt 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Exploiting genetic diversity 
1.Alien introgression and breeding of synthetic wheat: Wei Zhang and Xiwen Cai, North Dakota State University, USA 
2.Use of the secondary gene pool of barley in breeding improved varieties: Matthew Haas, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany; and Martin Mascher, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) and German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research, Germany 
3.Marker-assisted trait introgression for wheat breeding & research: Miguel Sanchez-Garcia, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco; and Alison Bentley, The John Bingham Laboratory, NIAB, UK 
 
Part 2 Double haploids (DH) 
4.Doubled haploid production in wheat: W. Tadesse, M. Sanchez-Garcia, S. Tawkaz and M. Baum, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
5.Doubled haploid (DH) production for barley: Benjamin Wittkop, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany; László Csélènyi, Saatzucht W. von Borries-Eckendorf, Germany 
6.Production of doubled haploid (DH) lines for hybrid breeding in maize: Willem S. Molenaar and Albrecht E. Melchinger, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
 
Part 3 Hybrid breeding 
7.Prerequisites, procedures and potential of hybrid breeding in wheat: Philipp H. G. Boeven and C. Friedrich H. Longin, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
8.Challenges and developments in hybrid breeding in barley: Timm Bernhard, Wolfgang Friedt and Benjamin Wittkop, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany 
9.Selection strategies in hybrid rye with special consideration of fungal disease resistances: Thomas Miedaner, University of Hohenheim, Germany; and Peer Wilde, KWS Lochow GmbH, Germany 
 
Part 4 High throughput phenotyping, genetic markers and QTL mapping 
10.Non-invasive phenotyping of cereal development: Andreas Hund, Lukas Kronenberg and Jonas Anderegg, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Kang Yu, KU Leuven, Belgium; and Achim Walter, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
11.Theory and application of phenotyping in wheat for different target environments: Matthew Reynolds and Francisco Pinto, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Mexico 
12.Development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for cereal breeding and crop research: current methods and future prospects: Carly Schramm, Yuri Shavrukov and Peter Anderson, Flinders University, Australia; and Akhylbek Kurishbaev and Satyvaldy Jatayev, S. Seifullin Kazakh AgroTechnical University, Kazahkstan 
13.Mapping and isolation of major resistance genes in cereals: Jan Bettgenhauser and Simon G. Krattinger, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia 
14.Leveraging the QTLome to enhance climate change resilience in cereals: Roberto Tuberosa, Marco Maccaferri and Silvio Salvi, University of Bologna, Italy 
15.Advances in statistical methods to handle large data sets for genome-wide association mapping in crop breeding: Boby Mathew, University of Bonn, Germany; Mikko J. Sillanpää, University of Oulu, Finland; and Jens Léon, University of Bonn, Germany 
16.Nested association mapping in barley to identify extractable trait genes: Andreas Maurer and Klaus Pillen, Martin-Luther-University Halle Wittenberg, Germany 
 
Part 5 Genome wide association studies and genomic selection 
17.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in wheat: Susanne Dreisigacker, CIMMYT, Mexico 
18.Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in barley: Ernesto Igartua, Carlos P. Cantalapiedra and Ana M. Casas, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Spain 
19.Genomic prediction in cereals: advantages and drawbacks: Patrick Thorwarth, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
20.Site-directed genome modification in barley and wheat breeding: Jochen Kumlehn, Stefan Hiekel and Nagaveni Budhagatapalli, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Germany 
ISBN: 9781786762443 ¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 612 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Integrated disease management of wheat and barley Edited by Professor Richard Oliver 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases of cereals 
1.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: rusts: R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia 
2.Fusarium diseases: biology and management perspectives: Edward C. Rojas, Hans J. L. Jørgensen, Birgit Jensen and David B. Collinge, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
3.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria tritici blotch: S. B. Goodwin, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Diseases affecting wheat and barley: powdery mildew: Javier Sánchez-Martín, Salim Bourras and Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland 
5.Diseases affecting wheat: tan spot: C. S. Moffat, Curtin University, Australia; and F. M. Santana, Embrapa Trigo, Brazil 
6.Diseases affecting wheat: Septoria nodorum blotch: A. K. Ruud and M. Lillemo, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway 
7.A lesser-known pathogen of wheat: Bipolaris sorokiniana: E. Hill and P. Solomon, The Australian National University, Australia 
8.Diseases affecting wheat: wheat blast: J. L. N. Maciel, Embrapa Wheat, Brazil 
9.Diseases affecting barley: net blotches: Simon R. Ellwood, Curtin University, Australia; and Hugh Wallwork, South Australian Research and Development Institute, Australia 
10.Diseases affecting barley: scald: Wolfgang Knogge, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Germany 
 
Part 2 Key challenges in integrated disease management of cereals 
11.Challenges and prospects for fungicidal control of wheat diseases: R. J. Bryson and Horst-Dieter Brix, BASF, Germany 
12.Occurrence and avoidance of fungicide resistance in cereal diseases: Lise Nistrup Jørgensen, Aarhus University, Denmark; Richard Peter Oliver, Curtin University, Australia; and Thies Marten Heick, Aarhus University, Denmark 
13.Trends in exploring wheat and barley germplasm for novel disease resistance traits: Sambasivam Periyannan, Australian National University, Australia; and Lee Hickey, University of Queensland, Australia 
14.Developments in diagnostic techniques for cereal pathogens: Sadia Iqbal and Michael G. K. Jones, Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre - Murdoch University, Australia 
15.Natural antifungal compounds for the control of diseases in wheat and other cereals: A. Schouten, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
16.The role of crop rotation, intercropping and tillage practices for foliar disease management of wheat and barley: T. K. Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; K. Xi, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Canada; and H. R. Kutcher, University of Saskatchewan, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786762160 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 366 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sorghum Volume 1: Genetics, breeding and production techniques Edited by Professor William Rooney 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Sorghum the crop species 
1.Classifying the genetic diversity of sorghum: a revised classification of sorghum: J. A. Dahlberg, Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center – University of California, USA; and D. T. Rosenow, formerly Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA 
2.The comparative and evolutionary genomics of sorghum: Elizabeth A. Cooper and Stephen Kresovich, Clemson University, USA 
3.Ensuring the genetic diversity of sorghum: Hari D. Upadhyaya and Mani Vetriventhan, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
 
Part 2 Sorghum improvement techniques 
4.The principles and processes of sorghum breeding: Cleve D. Franks, DuPont Pioneer, USA 
5.Advanced technologies to accelerate sorghum breeding: Joseph E. Knoll, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Harnessing genetic and genomic resources to transform the production and productivity of sorghum: Tesfaye T. Tesso, Dereje D. Gobena, Dechassa O. Duressa, Kraig Roozeboom and Krishna Jagadish, Kansas State University, USA; Ramasamy Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA; and Desalegn D. Serba and Dilooshi Weerasooriya, Kansas State University, USA 
7.Sorghum breeding for biotic stress tolerance: Ramasamy Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA; Clint W. Magill, Texas A&M University, USA; Gary C. Peterson, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA; Louis K. Prom, USDA-ARS, USA; and Elfadil M. Bashir, Tesfaye T. Tesso, Desalegn D. Serba and Christopher R. Little, Kansas State University, USA 
8.Sorghum breeding for abiotic stress tolerance: John J. Burke, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Sorghum tolerance to low phosphorus soil conditions: Willmar L. Leiser, University of Hohenheim, Germany; H. Frederick Weltzien-Rattunde and Eva Weltzien-Rattunde, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA; and Bettina I.G. Haussmann, University of Hohenheim, Germany 
10.Advanced testing, multiplication and release of new sorghum varieties: Roger L. Monk, formerly DuPont Pioneer, USA 
 
Part 3 Sorghum production techniques 
11.Crop management practices for grain sorghum: an overview: M. Djanaguiraman, P. V. V. Prasad and I. A. Ciampitti, Kansas State University, USA 
12.Improving soil and crop nutrition management in sorghum cultivation: David Mengel, Kansas State University, USA 
13.Improving water management in sorghum cultivation: Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA; Robert C. Schwartz, USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, USA; Kevin McInnes, Texas A&M University, USA; Qingwu Xue and Dana Porter, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, USA 
14.Insect pests and their management in sorghum cultivation: Bonnie B. Pendleton, West Texas A&M University, USA 
15.Sorghum diseases and their management in cultivation: seedling, seed, panicle and foliar diseases: C. R. Little and A. Y. Bandara, Kansas State University, USA and R. Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University, USA 
16.Sorghum diseases and their management in cultivation: stalk, root and other diseases: C. R. Little, A. Y. Bandara and T. C. Todd, Kansas State University, USA; and R. Perumal, Agricultural Research Center – Hays, Kansas State University USA 
17.Weed management in sorghum cultivation: M. Bagavathiannan, Texas A&M University, USA; W. Everman, North Carolina State University, USA; P. Govindasamy, Texas A&M University, USA; A. Dille and M. Jugulam, Kansas State University, USA; and J. Norsworthy, University of Arkansas, USA 
18.Post-harvest management of sorghum: B. Tran and R. Hodges, Natural Resources Institute – University of Greenwich, UK 
ISBN: 9781786761200 ¦ Pub date: July 2018 ¦ Extent: 546 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€220 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sorghum Volume 2: Sorghum utilization around the world Edited by Professor William Rooney 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Sorghum utilization 
1.Structure and chemistry of sorghum grain: S. R. Bean, B. P. Ioerger , J. D. Wilson , M. Tilley , D. Rhodes and T. J. Herald , USDA-ARS, USA 
2.The domestication, spread and uses of sorghum as a crop: F. M. Shapter, A. Crowther, G. Fox, I. D. Godwin and L. Watson-Fox, University of Queensland, Australia; I. J. C. Hannah, AGR Industries, Australia; and S. L. Norton, Agriculture Victoria, Australia 
3.Growth, development and physiology of grain sorghum: M. Djanaguiraman, P. V. V. Prasad and I. A. Ciampitti, Kansas State University, USA 
4.Sorghum as a food grain: Barbara J. Stoecker, Oklahoma State University, USA; Kebede Abegaz, Hawassa University, Ethiopia; and Yewelsew Abebe, Alive and Thrive, Ethiopia 
5.Sorghum as a forage and energy crop: Scott Staggenborg and Hui Shen, Chromatin Inc., USA 
 
Part 2 Sorghum production and improvement across the world 
6.Introducing new technologies and market strategies for sorghum producers in developing countries: the Sahel case: John H. Sanders, Purdue University, USA; Botorou Ouendeba, former Director of the 3N Program, Niger; Ababacar Ndoye, former Director of the Institute of Food Technology, Senegal; and Niaba Témé, Institute of the Agricultural Economy (IER), Mali 
7.Improving sorghum cultivation in South America: Rafael Augusto da Costa Parrella, Robert Eugene Schaffert, Cicero Bezerra de Menezes, José Avelino Santos Rodrigues, Jurandir Vieira Magalhães, Cynthia Maria Borges Damasceno, Dagma Dionísia da Silva and Simone Martins Mendes, Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, Brazil 
8.Improving production and utilization of sorghum in Asia: Aruna C., B. Dayakar Rao, Vilas A. Tonapi and T. G. Nageshwar Rao, Indian Institute of Millets Research, India 
9.Sorghum cultivation and improvement in West and Central Africa: E. Weltzien and H. F. W. Rattunde, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, formerly International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Mali; T. A. van Mourik, International Potato Center, Ghana; and H. A. Ajeigbe, International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
ISBN: 9781786761248 ¦ Pub date: April 2018 ¦ Extent: 260 pages ¦ Price £130/$170/€160 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of wheat Volume 1: Breeding, quality traits, pests and diseases Edited by Professor Peter Langridge 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Wheat physiology and breeding 
1.Wheat genetic resources: global conservation and use for the future: P. Bramel, Global Crop Diversity Trust, Germany 
2.Sequencing and assembly of the wheat genome: Kellye Eversole and Jane Rogers, International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, USA; Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Rudi Appels, Murdoch University, Australia; Catherine Feuillet, Bayer Crop Science, USA 
3.Advances in wheat breeding techniques: Alison R. Bentley and Ian Mackay, NIAB, UK 
4.Improving the uptake and assimilation of nitrogen in wheat plants: Jacques Le Gouis, INRA, France and Malcolm Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK 
5.Photosynthetic improvement of wheat plants: Martin A. J. Parry, João Paulo Pennacchi, Luis Robledo-Arratia and Elizabete Carmo-Silva, Lancaster University, UK; and Luis Robledo-Arratia, University of Cambridge, UK 
6.Improving drought and heat tolerance in wheat: Xinguo Mao, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Delong Yang, College of Life Science and Technology, Gansu Agricultural University, China; and Ruilian Jing, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
7.Advances in cold-resistant wheat varieties: D.Z. Skinner, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 2 Wheat nutritional and processing quality 
8.Genetic and other factors affecting wheat quality: A. S. Ross, Oregon State University, USA 
9.Measuring wheat quality: Ian Batey, formerly CSIRO, Australia 
10.The nutritional and nutraceutical value of wheat: Victoria Ndolo and Trust Beta, University of Manitoba, Canada 
 
Part 3 Wheat diseases, pests and weeds 
11.Wheat diseases: an overview: Albrecht Serfling, Doris Kopahnke, Antje Habekuss, Flutur ë Novakazi and Frank Ordon, Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany 
12.Advances in control of wheat rusts: Z. A. Pretorius, University of the Free State, South Africa; M. Ayliffe, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia; R. L. Bowden, ARS-USDA, USA; L. A. Boyd, National Institute of Agricultural Botany, UK; R. M. DePauw, Advancing Wheat Technologies, Canada; Y. Jin, ARS-USDA Cereal Disease Laboratory, USA; R. E. Knox, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; R. A. McIntosh and R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia; R. Prins, CenGen and University of the Free State, South Africa; E. S. Lagudah, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
13.Advances in control of wheat diseases: Fusarium head blight, wheat blast and powdery mildew: Hermann Buerstmayr, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria; Volker Mohler, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture, Germany; and Mohan Kohli, Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Paraguay 
14.Advances in disease-resistant wheat varieties: James Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA 
15.Recent molecular technologies for tackling wheat diseases: Indu Sharma, Pramod Prasad and Subhash C. Bhardwaj, ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, India 
16.Integrated wheat disease management: Stephen N. Wegulo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
17.Wheat pests: introduction, rodents and nematodes: Marion O. Harris North Dakota State University, USA; Jens Jacob, Julius Kühn-Institut; Peter Brown, CSIRO, Australia; and Guiping Yan, North Dakota State University, USA 
18.Wheat pests: insects, mites, and prospects for the future: Marion O. Harris and Kirk Anderson, North Dakota State University, USA; Mustapha El-Bouhssini, ICARDA, Morocco; Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, USA; Gary Hein, University of Nebraska, USA; and Steven Xu, USDA-ARS Northern Crops Institute, USA 
19.The impact of climate change on wheat insect pests: current knowledge and future trends: Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, USA and Sarina Macfadyen, CSIRO, Australia 
20.Integrated pest management in wheat cultivation: Abie Horrocks and Melanie Davidson, The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, New Zealand; and Paul Horne and Jessica Page, IPM Technologies Pty Limited, Australia 
21.Integrated weed management in wheat cultivation: K. Neil Harker and John O’Donovan, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada; and Breanne Tidemann, University of Alberta, Canada 
ISBN: 9781786760166 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 686 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of wheat Volume 2: Cultivation techniques Edited by Professor Peter Langridge 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Wheat cultivation techniques 
1.Variety selection in wheat cultivation: Arun Kumar Joshi, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT); Vinod Kumar Mishra, Banaras Hindu University, India; and Simanchal Sahu, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, India 
2.Establishment and root development in wheat crops: Peter J. Gregory and Christina K. Clarke, University of Reading, UK 
3.Conservation tillage for sustainable wheat intensification: the example of South Asia: Vijesh Krishna, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Germany; Alwin Keil, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), India; Sreejith Aravindakshan, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Mukesh Meena, Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, India 
4.Improving water management in winter wheat: Q. Xue, J. Rudd, J. Bell, T. Marek and S. Liu, Texas A&M Agrilife Research and Extension Center at Amarillo, USA 
5.Post-harvest wheat losses in Africa: an Ethiopian case study: Tadesse Dessalegn, Tesfaye Solomon, Tesfaye Gebre Kristos, Abiy Solomon, Shure Seboka and Yazie Chane, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Ethiopia; Bhadriraju Subramanyam and Kamala A. Roberts, Kansas State University, USA; Fetien Abay and Rizana Mahroof, South Carolina State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Wheat crop management 
6.Wheat crop modelling to improve yields: J. R. Guarin and S. Asseng, University of Florida, USA 
7.Integrated crop management of wheat: Brian L. Beres, Reem Aboukhaddour and Haley Catton, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Canada 
8.Organic production of wheat and spelt: T. F. Döring, Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany 
9.Durum wheat: production, challenges and opportunities: J. M. Clarke, K. Nilsen, D. Khitiri, X. Lin and C. J. Pozniak, University of Saskatchewan, Canada; and K. Ammar, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
 
Part 3 Improving wheat cultivation in the developing world 
10.Supporting smallholders in improving wheat cultivation: Tinashe Chiurugwi, Simon Kerr, Ian Midgley, and Lesley Boyd, National Institute of Agricultural Botany (NIAB), UK; Johnson Kamwaga, Food Crops Research Centre - Njoro, Kenya; Peter Njau, Highlands Agri-consult Services Ltd, Kenya; Terry Van Gevelt, University of Cambridge, UK; Claudia Canales and Max Marcheselli, the Malaysian Commonwealth Studies Centre (MCSC) and the Cambridge Malaysian Education and Development Trust (CMEDT), UK 
11.Improving wheat cultivation in Asia: Rajiv Kumar Sharma, Global Wheat Improvement Program - CIMMYT, India 
12.Improving wheat production in the Central and West Asia and North Africa (CWANA) region: W. Tadesse, A. Amri, M. Sanchez-Garcia, M. El-Bouhssini, M. Karrou, S. Patil, F. Bassi and M. Baum, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Morocco; and T. Oweis, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Jordan 
ISBN: 9781786760203 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 350 pages ¦ Price £130/$170/€155 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 1: From improved varieties to local applications Edited by Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Genetic diversity and breeding 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of maize and its wild relatives: J. Stephen Smith, Iowa State University, USA; Candice A. C. Gardner, USDA-ARS/Iowa State University, USA; and Denise E. Costich, CIMMYT Germplasm Bank (Maize Collection), Mexico 
2.Key challenges in maize breeding in sub-Saharan Africa: Baffour Badu-Apraku, IITA, Nigeria; M.A.B. Fakorede and R.O. Akinwale, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria 
3.Developing maize-breeding methods and cultivars to meet the challenge of climate change: Marcelo J. Carena, North Dakota State University, USA 
4.Understanding and improving protein traits in maize: Yongrui Wu, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Institute of Plant Physiology & Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and Joachim Messing, Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers University, USA 
5.Advances in mycotoxin-resistant maize varieties: Marilyn L. Warburton and W. Paul Williams, USDA-ARS Corn Host Plant Research Resistance Unit, USA 
6.Advances in cold-tolerant maize varieties: Csaba L. Marton and Zsuzsanna Tóthné Zsubori, MTA Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungary 
 
Part 2 Understanding and improving maize nutritional and sensory quality 
7.Nutritional and nutraceutical/functional properties of maize: Dharam Paul Chaudhary, Indian Institute of Maize Research (IIMR), India 
8.Biofortification of maize: Eliab Simpungwe, HarvestPlus, Zambia 
9.Assessing and improving the nutritional quality of maize: Elena Lima-Cabello and Paula Robles-Bolivar, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and The University of Western Australia, Australia 
10.Analysing maize grain quality: Glen P. Fox and Tim J. O’Hare, The University of Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 3 Translating research into practice: improving maize cultivation in the developing world 
11.Constraints in adopting improved technologies for maize cultivation: the case of Africa: T. Abdoulaye, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; A. S. Bamire and A. A. Akinola, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria; and A. Alene, A. Menkir and V. Manyong, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
12.Supporting small holders in maize cultivation: using an agricultural innovation systems approach: Mariana Wongtschowski and Remco Mur, Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), The Netherlands; and Carolina Camacho, the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
13.Women and maize cultivation: increasing productivity through gender analysis: Cheryl Doss, Oxford University, UK 
ISBN: 9781786760081 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 348 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 2: Cultivation techniques, pest and disease control Edited by Dr Dave Watson 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Maize cultivation techniques 
1.Modelling crop growth and grain yield in maize cultivation: Alam Sher, Xiaoli Liu and Jincai Li, Anhui Agricultural University, China; and Youhong Song, Anhui Agricultural University, China and The University of Queensland, Australia 
2.Optimizing maize-based cropping systems: sustainability, good agricultural practices (GAP) and yield goals: Charles Wortmann, Patricio Grassini and Roger W. Elmore, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, USA 
3.Maize seed variety selection and seed system development: the case of southern Africa: Peter S. Setimela, Global Maize Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe 
4.Good agricultural practices for maize cultivation: the case of West Africa: Alpha Kamara, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
5.Zero-tillage cultivation of maize: Wade E. Thomason, Bee Khim Chim and Mark S. Reiter, Virginia Tech University, USA 
6.Conservation agriculture for sustainable intensification of maize and other cereal systems: the case of Latin America: Bram Govaerts, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico; Isabelle François, Consultant, USA; and Nele Verhulst, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico 
7.Precision maize cultivation techniques: Louis Longchamps, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Raj Khosla, Colorado State University, USA 
8.Improving nutrient management for sustainable intensification of maize: Kaushik Majumdar, International Plant Nutrition Institute - South Asia, India; Shamie Zingore, International Plant Nutrition Institute - sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya; Fernando Garcia and Adrian Correndo, International Plant Nutrition Institute - Latin America - Southern Cone, Argentina; Jagadish Timsina, University of Melbourne, Australia; Adrian M. Johnston, International Plant Nutrition Institute, Canada 
9.Crop rotation: a sustainable system for maize production: Bao-Luo Ma, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and Zhigang Wang, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, China 
10.Intercropping in sustainable maize cultivation: Abeya Temesgen, Shu Fukai and Daniel Rodriguez, The University of Queensland, Australia 
11.Climate risk management in maize cropping systems: Daniel Rodriguez, Caspar Roxburgh, Claire Farnsworth, Ariel Ferrante, Joseph Eyre, Stuart Irvine-Brown, James McLean, Martin Bielich, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Australia 
12.Advances in maize post-harvest management: Tadele Tefera, International Center of Insect Physiology & Ecology (ICIPE), Ethiopia 
 
Part 2 Maize pests, diseases and weeds 
13.Economically important insect pests of maize: William D. Hutchison and Theresa M. Cira, University of Minnesota, USA 
14.Nematodes associated with maize: T. L. Niblack, The Ohio State University, USA 
15.Control of rodent pests in maize cultivation: the case of Africa: Loth S. Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania 
16.Rapid response to disease outbreaks in maize cultivation: the case of maize lethal necrosis: George Mahuku, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania and P. Lava Kumar, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
17.Controlling aflatoxins in maize in Africa: strategies, challenges and opportunities for improvement: Amare Ayalew and Martin Kimanya, Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, Ethiopia; Limbikani Matumba, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi; Ranajit Bandyopadhayay and Abebe Menkir, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nigeria; Peter Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA 
18.Integrated weed management in maize cultivation: an overview: Khawar Jabran, Duzce University, Turkey, Mubshar Hussain, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia 
19.Weed management of maize grown under temperate conditions: the case of Europe and the United States: Vasileios P. Vasileiadis and Maurizio Sattin, National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, Italy and Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark 
ISBN: 9781786760128 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 470 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Rice insect pests and their management By Professor E. A. Heinrichs 

 
Table of contents  
 
1. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: root and stem feeders 
2. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: stem borers and rice gall midges 
3. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: leafhoppers and planthoppers 
4. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: foliage feeders 
5. Biology and ecology of rice-feeding insects: panicle feeders 
6. Integrated pest management (IPM) of rice 
ISBN: 9781786761965 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 292 pages ¦ Price £200/$260/€240 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of rice Volume 1: Breeding for higher yield and quality Edited by Professor Takuji Sasaki 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Rice breeding 
1.Ensuring and exploiting genetic diversity in rice: Jennifer Spindel and Susan McCouch, Cornell University, USA 
2.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for rice: R. B. Angeles-Shim and M. Ashikari, Nagoya University, Japan 
3.Breeding strategies to improve rice yields: an overview: K. K. Jena and G. Ramkumar, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines 
4.Improving photosynthesis in rice: from small steps to giant leaps: R. F. Sage, University of Toronto, Canada; and Shunsuke Adachi and Tadashi Hirasawa, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan 
5.Breeding green super rice (GSR) varieties for sustainable rice cultivation: Z. Li, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; and J. Ali, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines 
6.Mechanisms of drought tolerance in rice: Anuj Kumar, Supratim Basu, Venkategowda Ramegowda and Andy Pereira, University of Arkansas, USA 
 
Part 2 Rice nutritional and processing quality 
7.Advances in understanding the role of rice in nutrition: Melissa Fitzgerald, University of Queensland, Australia; Adoracion Resurreccion, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines; and Julie Pua Ferraz, Diabetes Foundation Marikina and Calamba Doctors' Hospital, The Philippines 
8.The nutraceutical properties of rice: Lu Yu, University of Maryland, USA; and Margaret Slavin and Mengyi Dong, George Mason University, USA 
9. Biofortified Golden Rice: an additional intervention for vitamin A deficiency: Adrian Dubock, Golden Rice Humanitarian Board, Switzerland 
10.Development of rice varieties with improved iron content in grain: Navreet K. Bhullar, ETH Zurich, Switzerland 
11.Quality parameters and testing methods in rice cultivation: Rachelle Ward, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Australia 
12.Agronomic and environmental factors affecting rice grain quality: Chuan Tong and Jinsong Bao, Zhejiang University, China 
ISBN: 9781786760241 ¦ Pub date: May 2017 ¦ Extent: 298 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of rice Volume 2: Cultivation, pest and disease management Edited by Professor Takuji Sasaki 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Rice cultivation techniques 
1.Advances in irrigation techniques for rice cultivation: D. S. Gaydon, CSIRO Agriculture, Australia 
2.Advances in nutrient management in rice cultivation: Bijay-Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India and V.K. Singh, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
3.Sustainable rice cultivation in coastal saline soils: a case study: Sukanta K. Sarangi and Buddheswar Maji, ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, India 
4.Dry-seeded and aerobic rice cultivation: T. Parthasarathi, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel; M. Kokila, D. Selvakumar, V. Meenakshi and A. Kowsalya, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India; K. Vanitha, Tamil Nadu Rice Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India; A. Tariq, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; A. Surendran, Rutgers University, USA; and Eli Vered, Netafim Irrigation Ltd, Israel 
5.Processing rice straw and husks as co-products: Nguyen Van Hung, Carlito Balingbing, James Quilty, Bjoern Ole Sander, Matty Demont and Martin Gummert, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines 
 
Part 2 Overall management of rice cultivation 
6.Yield gap analysis towards meeting future rice demand: Kazuki Saito et al., Africa Rice Center, Benin 
7.Developments in the system of rice intensification (SRI): Norman Uphoff, Cornell University, USA 
8.Assessing the sustainability impacts of rice cultivation: Wyn Ellis, Sustainable Rice Platform, Thailand 
 
Part 3 Rice pests 
9.Rice insect pests: biology and ecology: E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA; F. Nwilene, The Africa Rice Center, Nigeria; M. Stout, Louisiana State University, USA; B. Hadi, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines; and T. Freitas, Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 
10.Management of rice insect pests: E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA; F. Nwilene, The Africa Rice Center, Nigeria; M. Stout, Louisiana State University, USA; B. Hadi, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines; and T. Freitas, Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil 
11.Plant protection products in rice cultivation: critical issues in risk assessment and management to promote sustainable use: Maura Calliera and Ettore Capri, Università Cattolica Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, Italy 
12.Integrated pest management for sustainable rice cultivation: a holistic approach: F. G. Horgan, University of Technology Sydney, Australia 
13.Control of rodent pests in rice cultivation: P. R. Brown et al., CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia 
14.Integrated weed management techniques for rice: Simerjeet Kaur and Gulshan Mahajan, Punjab Agricultural University, India; and Bhagirath S. Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786760289 ¦ Pub date: May 2017 ¦ Extent: 438 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Horticulture 

Achieving sustainable turfgrass management Edited by Professor Michael Fidanza 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Physiology, breeding and cultivation 
1.Advances in understanding turfgrass physiology: David Jespersen, University of Georgia, USA 
2.Advances in breeding for improved cultivars of turfgrass: Phillip Vines, Rutgers University, USA 
3.Advances in soil management for successful establishment and maintenance of turfgrass: Doug Soldat, University of Wisconsin, USA 
4.Advances in phosphite utilization for turfgrass: John Dempsey, Independent Turfgrass Research, Ireland 
5.Advances in irrigation and water management of turfgrass: Marco Schiavon, University of Florida, USA 
6.Advances in maintenance practices of turfgrass: Adam Thoms, Iowa State University, USA 
7.Advances in turfgrass for athletic fields and sports pitches: Gerald Henry, University of Georgia, USA 
8.Advances in turfgrass for ornamental lawns: Rebecca Grubbs-Bowling, Texas A&M University, USA 
 
Part 2 Biotic and abiotic stresses 
9.Advances in turfgrass disease management: Jim Kerns, North Carolina State University, USA 
10.Advances in turfgrass insect pest management: Ben McGraw, Pennsylvania State University, USA 
11.Advances in turfgrass weed management: Matt Elmore, Rutgers University, USA 
12.Advances in plant growth regulation in turfgrass: David Gardner, Ohio State University, USA 
13.Advances in abiotic stress management in turfgrass: Charles Fontanier, Oklahoma State University, USA 
14.Advances in managing organic matter in turfgrass ecosystems: Alec Kowalewski, Charles Schmid, Ruying Wang and Emily Braithwaite, Oregon State University, USA 
15.Advances in biostimulants in turfgrass: Michael Fidanza, Pennsylvania State University, USA 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
16.Considerations with using unmanned aircraft systems in turfgrass: Dale Bremer, Kansas State University, USA 
17.Considerations with selecting turfgrass varieties and cultivars: Kevin Morris, USDA-National Turfgrass Evaluation Program, USA 
18.Considerations with turfgrasses and pollinators: Michelle Wisdom, University of Arkansas, USA 
19.Considerations with measuring and monitoring rootzone water status in turfgrass: Carmen Magro, Stevens Water, USA 
20.Considerations with water for turfgrass in arid environments: Brian Whitlark, United States Golf Association, USA 
21.Considerations with soil testing in turfgrass: Cole Thompson, United States Golf Association, USA 
ISBN: 9781801460194 ¦ Pub date: January 2023 ¦ Extent: 600 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of bananas - Volume 3 Edited by Professor André Drenth and Professor Gert H. J. Kema 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fungal diseases 
1.Major banana leaf diseases: yellow and black Sigatoka, eumusa leaf spot: Jean Carlier, CIRAD, France 
2.Fungal diseases of banana: freckle: André Drenth, The University of Queensland, Australia 
3.Fungal diseases of banana: Fusarium wilt R1: Einar Martinez, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
4.Fungal diseases of banana: Fusarium wilt TR4: Gert Kema, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
5.Towards sustainable management of Fusarium wilt in banana: André Drenth, The University of Queensland, Australia 
6.Minor fungal diseases of banana: Speckle, Rust (Uredo musae), Black Cross (Pyllachora musicola), Marasmiellus rot, Cigar end (Verticillium Theobroma), Anthracnose: Luis Ernesto Pocasangre, EARTH University, Costa Rica 
 
Part 2 Bacterial and Phytoplasma diseases 
7.Bacterial diseases of banana: Moko: Mauricio Guzmán, Corbana, Costa Rica 
8.Bacterial diseases of banana: banana blood disease: Jane Ray, The University of Queensland, Australia 
9.Bacterial diseases of banana: Xanthomonas wilt: Guy Blomme, Bioversity, Italy 
10.Bacterial soft rots of pseudostem and rhizome in banana and plantain: Luis Pérez-Vicente, INISAV, Cuba 
11.Phytoplasma diseases in banana: banana wilt associated phytoplasma (BWAP) and emerging phytoplasmas: Lilia Carvalhais, The University of Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 3 Viral diseases 
12.Viral diseases of banana: banana bunchy top virus: John Thomas, The University of Queensland, Australia 
13.Viral diseases of banana: banana streak virus: Andrew Geering, The University of Queensland, Australia 
14.Emerging banana viruses: banana mild mosaic virus, bract mosaic virus, banana mosaic virus, novel banana viruses: Sebastien Massart, University of Liege, Belgium 
 
Part 4 Nematode pests of banana 
15.Nematodes of banana: Mieke Daneel, Agricultural Research Council (ARC), South Africa 
16.Towards sustainable management of nematodes in banana: Tony Pattison, DAF - Queensland, Australia 
 
Part 5 Insect pests of banana 
17.Insect pests of banana: weevil borer: Cesar Guillen Sanchez, Corbana, Costa Rica 
18.Insect pests of banana: thrips: Frans Wielemaker, Consultant, Costa Rica 
19.Insect pests of banana: common bunch pests and their sustainable management: Luud Clercx, Project Manager – AgroFair Benelux BV, The Netherlands 
 
Part 6 Disease affecting the fruit 
20.Management of diseases on banana fruit in the field: Marco Jackson, Fyffes Costa Rica, Costa Rica 
21.Post-harvest diseases in banana and their sustainable management: Maria Gloria Lobo, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
ISBN: 9781786769817 ¦ Pub date: April 2023 ¦ Extent: 480 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables Edited by Professor Victor R. Preedy and Dr Vinood B. Patel 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: polyphenols 
1.Advances in understanding the nutraceutical properties of antioxidants in fruits and vegetables: Ugunujhie Agbaje, Mallaidh Hyndman and Soraeya Kharaty, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin - City Campus, Ireland; and Swarna Jaiswal and Amit K. Jaiswal, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin - City Campus and Environmental Sustainability and Health Institute, Technological University Dublin - City Campus, Ireland 
2.Advances in understanding phenolic compounds in fruits and vegetables: Cristine Vanz Borges, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil; Fabio Vianello, University of Padua (UNIPD), Italy; Ricardo Alfredo Kluge, University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil; and Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil 
3.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of flavonoids in fruits and vegetables: chemical structure and groups: A. D. Diwan, S. N. Harke and A. N. Panche, MGM Institute of Biosciences & Technology, Mahatma Gandhi Mission University, India 
4.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of flavonoids in fruits and vegetables: mechanisms of action: A. D. Diwan, S. N. Harke and A. N. Panche, MGM Institute of Biosciences & Technology, Mahatma Gandhi Mission University, India 
 
Part 2 Phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables: glucosinolates and organosulfur compounds 
5.Health-promoting effects of glucosinolates and their breakdown products: Ella O'Grady, Greta Pileckaite, Almha Gilheany and Endrita Kucana, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin - City Campus, Ireland; and Swarna Jaiswal and Amit K. Jaiswal, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin - City Campus and Environmental Sustainability and Health Institute, Technological University Dublin - City Campus, Ireland 
6.Nutraceutical potential of glucosinolates: Ella O'Grady and Greta Pileckaite, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin – City Campus, Ireland; Aline Alberti, Graduate Program in Food Science and Technology, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil; and Swarna Jaiswal and Amit K. Jaiswal, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin – City Campus and Environmental Sustainability and Health Institute, Technological University Dublin – City Campus, Ireland 
7.Understanding the health benefits and nutraceutical properties of organosulphur compounds in vegetables: Greta Pileckaite and Ella O’Grady, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin – City Campus, Ireland; and Swarna Jaiswal and Amit K. Jaiswal, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin – City Campus and Environmental Sustainability and Health Institute, Technological University Dublin – City Campus, Ireland 
 
Part 3 Phytochemicals and the prevention of disease 
8.Advances in understanding the role of plant phytochemicals in preventing cancer: Gulsun Akdemir Evrendilek, Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey 
9.Advances in understanding the role of plant phytochemicals in preventing cardiovascular disease: Nicholas J. Sadgrove and Monique S. J. Simmonds, Royal Botanic Gardens – Kew, UK 
 
Part 4 Analysing and optimising phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables 
10.Advances in screening/analysis of phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: Alessandro Nogueira, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil; Amit K. Jaiswal, School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Technological University Dublin - City Campus and Environmental Sustainability and Health Institute, Technological University Dublin - City Campus, Ireland; and Aline Alberti, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil 
11.Agronomic factors affecting phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: Jiangtao Hu, Li Zhang, Zheng Wang, Jie Peng, Xiao Yang and Qichang Yang, Institute of Urban Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Chengdu National Agricultural Science and Technology Center, China 
12.Understanding processing of phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables in the gut: Stan Kubow, Lucas Roldos, Kailee Wark and Michèle M. Iskandar, McGill University, Canada 
 
Part 5 Case studies 
13.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of cranberries: Oliver Chen, Biofortis Research, Merieux NutriSciences and Tufts University, USA; and Eunice Mah, Biofortis Research, Merieux NutriSciences, USA 
14.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of apples: Lia Noemi Gerschenson, Eliana Noemi Fissore and Carolina Bélen Gómez Vargas, Universidad de Buenos Aires and CONICET, Argentina 
15.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of broccoli and other Brassicas: Elsa M. Gonçalves, Unidade de Tecnologia e Inovação, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária and GeoBioTec – Geobiociências, Geoengenharias e Geotecnologias, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal; Carla Alegria, SFCOLAB – Associação Smart Farm COLAB Laboratório Colaborativo para a Inovação Digital na Agricultura, Rua Cândido dos Reis nº1, Espaço SFCOLAB and cE3c – Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal; Ana Cristina Ramos, Unidade de Tecnologia e Inovação, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária and GeoBioTec – Geobiociências, Geoengenharias e Geotecnologias, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal; and Marta Abreu, Unidade de Tecnologia e Inovação, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária and LEAF, Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food, School of Agriculture, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal 
ISBN: 9781786768506 ¦ Pub date: August 2022 ¦ Extent: 478 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Improving integrated pest management in horticulture Edited by Professor Rosemary Collier 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Using biological agents in integrated pest management 
1.Advances in biopesticides for insect control in horticulture: Travis R. Glare, Bio-Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University, New Zealand; and Aimee C. McKinnon, La Trobe University, Australia 
2.Advances in bioprotectants for plant disease control in horticulture: Philippe C. Nicot, Thomas Pressecq and Marc Bardin, INRAE, Pathologie Végétale, France 
3.Advances in biostimulants as an IPM tool in horticulture: Surendra K. Dara, University of California Cooperative Extension, USA 
4.Improving application systems for bioprotectants in integrated pest management (IPM) programmes in horticulture: Clare Butler Ellis, Silsoe Spray Applications Unit Ltd, UK 
 
Part 2 Using decision support systems in integrated pest management 
5.Advances in insect pest and disease monitoring and forecasting in horticulture: Irene Vänninen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Finland; 
6.Advances in proximal sensors to detect crop health status in horticultural crops: Catello Pane, CREA – Research Centre for Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Italy; 
7.Advances in decision support systems (DSSs) for integrated pest management in horticultural crops: Mark W. Ramsden, ADAS, UK; and Aoife O’Driscoll, NIAB, UK; 
 
Part 3 Improving integrated pest management techniques and implementation 
8.The use of agronomic practices in integrated pest management programmes in horticulture: Aude Alaphilippe, Claude Bussi, Marion Casagrande, Tarek Dardouri and Sylvaine Simon, INRAE UERI Gotheron, France; Pierre-Eric Lauri, INRAE UMR ABSys, France; Amélie Lefèvre, INRAE Agroecological Vegetable Systems Experimental Facility, France; and Mireille Navarrete, INRAE UR Ecodeveloppement, France 
9.Advancing conservation biological control as a component of integrated pest management of horticultural crops: Robbie D. Girling, Tom D. Breeze and Michael P. Garratt, University of Reading, UK 
10.Assessing the economics of integrated pest management for horticultural crops: Philip R. Crain and David W. Onstad, Corteva Agriscience, USA 
11.Encouraging integrated pest management uptake in horticultural crop production: Norma R. Samuel, Associate District Extension Director and Urban Horticulture Extension Agent, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, USA; and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida-Gainesville, USA 
 
Part 4 Case studies 
12.Practical application of integrated pest management in greenhouses and protected cultivation: Bruno Gobin, Els Pauwels and Joachim Audenaert, PCS-Ornamental Plant Research, Belgium 
13.Practical applications of integrated pest management in horticultural cultivation: the cases of protected tomato and outdoor Brassica production: Richard H. Binks, FreshTec Agricultural Consultancy Limited, UK 
14.Practical application of integrated pest management to control cabbage root fly in vegetables: Louis Lippens, PCG vzw – Vegetable Research Centre Kruishoutem, Belgium; Sander Fleerakkers, PSKW vzw – Research Station for Vegetable Production Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium; Femke Temmerman, Inagro vzw, Belgium; and Annelies De Roissart, HOGENT University of Applied Sciences & Arts, Belgium 
ISBN: 9781786767530 ¦ Pub date: March 2022 ¦ Extent: 486 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in horticultural soilless culture Edited by Professor Nazim Gruda 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Soilless culture systems and growing media in horticulture: a overview: Nazim Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
 
Part 1 Materials 
2.Advances in understanding plant root behaviour and rootzone management in soilless culture systems: Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph, Canada 
3.Developments in inorganic materials, synthetic organic materials and peat in soilless culture systems: Jeb S. Fields, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, USA; and Nazim S. Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
4.Developments in alternative organic materials for growing media in soilless culture systems: Nazim S. Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany; and Neil Bragg, Substrate Associates Ltd, United Kingdom 
5.Understanding and optimizing the physical properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Jean Caron, Université Laval, Canada; and Jean-Charles Michel, L’Institut Agro, France 
6.Understanding and optimising the chemical properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Patrizia Zaccheo and Laura Crippa, University of Milan, Italy; and Francesco Giuffrida, University of Catania, Italy 
7.Understanding and optimising the biological properties of growing media for soilless cultivation: Francesco Giuffrida and Rosario Paolo Mauro, University of Catania, Italy; and Patrizia Zaccheo, University of Milan, Italy 
 
Part 2 Technologies 
8.Advances in liquid- and solid-medium soilless culture systems: Yüksel Tüzel, Ege University, Turkey; and Astrit Balliu, Agricultural University of Tirana, Albania 
9.Advances in irrigation/fertigation techniques in greenhouse soilless culture systems (SCS): Georgios Nikolaou and Damianos Neocleous, Ministry of Agriculture, Rural Development and Environment, Cyprus; and Evangelini Kitta and Nikolaos Katsoulas, University of Thessaly, Greece 
10.Advances in nutrient management modelling and nutrient concentration prediction for soilless culture systems: Jung Eek Son, Tae In Ahn and Taewon Moon, Seoul National University, Korea 
11.Advanced hydroponics design for plant cultivation in cities: Giuseppina Pennisi, Alessandro Pistillo, Elisa Appolloni, Francesco Orsini and Giorgio Gianquinto, DISTAL – University of Bologna, Italy 
12.Optimizing product quality in soilless culture systems (SCS): Pietro Santamaria, Barbara De Lucia and Angelo Signore, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy 
 
Part 3 Case studies 
13.Advances in soilless cultivation of tomatoes and other fruit vegetables: V. Truffault, Futura Gaïa, France; and E. Legast, Centre Technique Interprofessionnel des Fruits et Légumes (CTIFL), France 
14.Advances in soilless culture strawberry production: Mike Nichols, formerly Massey University, New Zealand 
15.Advances in soilless culture of ornamentals: Erik van Os and Arca Kromwijk, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
ISBN: 9781786764355 ¦ Pub date: February 2021 ¦ Extent: 442 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of bananas Volume 1: Cultivation techniques Edited by Professor Gert H. J. Kema and Professor André Drenth 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Banana production and its challenges 
1.The origin, domestication and dispersal of bananas: Hugo Volkaert, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Thailand 
2.Understanding the banana industry: monoculture and beyond: Dan Koeppel, Independent Journalist and Researcher, USA 
3.Banana cultivation in Africa: W. K. Tushemereirwe and J. Kubiriba, National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Uganda 
4.Challenges and opportunities for smallholders in banana value chains: William Tinzaara, Bioversity International, Uganda; Dietmar Stoian, Bioversity International, France, Walter Ocimati, Enoch Kikulwe and Gloria Otieno, Bioversity International, Uganda; and Guy Blomme, Bioversity International, Ethiopia 
 
Part 2 Improving practices across the banana value chain 
5.A functional approach to bunch formation in banana: D. W. Turner, School of Agriculture and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Australia; and D. J. Gibbs, Consultant, Australia 
6.Banana plant propagation methods: Sharon D. Hamill, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
7.Conserving banana germplasm through field genebanks: Mike Smith, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
8.Good agricultural practices: an end or a starting point for more sustainable banana production?: Charles Staver, Bioversity International, France 
9.Challenges in cultivation of bananas in the subtropics: Víctor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
10.Nutrition and soil management in banana cultivation: Jetse J. Stoorvogel, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Rafael A. Segura, CORBANA S.A., Costa Rica 
11.Harvesting and packaging of bananas: Juan José Aycart, Dole, Ecuador 
12.Ripening systems for bananas: Frits Popma, Popma Fruit Expertise, The Netherlands 
 
Part 3 Assessing and improving sustainability 
13.Life cycle assessment and carbon footprint of banana cultivation: Louis Bockel, Laure-Sophie Schiettecatte and Orane Debrune, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Italy 
14.Sustainable banana cultivation: from standards to multiple solutions: Sietze Vellema and Kees Jansen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
15.Organic banana cultivation and sustainability: Frans Wielemaker, Consultant (formerly Director of Research at Dole Fresh Fruit International), Costa Rica 
ISBN: 9781786761569 ¦ Pub date: October 2018 ¦ Extent: 378 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of bananas Volume 2: Germplasm and genetic improvement Edited by Professor Gert H. J. Kema and Professor André Drenth 

 
Table of contents 
 
1.An overview of genetic improvement in bananas over the last century: Mike Smith, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; and Michael Pillay, Vaal University of Technology, South Africa 
 
Part 1 Classification 
2.Cytogenetics of structural rearrangements in Musa hybrids and cultivars: Fajarudin Ahmad, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Indonesia and Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; Peter M. Bourke and Henk Schouten, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; Hugo Volkaert, Center for Agricultural Biotechnology – Kasetsart University, Thailand; Gert H. J. Kema, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands; and Hans de Jong, Kasetsart University, Thailand and Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
3.Identifying and classifying banana cultivars: Jeff Daniells, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; and Steven B. Janssens, Botanic Garden Meise, Belgium 
4.Exploiting current Musa collections: V. Guignon, Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT, France 
 
Part 2 Broadening the genetic base 
5.Scope of collecting wild Musa species germplasm: Julie Sardos, Alliance of Bioversity International and CIAT, Montpellier Office, France 
6.Collection and evaluation of wild Musa species: Hugo A. Volkaert, Center for Agricultural Biotechnology – Kasetsart University, Thailand 
7.Collection and evaluation of banana and plantain landraces in Africa: D. Karamura and W. Ocimati, Bioversity International, Uganda; G. Blomme, Bioversity International, Ethiopia; J. G. Adheka, University of Kisangani (UNIKIS), Democratic Republic of the Congo; C. Sivirihauma, Université Catholique du Graben (UCG), Democratic Republic of the Congo; D. B. Dhed’a, University of Kisangani (UNIKIS), Democratic Republic of the Congo; and E. Karamura, Bioversity International, Uganda 
8.Seed germination, preservation and population genetics of wild Musa germplasm: Bart Panis, Bioversity International and Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium; Simon Kallow, Royal Botanical Gardens Kew, UK and Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium; and Steven B. Janssens, Meise Botanic Garden, Belgium 
9.Safe dissemination of germplasm resources of banana: John Thomas, The University of Queensland, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Ecosciences Precinct, Australia; Sébastien Massart, Integrated and Urban Plant Pathology Laboratory, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liège, Belgium; Ines Van den Houwe, Bioversity International Transit Centre, KU Leuven, Division of Crop Biotechnics – Laboratory of Tropical Crop Improvement, Belgium; Nicolas Roux, Bioversity International, France; and Kathy Crew, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Ecosciences Precinct, Australia 
 
Part 3 Genetic improvement through breeding 
10.Making banana breeding more effective: F. Bakry, J. P. Horry and C. Jenny, CIRAD, UMR AGAP and AGAP, Université de Montpellier, CIRAD, INRAE, Institut Agro, France 
11.Overcoming the fertility crisis in bananas (Musa spp.): Delphine Amah, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; David W. Turner, The University of Western Australia, Australia; D. Jane Gibbs, Consultant, Australia; Allan Waniale, Makerere University and National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Uganda; Gil Gram, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Uganda and Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium; and Rony Swennen, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania and Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium 
12.Targeted improvement of Cavendish clones: Eli Khayat, Rahan Meristem (1998) LTD., Israel 
13.Developing hybrid banana varieties with improved properties: Edson Perito Amorim, Vanusia Batista de Oliveira Amorim, Manassés dos Santos Silva, Fernando Haddad, Claudia Fortes Ferreira and Janay Almeida dos Santos Serejo, Embrapa, Brazil 
14.Genetic modification of bananas: the long road to farmers’ fields: James Dale, Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Wilberforce Tushemereirwe, National Agricultural Research Organisation, Uganda; and Robert Harding, Queensland University of Technology, Australia 
15.The usage of phenotyping, genetics and functional genomics approaches to improve environmental stress factors in banana: Sebastien Christian Carpentier, Bioversity International and Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium; and David Eyland, Katholieke University of Leuven (KUL), Belgium 
ISBN: 9781786763440 ¦ Pub date: November 2020 ¦ Extent: 426 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of ornamental plants Edited by Emeritus Proessor Michael Reid 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Physiology and breeding 
1.Environmental physiology of ornamental plants: John Erwin, University of Maryland, USA 
2.Exploiting the genetic diversity of ornamentals: Yoo Gyeong Park, Gyeongsang National University, Republic of Korea; Young Hoon Park, Pusan National University, Republic of Korea; Abinaya Manivannan, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Republic of Korea; Prabhakaran Soundararajan, National Institute of Agricultural Science, Republic of Korea; and Byoung Ryong Jeong, Gyeongsang National University, Republic of Korea 
3.Advances in conventional breeding techniques for ornamentals: Traud Winkelmann and Philipp Braun, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany; and Emmy Dhooghe and Johan van Huylenbroeck, Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Belgium 
4.Advances in tissue culture techniques for ornamental plant propagation: G. R. Rout, Odisha University of Agriculture and Technology, India; and S. Mohan Jain, University of Helsinki, Finland; 
5.Advances in molecular breeding of ornamentals: Neil O. Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA 
6.The use of gene-editing techniques in breeding improved ornamentals: Bruno Trevenzoli Favero, Josefine Nymark Hegelund and Henrik Lütken, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 
7.Advances in abiotic stress-resistant varieties of ornamentals: Qiansheng Li and Mengmeng Gu, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, USA 
8.Improving nutrient management in the cultivation of ornamental plants in greenhouse, container and field production: John Majsztrik, Clemson University, USA and James S. Owen Jr., USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
9.Advances in irrigation practices and technology in ornamental cultivation: John D. Lea-Cox, University of Maryland, USA 
10.Advances in protected cultivation of ornamentals: James E. Faust, Clemson University, USA 
11.Diseases affecting ornamental geophytes and their control: Gary A. Chastagner and Andrea R. Garfinkel, Washington State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786763280 ¦ Pub date: April 2020 ¦ Extent: 444 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Advances in postharvest management of horticultural produce Edited by Professor Chris Watkins 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Preservation techniques 
1.Advances in cooling technologies to preserve horticultural produce: J. R. Olatunji and A. R. East, Massey University, New Zealand 
2.Advances in controlled atmosphere storage of horticultural produce: John DeLong, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada; and Robert Prange, Dalhousie University, Canada 
3.Advances in modified atmosphere and active packaging of horticultural produce: Jeffrey S. Brandenburg, The JSB Group LLC, USA 
4.Advances in the use of barrier coatings and additives in the preservation of fresh horticultural produce: lizabeth A. Baldwin, formerly USDA-ARS, USA; and Jeffrey K. Brecht,University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Safety management and disinfection techniques 
5.Post-harvest risk management of biological hazards encountered in horticultural produce: Keith Warriner and Mahdiyeh Hasani, University of Guelph, Canada 
6.Advances in understanding pathogens contaminating horticultural produce: P. Truchado, A. Allende and M. I. Gil, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain 
7.Advances in postharvest sanitizing regimes for horticultural produce: Joshua B. Gurtler, Xuetong Fan, Tony Jin and Brendan A. Niemira, USDA-ARS, USA 
8.Advances in using heat for disinfection/disinfestation of horticultural produce:Elazar Fallik and Susan Lurie, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center (ARO), Israel; and Lisa Jamieson and Allan Woolf, The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, New Zealand 
9.Advances in the use of irradiation for the market access of fresh horticultural produce: John Golding and Sukhvinder Pal Singh, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia 
10.Advances in the potential use of non-thermal plasma in postharvest treatment of fresh horticultural produce: Sukhvinder Pal Singh and John Golding, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia 
11.Advances in the use of ozone in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Marcin Glowacz, Natural Resources Institute (NRI) – University of Greenwich, UK 
12.Advances in the use of biological control agents in the disinfection of horticultural produce: Samir Droby, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center (ARO), Israel; Michael Wisniewski, USDA-ARS, USA; and Davide Spadaro, University of Torino, Italy 
 
Part 3 Monitoring and management 
13.Monitoring postharvest attributes: instrumental techniques for measuring harvest maturity/fruit quality: Kerry B. Walsh and Nicholas T. Anderson, Central Queensland University, Australia 
14.Postharvest handling of organically produced specialty crops: Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Chris Gunter and Marlee Trandel, North Carolina State University, USA 
15.Smart distribution to maintain shelf life of horticultural produce: J. K. Brecht, University of Florida, USA; I. Uysal and M. C. N. Nunes, University of South Florida, USA; J. P. Emond, The Illuminate Group, USA; S. Mercier, Décathlon Canada, Canada; and U. McCarthy, Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland 
ISBN: 9781786762887 ¦ Pub date: January 2020 ¦ Extent: 464 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tropical fruits Edited by Professor Elhadi M. Yahia  

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Citrus fruits 
1.Mapping and exploiting the citrus genome: Patrick Ollitrault, CIRAD, France 
2.Harvesting citrus: challenges and perspectives in an automated world: Marcos David Ferreira, Embrapa Instrumentação, Brazil 
3.Advances in postharvest handling of citrus fruit: John Golding and John Archer, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries and University of Newcastle, Australia 
4.Advances in understanding the ecology of citrus insect pests: Robert W. Jones, Universidad Autonóma de Queretaro, Mexico; Pablo Leido, Departamento de Entomología Tropical, Mexico; and Santiago Vergara-Pineda, Universidad Autonóma de Queretaro, Mexico 
5.Advances in integrated pest management (IPM) in citrus cultivation: Lukasz Stelinski, University of Florida, USA 
6.Lime breeding: a way forward: Muhammad Usman, University of Agriculture, Pakistan; Muhammad Mumtaz Khan and Rashid Al-Yahyai, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman; and Bilquees Fatima, University of Agriculture, Pakistan 
7.Advances in mandarin breeding: José Cuenca, Luis Navarro and Pablo Aleza, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrias (IVIA), Spain 
 
Part 2 Other tropical fruits 
8.Advances in avocado propagation for the sustainable supply of planting materials: Jayeni Hiti-Bandaralage, Alice Hayward, Chris O'Brien, Madeline Gleeson, William Nak and Neena Mitter, The University of Queensland, Australia 
9.Advances in cultivation of avocado: Gary S. Bender, University of California Cooperative Extension, USA 
10.Ecological intensification of banana production systems: Charles Staver, Bioversity International, France 
11.Advances in breeding of coconut: L. Parera, Coconut Research Institute, Sri Lanka; R. Manimekalai, Sugarcane Breeding Institute, India; and S. Sudarsono, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia 
12.Advances in cultivation of coconut: M. A. Foale, Quang Thien Nguyen and Steve W. Adkins, The University of Queensland, Australia 
13.Advances in guava breeding: Pankaj Kumar and K. Usha, Division of Fruits and Horticultural Technology – Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India; and Bhupinder Singh, Centre for Environment Science and Climate Resilient Agriculture (CESCRA), India 
14.Advances in cultivation of guava: Noosheen Zahid and Mehdi Maqbool, University of Poonch, Pakistan; and Ajit Singh and Asgar Ali, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Malaysia 
15.Crop improvement in jackfruit: S. Shyamalamma and S. Priyanka, University of Agricultural Sciences, India; and G. S. K. Swamy and P. M. Sampath, University of Horticultural Sciences, India 
16.Achieving sustainable cultivation of litchi: Xuming Huang, South China Agricultural University, China 
17.Advances in breeding of mangoes: Sunday O. S. Akinyemi, National Horticultural Research Institute, Nigeria 
18.Advances in mango cultivation: Victor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
19.Advances in breeding of papaya: Sunil Kumar Sharma, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
20.Advances in the cultivation of papaya: Parmeshwar Lal Saran, ICAR - Directorate of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Research, India; and Ravish Choudhary, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India 
21.Advances in breeding and cultivation of pomegranate: Ibrahim Kahramanoglu, Serhat Usanmaz and Turgut Alas, European University of Lefke, Cyprus 
ISBN: 9781786762849 ¦ Pub date: December 2019 ¦ Extent: 644 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Integrated management of diseases and insect pests of tree fruit Edited by Professor Xiangming Xu and Dr. Michelle Fountain 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Fruit diseases 
1.Epidemiology and management of apple scab: Tom Passey and Xiangming Xu, NIAB EMR, UK 
2.Powdery mildew: biology, epidemiology, and management of Podosphaera spp. of tree fruit: A. Amiri and L. Gañán, Washington State University, USA 
3.Apple replant disease: causes and management: Zhiquan Mao and Yanfang Wang, Shandong Agricultural University, China 
4.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple cankers in Europe: Robert Saville and Leone Olivieri, NIAB EMR, UK 
5.Fungal diseases of fruit: apple canker in Asia: Baohua Li, Qingdao Agricultural University, China 
6.Brown rot: causes, detection and control of Monilinia spp. affecting tree fruit: Imre Holb, University of Debrecen and Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary 
7.Apple mosaic virus: biology, epidemiology and detection: Karel Petrzik, Biology Centre CAS, Czech Republic 
8.Plum pox virus: detection and management: Manuel Rubio, Federico Dicenta and Pedro Martínez-Gómez, CEBAS-CSIC, Spain 
 
Part 2 Integrated fruit disease management 
9.Disease monitoring and decision making in integrated fruit disease management: Angela Berrie, NIAB EMR, UK 
10.Breeding fruit cultivars with durable disease resistance: Vincent G. M. Bus and Joanna K. Bowen, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, New Zealand; Andrea Patocchi, Agroscope, Switzerland; Giovanni A. L. Broggini, ETH Zürich, Switzerland; Satish Kumar, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, New Zealand; and François N. D. Laurens, Institut National de Recherche Agronomique, France 
11.Improving plant propagation methods for fruit disease control: Ioannis Tzanetakis, University of Arkansas, USA; and Robert Martin, USDA-ARS, USA 
12.Improving fungicide use in integrated fruit disease management: Mengjun Hu, University of Maryland, USA 
13.Use of biocontrol agents in fruit tree disease management: Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherland
14.New techniques for managing post-harvest diseases of fruit: physical, chemical and biological agents: Simona Marianna Sanzani and Antonio Ippolito, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Italy 
 
Part 3 Insect pests of fruit 
15.Insect pests of fruits: aphids: Giuseppe E. Massimino Cocuzza, Università di Catania, Italy 
16.Integrated management of tortricid pests of tree fruit: Alan L. Knight, USDA-ARS, USA; Gary J. R. Judd, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, Canada; Todd Gilligan, USDA-APHIS-PPQ, USA; Eduardo Fuentes-Contreras, Universidad de Talca, Chile; and William B. Walker III, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden 
17.Integrated management of mite pests of tree fruit: Rebecca A. Schmidt-Jeffris, Clemson University, USA; Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, USA; and Carlo Duso, University of Padua, Italy 
18.Integrated management of tree fruit insect pests: Drosophila suzukii (Spotted Wing Drosophila): Neil Audsley, Fera Science Ltd, UK; and Lorenzo Tonina and Nicola Mori, University of Padova, Italy 
 
Part 4 Integrated management of fruit insect pests 
19.Cultural control of arthropod pests in temperate tree fruit: Matthew J. Grieshop, Michigan State University, USA 
20.Improving monitoring and forecasting in integrated management of fruit arthropod pests: Tim Belien, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt VZW, Belgium; Slawomir Lux, inSilico-IPM, Poland; Bart De Ketelaere, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; and Dany Bylemans, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt VZW, Belgium 
21.Biological control in integrated management of deciduous fruit insect pests: the use of semiochemicals: Larry Gut, Christopher Adams and James Miller, Michigan State University, USA; and Peter McGhee and Donald Thomson, Pacific Biocontrol Corporation, USA 
22.Optimizing insecticide use in integrated management of fruit insect pests: Claudio Ioriatti and Gino Angeli, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Italy; Greg Krawczyk, The Pennsylvania State University, USA; and Carlo Duso, University of Padova, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786762566 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 748 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of vegetables Edited by Emeritus Professor George Hochmuth 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding vegetable physiology: root systems as the next frontier in improving sustainable vegetable production: Felipe H. Barrios-Masias, University of Nevada, USA 
2.Advances in understanding and mitigating vegetable responses to abiotic stress: Frederik Börnke, Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ) and University of Potsdam, Germany 
3.Developments in breeding vegetables: Laura A. Chatham, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation 
4.Advances in irrigation techniques in vegetable cultivation: Andre da Silva, University of Georgia, USA 
5.Advances in understanding soil health for vegetable cultivation: Ajay Nair, Iowa State University, USA 
6.Advances in greenhouses and other protected structures used for cultivation of vegetables: Martine Dorais, Centre de recherche en innovation sur les végétaux, Université Laval, Canada 
7.Developments in soilless/hydroponic cultivation of vegetables: Dimitrios Savvas, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece 
8.Advances in organic cultivation of vegetables: Xin Zhao, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 3 Pests and pathogens 
9.Understanding and monitoring diseases of vegetables: Mohammad Babadoost, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, USA 
10.Advances in understanding insect pests of vegetables: a case study of sweetpotato weevil: Ken Sorensen, North Carolina State University, USA 
11.Integrated pest management (IPM) of vegetables: examples of successful deployment: Joshua Freeman, University of Florida, USA 
12.Microbiological safety of vegetable produce: the impact of pre- and post-harvest practices: Max Teplitski, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USA 
 
Part 4 Case studies 
13.Advances in carrot breeding: Emmanuel Geoffriau, Agrocampus Ouest, IRHS, France 
14.Sustainable carrot product: Mary Ruth McDonald, University of Guelph, Canada 
15.Advances in lettuce breeding: Germán Sandoya, University of Florida, USA 
16.Advances in lettuce cultivation: Rosemary Collier, University of Warwick, UK 
17.Advances in breeding of cucumbers and watermelon: Todd Wehner, North Carolina State University, USA 
18.Alternative tillage production systems for cucurbit vegetables: Alan Walters, Southern Illinois University, USA 
19.Sustainable production of cabbage on plasticulture: Charles E. Barrett, University of Florida, USA 
20.Advances in pea breeding: Diego Rubiales, Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, Spain 
ISBN: 9781786762368 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 644 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Achieving sustainable greenhouse cultivation Edited by Professor Leo Marcelis and Dr Ep Heuvelink 

 
Table of contents  
 
1.Achieving sustainable greenhouse production: present status, recent advances and future developments: Leo F. M. Marcelis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; Joaquim Miguel Costa, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal; and Ep Heuvelink, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
Part 1 Production systems 
2.Advances in greenhouse design: Juan I. Montero, formerly Institut de Recerca i Tecnología Agroalimentaries, Spain; and Yi Zhang, Qichang Yang and Xinglin Ke, Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture, China 
3.Advances in screenhouse design and practice for protected cultivation: Josef Tanny, Agricultural Research Organization – Volcani Center, Israel 
4.Aquaponic systems for crop cultivation: B. W. Alsanius and S. Khalil, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden; A. Tadesse, Debre Berhan University, Ethiopia; A. K. Rosberg, K. J. Bergstrand, R. Hartmann, L. Mogren, M. Alam, M. Grudén and T. Naznin, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden; and A. Getahun, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia 
5.Advances in organic greenhouse cultivation: Martine Dorais, Université Laval, Canada 
6.Towards sustainable plant factories with artificial lighting (PFALs): from greenhouses to vertical farms: Toyoki Kozai, Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan; Yumiko Amagai, Chiba University, Japan; and Eri Hayashi, Japan Plant Factory Association, Japan 
 
Part 2 Crop management 
7.Understanding crop responses to controlled climates in greenhouses: Chieri Kubota, The Ohio State University, USA 
8.Developments in growing substrates for greenhouse cultivation: Youbin Zheng, University of Guelph, Canada 
9.Advances in irrigation management in greenhouse cultivation: Stefania De Pascale, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; Luca Incrocci, University of Pisa, Italy; Daniele Massa, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Italy; Youssef Rouphael, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; and Alberto Pardossi, University of Pisa, Italy 
10.Advances in nutrient management in greenhouse cultivation: Neil S. Mattson, Cornell University, USA; and Christopher J. Currey, Iowa State University, USA 
11.Advances in pest and disease management in greenhouse cultivation: Gerben J. Messelink and H. Marjolein Kruidhof, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
 
Part 3 System management 
12.Automation and robotics in greenhouses: E. J. van Henten, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
13.Models, sensors and decision support systems in greenhouse cultivation: Oliver Körner, Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ), Germany 
14.Assessing the impact of environmental factors on the quality of greenhouse produce: Nazim Gruda, University of Bonn, Germany 
15.Sustainable use of energy in greenhouses: S. Hemming, J. C. Bakker, J. B. Campen and F. L. K. Kempkes, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
16.Assessing the environmental impact of greenhouse cultivation: Assumpció Antón, Erica Montemayor and Nancy Peña, Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA), Spain 
ISBN: 9781786762801 ¦ Pub date: September 2019 ¦ Extent: 538 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tree nuts Edited by Professor Ümit Serdar and Emeritus Professor Dennis Fulbright 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Improving health, safety and sustainability 
1.The nutritional and nutraceutical value of walnut: Turan Karadeniz, Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey; Faik Ekmel Tekintaş, Adnan Menderes University, Turkey; and Seyit Mehmet Şen, Kastamonu University, Turkey 
2.Advances in understanding the nutritional profile and health benefits of almonds: Özlem Tokuşoğlu, Celal Bayar University, Turkey 
3.Advances in understanding health benefits of hazelnuts: Loretta Bacchetta, Silvia Procacci and Barbara Benassi, ENEA-Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Italy 
4.Uses and health benefits of chestnuts: Eduardo Augusto dos Santos Rosa, Maria Cristina Seixas Martins Morais, Ivo Vaz Oliveira, Berta Maria de Carvalho Gonçalves Macedo and Ana Paula Calvão Moreira da Silva, Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Portugal 
5.Advances in understanding health benefits of pistachio: Pablo Hernández-Alonso, Mònica Bulló and Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain 
6.Advances in detecting tree nut allergens: Stef J. Koppelman and Melanie L. Downs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA 
7.Integrated disease management in tree nut cultivation: Andrea Vannini and Carmen Morales-Rodríguez, Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF) – University of Tuscia, Italy 
8.Tree nut cultivation, ecosystem services, biodiversity and conservation: Gabriele Beccaro, Marta De Biaggi, Chiara Ferracini and Simona Bonelli, University of Turin, Italy 
 
Part 2 Improving individual types of tree nuts 
9.Towards sustainable production of walnut (Juglans regia L.): Annarita Marrano and David Neale, University of California-Davis, USA 
10.Advances in cultivation of walnuts: D. L. McNeil, University of Tasmania, Australia 
11.Advances in cultivation of almonds: effects of genotypes, environment and cultural techniques: Ettore Barone and Francesco Sottile, Università di Palermo, Italy 
12.Advances in breeding of chestnuts: Teresa Barreneche, BFP, INRA, Université de Bordeaux, France; Roberto Botta, Università di Torino, Italy; and Cécile Robin, BIOGECO, INRA, Université de Bordeaux, France 
13.Advances in cultivation of chestnuts: Ümit Serdar, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Turkey; Toshihiro Saito, Institute of Fruit Tree and Tea Science, Japan; Beatriz Cuenca, Empresa de Transformacion Agraria S.A (TRAGSA) Maceda, Spain; Burak Akyüz, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Turkey; José Gomes Laranjo, University of Tras-Os-Montes (UTAD) CITAB, Portugal; Gabriele Beccaro and Giancarlo Bounous, University of Turin, Italy; Rita Lourenço Costa and Patrícia Fernandes, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária, Portugal; Maria Gabriella Mellano, University of Turin, Italy; and Pereira Lorenzo Santiago, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Spain 
14.Advances in breeding of pistachio: Salih Kafkas, University of Çukurova, Turkey 
15.Advances in cultivation of pistachio: Bekir Erol Ak, University of Harran, Turkey 
16.Developing hazelnuts as a sustainable and industrial crop: Valerio Cristofori, Stefano Speranza and Cristian Silvestri, University of Tuscia, Italy 
17.Advances in breeding of hazelnuts: Ali Islam, Ordu University, Turkey 
ISBN: 9781786762245 ¦ Pub date: July 2019 ¦ Extent: 552 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of temperate zone tree fruits and berries Volume 1 Edited by Professor Gregory A. Lang 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Physiology and genetics 
1.Advances in understanding fruit tree root–rhizosphere relationships for enhanced plant health: Mark Mazzola and Shashika S. Hewavitharana, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Advances in the development and utilization of rootstocks: a case study for apple: Gennaro Fazio, USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Resources Unit, USA; and Terence Robinson, Cornell University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding fruit tree growth: Ted DeJong, University of California-Davis, USA 
4.Advances in understanding reproductive development in fruit-bearing plants: Tomoya Esumi, Shimane University, Japan; and Ryutaro Tao, Kyoto University, Japan 
5.Advances in fruit genetics: Ksenija Gasic and Christopher Saski, Clemson University, USA 
 
Part 2 Optimizing sustainable cultivation and quality 
6.Optimizing production of quality nursery plants for fruit tree cultivation: Stefano Musacchi, Washington State University and Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, USA; and Davide Neri, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italy 
7.Optimizing precision in orchard irrigation and nutrient management: Denise Neilsen and Gerry Neilsen, Summerland Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
8.Optimizing plant growth, yield and fruit quality with plant bioregulators: Duane Greene, University of Massachusetts, USA 
9.Optimizing fruit production efficiencies through mechanization: Manoj Karkee, Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems, Washington State University, USA; Jacqueline Gordón, Washington State Tree Fruit Association, USA; Bernardita Sallto, Washington State University, USA; and Matthew Whiting, Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems, Washington State University, USA 
10.Optimizing pest management in fruit cultivation: Arthur Agnello, Cornell University, USA 
11.Optimizing disease management in fruit cultivation: Sara M. Villani, North Carolina State University, USA; Kerik D. Cox, Cornell University, USA; and George W. Sundin, Michigan State University, USA 
12.Pre- and post-harvest strategies to optimize fruit quality and shelf-life: Peter M. A. Toivonen, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada 
13.Bioactive/nutraceutical compounds in fruit that optimize human health benefits: Federica Blando and Miriana Durante, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA), Italy; and B. Dave Oomah, formerly Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Canad
ISBN: 9781786762085 ¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 520 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of temperate zone tree fruits and berries Volume 2 Edited by Professor Gregory A. Lang 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Stone and pome fruits 
1.Advances and challenges in peach breeding: Dario J. Chavez and Rachel A. Itle, University of Georgia, USA; Daniel Mancero-Castillo, Universidad Agraria del Ecuador, Ecuador; Jose X. Chaparro, University of Florida, USA; and Thomas G. Beckman, USDA-ARS, USA 
2.Advances and challenges in sustainable peach production: Luca Corelli Grappadelli, Brunella Morandi and Luigi Manfrini, University of Bologna, Italy; and Pasquale Losciale, University of Bari, Italy 
3.Advances and challenges in cherry breeding: José Quero-García, INRA, University of Bordeaux, France; Amy Iezzoni, Michigan State University, USA; Gregario López-Ortega, IMIDA, Spain; Cameron Peace, Washington State University, USA; Mathieu Fouché and Elisabeth Dirlewanger, INRA, University of Bordeaux, France; and Mirko Schuster, Julius Kühn-Institut, Germany 
4.Sustainable sweet cherry cultivation: a case study for designing optimized orchard production systems: Gregory A. Lang, Michigan State University, USA 
5.Challenges and opportunities in pear breeding: Danielle Guzman and Amit Dhingra, Washington State University, USA 
6.Challenges and opportunities in pear cultivation: Todd Einhorn, Michigan State University, USA 
7.Advances and challenges in apple breeding: Amanda Karlström, NIAB EMR and University of Reading, UK; Magdalena Cobo Medina, NIAB EMR and University of Nottingham, UK; and Richard Harrison, NIAB EMR, UK 
8.Advances and challenges in sustainable apple cultivation: Pierre-Éric Lauri and Sylvaine Simon, INRA, France 
9.Sustainable plum and apricot cultivation: Mihai Botu, University of Craiova, Romania 
 
Part 2 Berry fruits 
10.Advances and challenges in strawberry genetic improvement: Chris Barbey and Kevin Folta, University of Florida, USA 
11.Strawberries: a case study of how evolving market expectations impact sustainability: M. P. Pritts, Cornell University, USA; and T. M. Sjulin, formerly Driscoll Strawberry Associates, USA 
12.Advances and challenges in raspberry and blackberry breeding: Ramón Molina-Bravo, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Costa Rica; Margaret Leigh Worthington, University of Arkansas, USA; and Gina E. Fernandez, North Carolina State University, USA 
13.Advances and challenges in sustainable raspberry/blackberry cultivation: Julie Graham, Alison Karley, Alison Dolan, Dominic Williams and Nikki Jennings, James Hutton Institute, UK 
14.Advances and challenges in blueberry breeding: Susan McCallum, James Hutton Institute, UK 
ISBN: 9781786762122 ¦ Pub date: June 2019 ¦ Extent: 470 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of mangoes Edited by Dr Victor Galán Saúco and Dr Ping Lu 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Genetic improvement and plant physiology 
1.Exploiting the mango genome: molecular markers: V. Pérez and J. I. Hormaza , Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea La Mayora (IHSM La Mayora – CSIC – UMA), Spain 
2.The genetic diversity of mangoes: Noris Ledesma, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, USA 
3.Advances in understanding mango tree growth and canopy development: Frédéric Normand, CIRAD, France; and Pierre-Éric Lauri, INRA, France 
4.Advances in understanding flowering, pollination and fruit development in mangoes: Maria Hilda Pérez-Barraza and Jorge Alberto Osuna-Garcia, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agrícolas y Pecuarias, Mexico 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
5.Mango cultivation practices in the tropics: good agricultural practices to maximise sustainable yields: Sisir Mitra, International Society for Horticultural Science, India and A. Bhagwan, Fruit Research Station, India 
6.Mango cultivation practices for the subtropics: Victor Galán Saúco, Instituto Canario de Investigaciones Agrarias, Spain 
7.Mango cultivation in greenhouses: John Y. Yonemoto, Japan Tropical Fruit Association, Japan 
8.Management of an ultra-high-density mango orchard and benefits of the small-tree system: Steven A. Oosthuyse, HortResearch SA, South Africa 
9.Organic mango production: a review: Víctor Manuel Medina-Urrutia, Jaime Eduardo Reyes-Hernández, Gil Virgen-Calleros and Enrique Pimienta-Barrios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico; and Marciano Manuel Robles-González, Campo Experimental Tecomán, Mexico 
10.Improving fertilizer and water-use efficiency in mango cultivation: A. G. Levin, Supplant Ltd, Israel 
 
Part 3 Post-harvest management 
11.Monitoring fruit quality and quantity in mangoes: Kerry Walsh and Zhenglin Wang, Central Queensland University, Australia 
12.Understanding post-harvest deterioration of mangoes: Apiradee Uthairatanakij and Pongphen Jitareerat, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand; Robert E. Paull, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA 
13.Post-harvest storage management of mango fruit: Noam Alkan, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, Israel; and Anirudh Kumar, Agricultural Research Organization (ARO), Volcani Center, Israel and Indira Gandhi National Tribal University (IGNTU), India 
14.The nutritional and nutraceutical/functional properties of mangoes: Laurent Urban, University of Avignon, France; Mônica Maria de Almeida Lopes and Maria Raquel Alcântara de Miranda, Federal University of Ceará, Brazil 
15.Life cycle assessment of mango systems: Claudine Basset-Mens, Sandra Payen, Henri Vannière, Angela Braun and Yannick Biard, CIRAD, France 
 
Part 4 Diseases and pests 
16.Integrated disease management in mango cultivation: Randy C. Ploetz, University of Florida, USA 
17.Integrated pest management and biological pest control strategies in mango cultivation: Stefano De Faveri, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia 
ISBN: 9781786761323 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 570 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of apples Edited by Dr K. Evans 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of apples: Gayle M. Volk, USDA-ARS-CARR National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, USA 
2.The apple genome - harbinger of innovation for sustainable apple production: Amit Dhingra, Washington State University, USA 
3.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: rootstocks and planting systems: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia 
4.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: the manipulation of tree growth and development: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia 
5.Advances in understanding flowering and pollination in apple trees: Peter M. Hirst, Purdue University, USA 
6.Advances in understanding apple fruit development: A.N. Lakso and M. C. Goffinet, Cornell University, USA 
7.Evaluating and improving rootstocks for apple cultivation: G. Fazio, USDA-ARS/Cornell University, USA 
8.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of apples: K. Evans and C. Peace, Washington State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
9.Innovations in apple tree cultivation to manage crop load and ripening: Stefano Musacchi, Washington State University, USA; and Duane Greene, University of Massachusetts, USA 
10.Advances in soil and nutrient management in apple cultivation: G. H. Neilsen, D. Neilsen and T. Forge, Summerland Research and Development Centre Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; and K. Hannam, Natural Resources Canada 
11.Mechanization and automation for apple production: Q. Zhang, M. Karkee and L. R. Khot, Washington State University, USA 
12.Sustainable approaches to control postharvest diseases of apples: W. J. Janisiewicz and W. M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA 
13.Advances in postharvest handling and storage of apples: Christopher B. Watkins, Cornell University, USA 
 
Part 3 Diseases and pests 
14.Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases: Wayne M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA and Kerik D. Cox, Cornell University, USA 
15.Management of viruses and virus-like agents affecting apple production: Kenneth C. Eastwell, Washington State University, USA 
16.Bacterial diseases affecting apples: John Norelli, USDA-ARS, USA 
17.Sustainable arthropod management for apples: Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, USA 
18.Advances in pest- and disease-resistant apple varieties: Markus Kellerhals, Agroscope, Switzerland 
 
Part 4 Sustainability 
19.The economics of apple production: R. Karina Gallardo, Washington State University, USA; and Hildegard Garming, Thünen Institute of Farm Economics, Germany 
20.Consumer trends in apple sales: Desmond O’Rourke, Washington State University and Belrose Inc., USA 
21.Assessing the environmental impact and sustainability of apple cultivation: D. Granatstein, Washington State University, USA; and G. Peck, Cornell University, USA 
22.Growing organic apples in Europe: Jutta Kienzle, Independent Researcher, Germany; and Markus Kelderer, Research Station of Laimburg, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786760326 ¦ Pub date: June 2017 ¦ Extent: 616 pages ¦ Price £220/$285/€265 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of tomatoes Edited by Dr A. K. Mattoo and Professor A. K. Handa 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation techniques 
1.Modelling crop growth and yield in tomato cultivation: Kenneth J. Boote, University of Florida, USA 
2.Optimizing yields in tomato cultivation: maximizing tomato plant use of resources: V. S. Almeida, F. T. Delazari, C. Nick, W. L. Araújo and D. J. H. Silva, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil 
3.Improving water and nutrient management in tomato cultivation: E. Simonne, M. Ozores-Hampton, A. Simonne and A. Gazula, University of Florida, USA 
4.Organic greenhouse tomato production: Martine Dorais, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Laval University, Quebec, Canada 
 
Part 2 Plant physiology and breeding 
5.Understanding and improving water-use efficiency and drought resistance in tomato: A. Zsögön, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil; and M. H. Vicente, D. S. Reartes and L. E. P. Peres, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil 
6.Ensuring the genetic diversity of tomatoes: Andreas W. Ebert and Lawrence Kenyon, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan 
7.Tomato plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress: C. A. Avila, S. C. Irigoyen and K. K. Mandadi, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, USA 
8.Developments in tomato breeding: conventional and biotechnology tools: Y. Bai, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands 
9.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of tomatoes: Junming Li, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers – Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China 
10.Genetic engineering of tomato to improve nutritional quality, resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses, and for non-food applications: B. Kaur and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA; and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA 
11.Developing tomato varieties with improved flavour: M. Causse, E. Albert and C. Sauvage, INRA, France 
12.Understanding and improving the shelf life of tomatoes: K. Wang and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA; and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA 
 
Part 3 Diseases, pests and weeds 
13.Insect-transmitted viral diseases infecting tomato crops: H. Czosnek, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; A. Koren, Hishtil Nursery, Israel; and F. Vidavski, Tomatech R&D, Israel 
14.Genetic resistance to viruses in tomato: Moshe Lapidot and Ilan Levin, Institute of Plant Sciences – Volcani Center, ARO, Israel 
15.Bio-ecology of major insect and mite pests of tomato crops in the tropics: R. Srinivasan, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan 
16.Integrated pest management in tomato cultivation: Robert L. Gilbertson, Marcela Vasquez-Mayorga and Mônica Macedo, University of California-Davis, USA; and R. Muniappan, Virginia Tech, USA 
17.Developing disease-resistant tomato varieties: D. R. Panthee, J. P. Kressin and P. Adhikari, North Carolina State University, USA 
18.Integrated weed management in tomato cultivation: Francesco Tei and Euro Pannacci, University of Perugia, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786760401 ¦ Pub date: March 2017 ¦ Extent: 564 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Roots, tubers and pulses 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes Volume 1: Breeding improved varieties Edited by Dr Gefu Wang-Pruski 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding potato plant physiology and growth: Curtis M. Frederick, University of Wisconsin, USA; Masahiko Mori, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan; and Paul C. Bethke, USDA-ARS and University of Wisconsin, USA 
2.Understanding ageing processes in seed potatoes: Paul C. Struik, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands 
3.Ensuring the genetic diversity of potatoes: John Bamberg and Shelley Jansky, USDA-ARS, USA; Alfonso del Rio, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA; and Dave Ellis, International Potato Center (CIP), Peru 
4.Advances in conventional potato-breeding techniques: Jai Gopal, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India 
5.Hybrid potato breeding for improved varieties: Pim Lindhout, Michiel de Vries, Menno ter Maat, Su Ying, Marcela Viquez-Zamora and Sjaak van Heusden, Solynta, The Netherlands 
 
Part 2 Improving particular traits 
6.Advances in development of potato varieties resistant to abiotic stress: Ankush Prashar and Filipe de Jesus Colwell, Newcastle University, UK; and Csaba Hornyik and Glenn J. Bryan, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
7.Developing early-maturing, stress-resistant potato varieties: Prashant G. Kawar, ICAR-Directorate of Floricultural Research, India; Hemant B. Kardile, Raja S., Som Dutt, Raj Kumar Goyal, Vinay Bhardwaj, B. P. Singh, P. M. Govindakrishnan and S. K. Chakrabarti, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India; and P. Manivel, ICAR-Directorate of Medicinal & Aromatic Plants Research, India 
8.Developing new sweet potato varieties with improved performance: Peng Zhang, Weijuan Fan, Hongxia Wang, Yinliang Wu and Wenzhi Zhou, Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and Jun Yang, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, China 
9.Nutritional properties and enhancement/bio-fortification of potatoes: Duroy A. Navarre, Washington State University and USDA-ARS, USA; and M. Moehninsi, Sen Lin and Hanjo Hellmann, Washington State University, USA 
10.Improving the breeding, cultivation and use of sweetpotato in Africa: Putri Ernawati Abidin and Edward Ewing Carey, International Potato Center (CIP), Ghana 
 
Part 3 Translating research into practice: improving cultivation in the developing world 
11.Potato production and breeding in China: Liping Jin, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
12.Improving potato cultivation to promote food self-sufficiency in Africa: Moses Nyongesa and Nancy Ng’ang’a, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Kenya 
13.Supporting smallholder women farmers in potato cultivation: Linley Chiwona-Karltun, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Maryanne Wamahiu, Stockholm University, Sweden; Chikondi Chabvuta, Actionaid International, Malawi; Dianah Ngonyama, Association of African Agricultural Professionals in the Diaspora, USA; and Paul Demo, International Potato Center (CIP), Malawi 
ISBN: 9781786761002 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 320 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes Volume 2: Production, storage and crop protection Edited by Dr Stuart Wale 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Potato production and storage 
1.Modelling potato growth: Ilkka Leinonen, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), UK; and Hongyan Chen and James A. Taylor, Newcastle University, UK 
2.Improving potato cultivation practices: an overview: Vijay Kumar Dua, Sanjay Rawal, Sukhwinder Singh and Jagdev Sharma, ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, India 
3.Improving nutrient management in potato cultivation: Philip J. White, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
4.Advances in irrigation management and technology in potato cultivation: experiences from a humid climate: Jerry Knox and Tim Hess, Cranfield University, UK 
5.Organic potato cultivation: Thomas F. Döring, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and University of Bonn, Germany; and Derek H. Lynch, Dalhousie University, Canada 
6.Post-harvest storage of potatoes: Adrian Briddon, Adrian Cunnington and Glyn Harper, Sutton Bridge Crop Storage Research, UK 
7.Acrylamide formation in fried potato products and its mitigation: Bruno De Meulenaer, Raquel Medeiros Vinci and Frédéric Mestdagh, Ghent University, Belgium 
 
Part 2 Diseases and pests 
8.Fungal diseases affecting potato storage: A. Lees, The James Hutton Institute, UK 
9.Bacterial diseases affecting potatoes: M. Jennifer Sjölund, Rachel Kelly, Gerry S. Saddler and David M. Kenyon, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
10.Viruses affecting potatoes: Colin Jeffries and Christophe Lacomme, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
11.Non-infectious disorders affecting potatoes: Andrew P. Robinson, North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota, USA 
12.Nematode pests of potatoes: Kim Davie and Jon Pickup, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), UK 
13.Potato pest management with specific reference to the Pacific Northwest (USA): Stuart Reitz, Oregon State University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761286 ¦ Pub date: September 2018 ¦ Extent: 328 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes Volume 1: Advances in breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Dr Shoba Sivasankar, Dr David Bergvinson, Dr Pooran Gaur, Dr Shiv Kumar Agrawal, Dr Steve Beebe, and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding grain legume physiology: stomatal behavior and response to abiotic stress: E. Troyo Diéguez and A. Nieto-Garibay, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, México; J.L. García-Hernández, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango, México; P. Preciado-Rangel, Instituto Tecnológico de Torreón, México; F. A. Beltrán-Morales and F. H. Ruiz-Espinoza, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, México; and B. Murillo-Amador, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste, México 
2.Advances in understanding grain legume physiology: understanding root architecture, nutrient uptake and response to abiotic stress: Yinglong Chen, The University of Western Australia, Australia and Northwest A&F University, China; Ivica Djalovic, Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops, Serbia; and Kadambot Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
3.Conserving and characterizing the genetic diversity of grain legumes: P. J. Bramel and H. D. Upadhyaya, Global Crop Diversity, Germany and International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
4.Advanced breeding techniques for grain legumes in the genomics era: Juan M. Osorno and Phillip E. McClean, North Dakota State University, USA; and Timothy Close, University of California (Riverside), USA 
5.Genetic modification of grain legumes: Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur and Kiran Kumar Sharma, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
6.Developing drought- and heat-tolerant varieties of grain legumes: Shoba Sivasankar, Former Director, CGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes, India 
7.Developing pest- and disease-resistant cultivars of grain legumes: Diego Rubiales, Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, Spain 
8.Biofortification of grain legumes: Bodo Raatz, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
 
Part 2 Cultivation 
9.Variety selection and seed quality management in grain legume cultivation: Jean Claude Rubyogo, Pan-Africa Bean Research Alliance (PABRA), International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Tanzania; and Wilfred Odhiambo, Seed Systems Consultant, Kenya 
10.Grain legumes in integrated crop management systems: Chris Johansen and Kadambot H.M. Siddique, The University of Western Australia, Australia 
11.Grain legume–cereal intercropping systems: L. Bedoussac, ENSFEA, INRA AGIR, France; E-P. Journet, CNRS LIPM, INRA AGIR, France; H. Hauggaard-Nielsen, Roskilde University, Denmark; C. Naudin and G. Corre Hellou, Ecole Supérieure d’Agricultures, France; E. S. Jensen, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; and E. Justes, INRA AGIR, France 
12.Soil and nutrient management in grain legume cultivation: S. Adjei-Nsiah , International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Ghana ; and B.D.K. Ahiabor, CSIR-Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Ghana 
13.Diseases affecting grain legumes and their management: Keith Thomas, University of Sunderland, UK 
14.Insect pests and integrated pest management techniques in grain legume cultivation: Tolulope A. Agunbiade, Yale University, USA; Weilin Sun, Michigan State University, USA; Brad S. Coates, USDA-ARS, USA; Fouss é ni Traore, Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, Burkina Faso; James A. Ojo, Kwara State University, Nigeria; Anne N. Lutomia, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; Julia Bello-Bravo, Michigan State University, USA; Saber Miresmailli, Ecoation Innovative Solutions Inc., Canada; Joseph E. Huesing, USAID, USA; Michael Agyekum, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, USA; Manuele Tamò, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Benin; and Barry R. Pittendrigh, Michigan State University, USA 
15.Weed management in grain legume cultivation: Don W. Morishita, University of Idaho, USA 
16.Grain legume storage in developing nations: L. L. Murdock and D. Baributsa, Purdue University, USA 
17.Drying, handling, storing and quality monitoring of pulses: C.B. Singh, University of South Australia, Australia; and D.S. Jayas, University of Manitoba, Canada 
18.Dietary health benefits, phytochemicals and anti-nutritional factors in grain legumes: Elizabeth Ryan, Colorado State University, USA; Indi Trehan, Kristie Smith and Mark Manary, Washington University, USA 
19.The nutritional potential of grain legumes: an economic perspective: Alan de Brauw, International Food Policy Research Institute, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761361 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 432 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of grain legumes Volume 2: Improving cultivation of particular grain legumes Edited by Dr Shoba Sivasankar, Dr David Bergvinson, Dr Pooran Gaur, Dr Shiv Kumar Agrawal, Dr Steve Beebe, and Dr Manuele Tamò 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation of common beans, lentils, soybeans and groundnuts 
1.Developing improved varieties of common bean: James D. Kelly, Michigan State University, USA 
2.Improving cultivation practices for common beans: John O. Ojiem, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Kenya 
3.Developing improved varieties of lentil: William Erskine, University of Western Australia, Australia; Ashutosh Sarker, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), India; and Shiv Kumar, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
4.Improving cultivation of lentils: : Fred J. Muehlbauer, Washington State University, USA; and Ashutosh Sarker, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), India 
5.The use of marker-assisted selection in developing improved varieties of soybean: Y.-C. Lee, R. Lemes Hamawaki, V. Colantonio, M. J. Iqbal and D. A. Lightfoot, Southern Illinois University, USA 
6.Improving cultivation practices for soybeans in sub-Saharan Africa: Frederick P. Baijukya and Harun M. Murithi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; and Fred Kanampiu, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Kenya 
7.Developing improved varieties of groundnut: C. Michael Deom, University of Georgia, USA; David Kalule Okello, National Semi-Arid Resources Research Institute, Uganda 
8.Improving cultivation of groundnuts: S. N. Nigam, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India; D. L. Jordan, North Carolina State University, USA; and P. Janila, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
9.Preventing mycotoxin contamination in groundnut cultivation: David Jordan, Rick Brandenburg and Gary Payne, North Carolina State University, USA; David Hoisington, Nick Magnan and James Rhoads, The University of Georgia, USA; Mumuni Abudulai, Savanna Agricultural Research Institute, Ghana; Koushik Adhikari and Jinru Chen, The University of Georgia, USA; Richard Akromah, William Appaw and William Ellis, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana; Maria Balota and Kumar Mallikarjunan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA; Kenneth Boote and Greg MacDonald, University of Florida, USA; Kira Bowen, Auburn University, USA; Boris Bravo-Ureta and Jeremy Jelliffe, University of Connecticut, USA; Agnes Budu, University of Ghana, Ghana; Hendrix Chalwe, Alice Mweetwa and Munsanda Ngulube, University of Zambia, Zambia; Awere Dankyi and Brandford Mochia, Crops Research Institute, Ghana; Vivian Hoffmann, International Food Policy Research Institute, USA; Amade Muitia, Mozambique Institute of Agricultural Research, Mozambique; Agnes Mwangwela, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi; Sam Njoroge, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Malawi; David Okello, National Semi-Arid Resources Research Institute (NaSARRI), Uganda; and Nelson Opoku, University for Development Studies, Ghana 
 
Part 2 Cultivation of cowpea, faba beans and pigeonpea 
10.Breeding improved varieties of cowpea: B. B. Singh, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India 
11.Improving cultivation of cowpea in West Africa: Alpha Y. Kamara, Lucky O. Omoigui and Nkeki Kamai, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; Sylvester U. Ewansiha, University of Benin, Nigeria; and Hakeem A. Ajeigbe, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Nigeria 
12.Developing improved varieties of faba bean: Fouad Maalouf, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Lebanon; and Seid Ahmed and Somanagouda Patil, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco 
13.Efficient and sustainable production of faba bean: R. Redden, RJR Agricultural Consultants, Australia; X. Zong, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China; R. M. Norton, International Plant Nutrition Institute and University of Melbourne, Australia; F. L. Stoddard, University of Helsinki, Finland; F. Maalouf, International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), Lebanon; S. Ahmed and M. El Bouhssini, International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), Morocco; Y. Tao and L. Rong, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China; and Li Ling, Liaoning Academy of Agricultural Science, China 
14.Developing improved varieties of pigeonpea: K. B. Saxena, United Arab Emirates; Y. S. Chauhan, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Australia; C. V. S. Kumar, A. J. Hingane, R. V. Kumar, R. K. Saxena and G. V. R. Rao, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), India 
15.Improving the cultivation of pigeonpea: K. R. Latha and L. Vimalendran, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India 
ISBN: 9781786761408 ¦ Pub date: January 2018 ¦ Extent: 398 pages ¦ Price £170/$220/€205 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cassava Volume 1: Cultivation techniques Edited by Dr Clair H. Hershey 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 The cassava plant and its uses 
1.The emergence of cassava as a global crop: Doyle McKey, University of Montpellier, France and Marc Delêtre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland 
2.Use and nutritional value of cassava roots and leaves as a traditional food: Aurélie Bechoff, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, UK 
3.Cassava for industrial uses: Kuakoon Piyachomkwan and Sittichoke Wanlapatit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Thailand; and Klanarong Sriroth, Kasetsart University, Thailand 
4.New uses and processes for cassava: Keith Tomlins and Ben Bennett, Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, UK 
 
Part 2 Current cassava cultivation and opportunities for improvement 
5.Cassava cultivation in Asia: Tin Maung Aye, CIAT, Vietnam 
6.Cassava cultivation in sub-Saharan Africa: Dunstan S. C. Spencer, Enterprise Development Services Ltd, Sierra Leone; and Chuma Ezedinma, UNIDO, Nigeria 
7.Cassava cultivation in Latin America: Olivier F. Vilpoux, Denilson de Oliveira Guilherme and Marney Pascoli Cereda, Catholic University of Campo Grande, Brazil 
8.Drivers of change for cassava’s multiple roles in sustainable development: Clair H. Hershey, formerly CIAT, Colombia 
9.Targeting smallholder farmers to adopt improved cassava technologies: challenges and opportunities: Kolawole Adebayo, Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria 
10.GCP21: a global cassava partnership for the 21st century: Claude M. Fauquet and Joe Tohme, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
 
Part 3 Sustainable intensification of cassava cultivation 
11.Integrated crop management for cassava cultivation in Asia: Tin Maung Aye, CIAT, Vietnam; and Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
12.Seed systems management in cassava cultivation: James George and Sarojini Amma Sunitha, ICAR-Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, India 
13.Cassava cultivation and soil productivity: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
14.Addressing nutritional disorders in cassava cultivation: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
15.Nutrient sources and their application in cassava cultivation: Reinhardt Howeler, CIAT Emeritus - formerly CIAT, Thailand 
16.Intercropping and crop rotations in cassava cultivation: a production systems approach: Thomas W. Kuyper, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ghana 
17.Value chain approaches to mechanization in cassava cultivation and harvesting in Africa: George Marechera and Grace Muinga, African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF), Kenya 
ISBN: 9781786760005 ¦ Pub date: July 2017 ¦ Extent: 424 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cassava Volume 2: Genetics, breeding, pests and diseases Edited by Dr Clair H. Hershey 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cassava genetic resources and breeding tools 
1.Advances in understanding cassava growth and development: Virgílio Gavicho Uarrota, Deivid L. V. Stefen, Clovis Arruda de Souza (UTM) and Cileide Maria Medeiros Coelho, University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), Brazil; Rodolfo Moresco and Marcelo Maraschin, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil; Fernando David Sánchez-Mora, Technical University of Manabí, Ecuador; and Eduardo da Costa Nunes, Enilto de Oliveira Neubert and Luiz Augusto Martins Peruch, Santa Catarina State Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Agency (EPAGRI), Brazil 
2.Conservation and distribution of cassava genetic resources: Michael Abberton, Badara Gueye, Tchamba Marimagne and Folarin Soyode, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
3.Developing new cassava varieties: tools, techniques and strategies: Hernán Ceballos, Nelson Morante, Fernando Calle, Jorge Lenis and Sandra Salazar, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
4.Molecular approaches in cassava breeding: Luis Augusto Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
5.Marker-assisted selection in cassava breeding: Ismail Y. Rabbi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
6.Advances in genetic modification of cassava: P. Zhang, Q. Ma, M. Naconsie, X. Wu, W. Zhou, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China and J. Yang, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, China 
 
Part 2 Breeding improved cassava varieties 
7.Breeding cassava for higher yield: Piya Kittipadakul, Pasajee Kongsil and Chalermpol Phumichai, Kasetsart University, Thailand; and Shelley H. Jansky, USDA-ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit and University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA 
8.Breeding, delivery, use and benefits of bio-fortified cassava: Elizabeth Parkes and Olufemi Aina, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
9.Breeding cassava to meet consumer preferences for product quality: Adebayo Abass, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; Wasiu Awoyale, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Liberia and Kwara State University, Nigeria; and Lateef Sanni and Taofi k Shittu, Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria 
 
Part 3 Managing pests and diseases 
10.Diseases affecting cassava: James Legg, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania; and Elizabeth Alvarez, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia 
11.Integrated management of arthropod pests of cassava: the case of Southeast Asia: Ignazio Graziosi and Kris A.G. Wyckhuys, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Vietnam 
12.Weed control in cassava cropping systems: S. Hauser and F. Ekeleme, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria 
ISBN: 9781786760043 ¦ Pub date: August 2017 ¦ Extent: 322 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Beverage and sugar crops 

Climate-smart production of coffee Edited by Professor Reinhold Muschler 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Improving social and environmental sustainability 
1.The global importance of coffee production: Carlos Brando, P&A Marketing, Brazil 
2.The coffee sector and its importance for smallholder farmers: Gabriele Regio, Oxfam, Italy 
3.Environmental and social impact assessment of coffee production: Jűrgen Pohlan, University of Bonn, Germany 
4.Speciality coffees as drivers of change: Jűrgen Pohlan, University of Bonn, Germany 
5.Fair-trade coffee: how fair is ‘fair’?: Ruud Bronkhorst, InfoBridge Foundation, The Netherlands 
6.Advances in Arabica coffee breeding: developing and selecting the right varieties: Alvaro Gaitan, CENICAFE, Colombia 
7.Optimizing post-harvest practices in coffee cultivation: Carlos Brando, P&A Marketing, Brazil 
 
Part 2 Sustainable pest and disease management 
8.Insect pests affecting coffee: an overview: Luis Fernando Aristizábal, Consultant, USA 
9.Diseases affecting coffee: an overview: S. Daivasikamani, Central Coffee Research Institute (CRRI), India 
10.Coffee leaf rust: John Vandermeer, University of Michigan, USA 
11.Coffee wilt disease: Julie Flood, CABI, UK 
12.Integrated management of nematode pests of coffee: Regina Carneiro, Embrapa, Brazil 
13.Integrated management of soil-borne insect and fungal pests of coffee: Regina Carneiro, Embrapa, Brazil 
14.Integrated weed management in coffee production: Claudio Pagotto, Universidad Federal de Vicosa, Brazil 
ISBN: 9781786764836 ¦ Pub date: September 2022 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £150/$195/€180 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of cocoa Edited by Professor Pathmanathan Umaharan 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Genetic resources and breeding 
1.Taxonomy and classification of cacao: Ranjana Bhattacharjee, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria; and Malachy Akoroda, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Nigeria 
2.Conserving and exploiting cocoa genetic resources: the key challenges: Brigitte Laliberté, Bioversity International, Italy; Michelle End, INGENIC (The International Group for Genetic Improvement of Cocoa), UK; Nicholas Cryer, Mondelez International, UK; Andrew Daymond, University of Reading, UK; Jan Engels, Bioversity International, Italy; Albertus Bernardus Eskes, formerly CIRAD and Bioversity International, France; Martin Gilmour, Barry Callebaut, USA; Philippe Lachenaud, Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement, France; Wilbert Phillips-Mora, Center for Tropical Agriculture Research and Education, Costa Rica; Chris Turnbull, Cocoa Research Association Ltd., UK; Pathmanathan Umaharan, Cocoa Research Centre, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago; Dapeng Zhang, USDA-ARS, USA; and Stephan Weise, Bioversity International, Italy 
3.The role of gene banks in preserving the genetic diversity of cacao: Lambert A. Motilal, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago 
4.Safe handling and movement of cocoa germplasm for breeding: Andrew Daymond, University of Reading, UK 
5.Developments in cacao breeding programmes in Africa and the Americas: Dário Ahnert, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Brazil; and Albertus Bernardus Eskes, formerly CIRAD and Bioversity International, France 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
6.Cocoa plant propagation techniques to supply farmers with improved planting materials: Michelle End, INGENIC (The International Group for Genetic Improvement of Cocoa), UK; Brigitte Laliberté, Bioversity International, Italy; Rob Lockwood, Consultant, UK; Augusto Roberto Sena Gomes, Consultant, Brazil; George Andrade Sodré, CEPLAC/CEPEC, Brazil; and Mark Guiltinan and Siela Maximova, The Pennsylvania State University, USA 
7.The potential of somatic embryogenesis for commercial-scale propagation of elite cacao varieties: Siela N. Maximova and Mark J. Guiltinan, The Pennsylvania State University, USA 
8.Good agronomic practices in cocoa cultivation: rehabilitating cocoa farms: Richard Asare, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ghana; Victor Afari-Sefa, World Vegetable Center, Benin; Sander Muilerman, Wageningen University, The Netherlands; and Gilbert J. Anim-Kwapong, Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana, Ghana 
9.Improving soil and nutrient management for cacao cultivation: Didier Snoeck and Bernard Dubos, CIRAD, UR Systèmes de pérennes, France 
 
Part 3 Diseases and pests 
10.Cocoa diseases: witches' broom: Jorge Teodoro De Souza, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Fernando Pereira Monteiro, Federal University of Lavras and UNIVAG Centro Universitário, Brazil; Maria Alves Ferreira, Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; and Karina Peres Gramacho and Edna Dora Martins Newman Luz, Comissão Executiva do Plano da Lavoura Cacaueira (CEPLAC), Brazil 
11.Frosty pod rot, caused by Moniliophthora roreri: Ulrike Krauss, Palm Integrated Services and Solutions (PISS) Ltd., Saint Lucia 
12.Cocoa diseases: vascular-streak dieback: David I. Guest, University of Sydney, Australia; and Philip J. Keane, LaTrobe University, Australia 
13.Insect pests affecting cacao: Leïla Bagny Beilhe, Régis Babin and Martijn ten Hoopen, CIRAD, France 
14.Nematode pests of cocoa: Samuel Orisajo, Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Nigeria 
15.Advances in pest- and disease-resistant cocoa varieties: Christian Cilas and Olivier Sounigo, CIRAD, France; Bruno Efombagn and Salomon Nyassé, Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), Cameroon; Mathias Tahi, CNRA, Côte d’Ivoire; and Sarah M. Bharath, Meridian Cacao, USA 
 
Part 4 Safety and sensory quality 
16.Improving best practice with regard to pesticide use in cocoa: M. A. Rutherford, J. Crozier and J. Flood, CABI, UK; and S. Sastroutomo, CABI-SEA, Malaysia 
17.Mycotoxins in cocoa: causes, detection and control: Mary A. Egbuta, Southern Cross University, Australia 
18.Analysing sensory and processing quality of cocoa: Darin A. Sukha and Naailah A. Ali, The University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago 
 
Part 5 Sustainability 
19.Climate change and cocoa cultivation: Christian Bunn, Fabio Castro and Mark Lundy, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia; and Peter Läderach, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Vietnam 
20.Analysis and design of the shade canopy of cocoa-based agroforestry systems: Eduardo Somarriba, CATIE, Costa Rica; Luis Orozco-Aguilar, University of Melbourne, Australia; Rolando Cerda, CATIE, Costa Rica; and Arlene López-Sampson, James Cook University, Australia 
21.Organic cocoa cultivation: Amanda Berlan, De Montfort University, UK 
22.Cocoa sustainability initiatives: the impacts of cocoa sustainability initiatives in West Africa: Verina Ingram, Yuca Waarts and Fedes van Rijn, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
23.Supporting smallholders in achieving more sustainable cocoa cultivation: the case of West Africa: Paul Macek, World Cocoa Foundation, USA; Upoma Husain and Krystal Werner, Georgetown University, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761682 ¦ Pub date: August 2018 ¦ Extent: 588 pages ¦ Price £230/$300/€275 

Global tea science - Current status and future needs  Edited by Dr VS Sharma and Dr Kumudini Gunasekare 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Tea Breeding and Germplasm 
1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of tea: Jian-Qiang Ma and Liang Chen, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
2.Mapping and exploiting the tea genome: Xinchao Wang, Xinyuan Hao, Lu Wang and Yajun Yang, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
3.Advances in genetic modification of tea: Mainaak Mukhopadhyay, University of Kalyani, India; Tapan Kumar Mondal, National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, India 
 
Part 2 Cultivation and Agronomy 
4.Planting and cultivation of tea: M. A. Wijeratne, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
5.The effect of cultivation techniques on tea quality: P. Okinda Owuor, Maseno University, Kenya 
6.The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in tea cultivation: Shipra Singh and Anita Pandey, G. B. Pant National Institute of Himalayan Environment and Sustainable Development, India; and Lok Man S. Palni, Graphic Era University, India 
7.The role of microbes in tea cultivation: P. N. Bhattacharyya and S. R. Sarmah, Tocklai Tea Research Institute, India 
 
Part 3 Plant Protection 
8.Diseases affecting tea plants: G. D. Sinniah, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
9.Insect pests of tea: shot-hole borers, termites and nematodes: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
10.Insect pests of tea: caterpillars and other seasonal, occasional and minor pests: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
11.Integrated pest management of tea insect pests: Nalini C. Gnanapragasam, Former Deputy Director (Research), Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka; currently Agricultural Tea Consultant - Malwatte Valley Plantations PLC, Sri Lanka 
12.Pesticide residues in tea: challenges in detection and control: A. K. Barooah, Tocklai Tea Research Institute, India 
 
Part 4 Tea Chemistry and Phytochemicals 
13.Instrumentation and methodology for the quantification of phytochemicals in tea: Ting Zhang, China University of Geosciences and Huanggang Normal University, China; Xiaojian Lv, Yin Xu, Lanying Xu and Tao Long, Huanggang Normal University, China; Chi-Tang Ho, Rutgers University, USA; and Shiming Li, Huanggang Normal University, China and Rutgers University, USA 
14.The potential role for tea in combating chronic diseases: Chung S. Yang, Rutgers University, USA 
 
Part 5 Sustainability 
15.Tea cultivation under changing climatic conditions: Wenyan Han, Xin Li, Peng Yan, Liping Zhang and Golam Jalal Ahammed, Tea Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRI, CAAS), China 
16.Assessing and reducing the environmental impact of tea cultivation: Thushari Lakmini Wijeratne, Tea Research Institute, Sri Lanka 
17.Cultivation, production and marketing of organic tea: Nikhil Ghosh Hajra, Organic Tea and Agri-horticultural Consulting, India 
18.Supporting smallholders in tea cultivation: Atik Dharmadi, Research Institute for Tea and Cinchona, Indonesia 
ISBN: 9781786761606 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 558 pages ¦ Price £210/$275/€250 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of coffee - Breeding and quality traits  Edited by Dr Philippe Lashermes 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Diversity and genome evolution in coffee: Philippe Lashermes and Marie-Christine Combes, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), France 
2.Coffee tree growth and environmental acclimation: Fabio M. DaMatta, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil 
3.Environmental and genetic effects on coffee seed biochemical composition and quality: Thierry Joët and Stéphane Dussert, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), France; 
4.Ensuring the genetic diversity of coffee: Sarada Krishnan, Denver Botanic Gardens, USA 
5.Developing varieties of Arabica coffee: Herbert A. M. van der Vossen, Coffee Breeding Consultant, The Netherlands 
6.Developing varieties of Robusta coffee: N. Surya Prakash, Central Coffee Research Institute, India 
7.Developments in molecular breeding techniques in Robusta coffee: Alan Carvalho Andrade, Embrapa Café/Inovacafé, Brazi
8.Breeding caffeine-free coffee beans: Chifumi Nagai, Hawaii Agriculture Research Center, USA; and Jean-Jacques Rakotomalala, Centre National de la Recherche Appliquée au Développement Rural, Madagascar 
9.Disseminating improved coffee varieties for sustainable production: Charles Lambot and Juan Carlos Herrera, Nestlé R&D Center, France 
 
Part 2 Quality traits 
10.Chemical composition of coffee beans: an overview: Michael N. Clifford, University of Surrey, UK; Iziar A. Ludwig, Universitat de Lleida, Spain; and Alan Crozier, University of California-Davis, USA 
11.Bioactive compounds in coffee beans with beneficial health properties: Ningjian Liang, Kaiwen Mu and David Kitts, University of British Columbia, Canada 
12.Beneficial compounds from coffee leaves: Claudine Campa, UMR IPME, France; and Arnaud Petitvallet, Wize Monkey, Canada 
13.Nutritional and health effects of coffee: Adriana Farah, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 
14.Advances in research on coffee flavour compounds: Roberto Buffo, National University of Tucumán, Argentina 
15.Harmful compounds in coffee: Noel Durand, CIRAD, France; and Angélique Fontana, University of Montpellier, France 
16.Flavour as the common thread for coffee quality along the value chain: Mario R. Fernández-Alduenda, Coffee Quality Institute, USA 
17.Metabolomics as a powerful tool for coffee authentication: Sastia P. Putri and Eiichiro Fukusaki, Osaka University, Japan 
18.Life cycle analysis and the carbon footprint of coffee value chains: Louis Bockel and Laure-Sophie Schiettecatte, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, Italy 
ISBN: 9781786761521 ¦ Pub date: January 2018 ¦ Extent: 410 pages ¦ Price £190/$245/€230 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sugarcane Volume 1: Cultivation techniques, quality and sustainability Edited by Professor Philippe Rott 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Cultivation techniques 
1.The development of sugarcane cultivation: Louis Jean Claude Autrey, International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT), Mauritius; Salem Saumtally and Asha Dookun-Saumtally, Mauritius Sugarcane Industry Research Institute (MSIRI), Mauritius 
2.Crop modelling to support sustainable sugarcane cultivation: Abraham Singels, University of Kwazulu-Natal and University of Pretoria, South Africa 
3.The Sustainable Sugarcane Initiative: Biksham Gujja and U. S. Natarajan, AgSri Agricultural Services Pvt. Ltd., India; and Norman Uphoff, Cornell University, USA 
4.Good planting and cultivation practices in sugarcane production: Bernard L. Schroeder, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Andrew W. Wood, Tanglewood Agricultural Services, Australia; David V. Calcino and Danielle M. Skocaj, Sugar Research Australia Limited, Australia; Alan P. Hurney, Edmonton, Australia; and Peter G. Allsopp, Seventeen Mile Rocks, Australia 
5.Improving soil management in sugarcane cultivation: Paul White and Richard Johnson, Sugar Research Unit– USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Improving nutrient management in sugarcane cultivation: Gaspar H. Korndörfer, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil 
7.Advances in sugarcane irrigation for optimisation of water supply: Jean-Louis Chopart, AGERconsult, France (Section 3.2 contributed by M. T. Sall, B. Ahondokpe, and G. Walter, Senegalese Sugar Company, Senegal) 
8.Best management practices for maintaining water quality in sugarcane cultivation: Jehangir H. Bhadha, University of Florida, USA; and Bernard L. Schroeder, University of Southern Queensland, Australia 
9.Precision agriculture and sugarcane production – a case study from the Burdekin region of Australia: R. G. V. Bramley, CSIRO, Australia; T. A. Jensen, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; A. J. Webster, CSIRO, Australia; and A. J. Robson, University of New England, Australia 
10.Advances in harvesting and transport of sugarcane: Rianto van Antwerpen, South African Sugarcane Research Institute and University of the Free State, South Africa; Philipus Daniel Riekert van Heerden, South African Sugarcane Research Institute and University of Pretoria, South Africa; Peter Tweddle, South African Sugarcane Research Institute, South Africa; Ronald Ng Cheong and Vivian Rivière, Mauritius Sugarcane Industry Research Institute (MSIRI), Mauritius 
11.Cultivating sugarcane for use in bioenergy applications: key issues: Hardev S. Sandhu, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Quality and sustainability 
12.Analyzing the processing quality of sugarcane: Charley Richard, Sugar Processing Research Institute and the New York Sugar Trade Laboratory, USA 
13.Predicting the effect of climate change on sugarcane cultivation: Fábio R. Marin, University of São Paulo (USP) - Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Brazil; Daniel S. P. Nassif, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil; and Leandro G. Costa, Murilo S. Vianna, Kassio Carvalho and Pedro R. Pereira, University of São Paulo (USP) - Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Brazil 
14.Mitigating the impact of environmental, social and economic issues on sugar cane cultivation to achieve sustainability: Kathy Hurly and Richard Nicholson, SA Canegrowers, South Africa; Carolyn Baker and Michelle Binedell, South African Sugarcane Research Institute, South Africa; Vaughan Koopman, WWF-SA, South Africa; Graeme Leslie, Consultant Entomologist, South Africa; Geoff Maher, Zambia Sugar, Zambia; and Scott Pryor, North Dakota State University, USA 
15.Sugarcane as a renewable resource for sustainable futures: Francis X. Johnson, Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden 
ISBN: 9781786761446 ¦ Pub date: November 2017 ¦ Extent: 360 pages ¦ Price £160/$210/€190 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of sugarcane Volume 2: Breeding, pests and diseases Edited by Professor Philippe Rott 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Sugarcane genome sequencing and genetic mapping: Xiping Yang and Ramkrishna Kandel, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA; Jian Song, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Dezhou University, China; Qian You, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China; Mengjuan Wang, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China; Jianping Wang, University of Florida (Gainesville), USA and Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China 
2.Advances in understanding of sugarcane plant growth and physiology: Frederik C. Botha, Sugar Research Australia and the University of Queensland, Australia 
3.Ensuring and exploiting the genetic diversity of sugarcane: Anna Hale, USDA-ARS, USA; Phillip Jackson, CSIRO, Australia; and James R. Todd, USDA-ARS, USA 
4.Advances in conventional sugarcane breeding programmes: Phillip Jackson, CSIRO, Australia 
5.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of sugarcane: Per McCord, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Genetic improvement of sugarcane by transgenic, intragenic and genome editing technologies: Fredy Altpeter and Ratna Karan, University of Florida, USA 
 
Part 2 Progress in understanding and managing diseases, pests and weeds 
7.Ensuring biosecurity in sugarcane cultivation: Nicole Thompson, Sugar Research Australia (SRA), Australia 
8.Viral metagenomics and sugarcane pathogens: Philippe Roumagnac, Jean-Heinrich Daugrois and Denis Filloux, CIRAD, France; and Dimitre Mollov, USDA-ARS, USA 
9.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: red rot: R. Viswanathan, A. Ramesh Sundar, R. Selvakumar and P. Malathi, ICAR-Sugarcane Breeding Institute, India 
10.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: smut: Claudia B. Monteiro Vitorello, Patricia Dayane Carvalho Schaker, Juliana Benevenuto, Natália de Sousa Teixeira e Silva and Sintia Silva de Almeida, University of São Paulo, Brazil 
11.Progress in understanding fungal diseases affecting sugarcane: rusts: R. Stuart Rutherford, South African Sugarcane Research Institute (SASRI) and University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa 
12.Progress in understanding viruses affecting sugarcane: Kathy Braithwaite, Sugar Research Australia (SRA), Australia 
13.Recent progress in understanding three major bacterial diseases of sugarcane: gumming, leaf scald and ratoon stunting: Monique Royer, Isabelle Pieretti, and Stéphane Cociancich, CIRAD, France; and Philippe Rott, University of Florida, USA 
14.Managing the soil biological community to improve soil health and reduce losses from nematode pests: Graham R. Stirling, Biological Crop Protection Pty Ltd, Australia 
15.Progress in understanding and managing insect pests affecting sugarcane: François-Régis Goebel, CIRAD, France; Julien M. Beuzelin, University of Florida, USA; and Mike J. Way, South African Sugarcane Research Institute (SASRI), South Africa 
16.Integrated disease management strategies in sugarcane cultivation: Jack C. Comstock and Sushma G. Sood, USDA-ARS, USA 
17.Integrated weed management in sugarcane cultivation: Calvin Odero, University of Florida, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761484 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 468 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 

Oil bearing crops 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of soybeans Volume 1: Breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Professor Henry T. Nguyen 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding 
1.Advances in understanding soybean physiology and growth: M. B. Zhang and X. T. Chu, Centre for Integrative Legume Research, University of Queensland, Australia; H. N. Su, University of Queensland, Australia, and National Navel Orange Engineering Research Center, Gannan Normal University, China; A. H. Hastwell, P. M. Gresshoff and B. J. Ferguson, Centre for Integrative Legume Research, University of Queensland, Australia 
2.Maintaining and utilizing the genetic diversity of soybeans: Randall Nelson, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
3.Advances in conventional soybean breeding techniques: E. E. Large, E. Beche, D. Mutoni and A. Scaboo, University of Missouri, USA 
4.Mapping the soybean genome: Xiaobo Wang, Anhui Agricultural University, China; and Lijuan Qiu, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
5.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of soybeans: T. Vuong, University of Missouri, USA; and D. Walker, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
6.Advances in genetic modification of soybeans: Wensheng Hou, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China 
7.Advances in the drought and heat resistance of soybean: Heng Ye, Babu Valliyodan, Li Song, J. Grover Shannon, Pengyin Chen and Henry T. Nguyen, University of Missouri, USA 
8.Towards improving the salt tolerance of soybean: Ailin Liu, Wai-Lun Cheung, Wai-Shing Yung, Carol Lee, Fuk-Ling Wong, Kit-Wah Siu and Hon-Ming Lam, Center for Soybean Research of the Partner State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology and School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China 
9.Advances in flood-tolerant varieties of soybean: C. Wu and W. Hummer, University of Arkansas, USA; P. Chen, G. Shannon, H. Ye and H. T. Nguyen, University of Missouri, USA; G. Kaur and J. Orlowski, Mississippi State University, USA; T. Carter, USDA-ARS, USA; and B. Buckley, Louisiana State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Cultivation techniques 
10.Modelling the effects of temperature and photoperiod on soybean reproductive development: H. Yang, University of Nebraska, USA 
11.Defining and implementing best management practices in soybean production: Daniel B. Reynolds, Mississippi State University, USA 
12.Sustainable soybean production research and practice: contrasting case studies from three soybean production areas: Roger W. Elmore, Rodrigo Werle and Charles Wortmann, University of Nebraska, USA; Phinehas Tukamuhabwa, Makerere University, Uganda; and Nathan Mueller, University of Nebraska, USA 
13.Supporting smallholders in soybean cultivation: the example of Zimbabwe: Byron Zamasiya and Kefasi Nyikahadzoi, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe 
ISBN: 9781786761125 ¦ Pub date: May 2018 ¦ Extent: 340 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of soybeans Volume 2: Diseases, pests, food and other uses Edited by Professor Henry T. Nguyen 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Diseases, pests and weeds 
1.Oomycete and fungal pathogens of soybean: Anne E. Dorrance, The Ohio State University, USA 
2.Bacterial and viral diseases affecting soybean production: Glen L. Hartman, USDA-ARS and University of Illinois, USA 
3.Nematode pathogens of soybean: T. L. Niblack and H. D. Lopez-Nicora, The Ohio State University, USA 
4.Key factors limiting sustainable insect pest management in soybeans: M. E. O'Neal, Iowa State University, USA and R. Cox, EarthEmpower Consulting and Investment, Mexico 
5.Advances in disease-resistant varieties of soybean: David R. Walker, USDA-ARS, USA 
6.Advances in pest-resistant varieties of soybean: Shichen Zhang and Dechun Wang, Michigan State University, USA 
7.Integrated weed management in soybean cultivation: Bob Hartzler, Iowa State University, USA 
 
Part 2 Food and other uses 
8.Nutritional, nutraceutical and functional properties of soybeans: Suzanne Hendrich, Iowa State University, USA 
9.Improving the nutritional value of soybean: Istvan Rajcan and Jocelyne Letarte, University of Guelph, Canada 
10.Allergens in soybean: Eliot M. Herman, University of Arizona, USA 
11.Nutritional considerations for soybean meal use in poultry diets: Justin Fowler, University of Georgia, USA 
ISBN: 9781786761163 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 286 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of oil palm Volume 1: Introduction, breeding and cultivation techniques Edited by Professor Alain Rival 

 
Table of contents 
 
Part 1 Setting the scene 
1.The palm oil market: growth and trends: Stefano Savi, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, Malaysia 
2.Research trends in oil palm cultivation: Yuen May Choo, formerly The International Society for Fat Research (ISF), USA; and YewAi Tan, formerly Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
3.Sustainability pathways in oil palm cultivation: a comparison of Indonesia, Colombia and Cameroon: Ahmad Dermawan, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; and Otto Hospes, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
4.The palm oil governance complex: progress, problems and gaps: Pablo Pacheco, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; Patrice Levang, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia and Research Institute for Development (IRD), France; Ahmad Dermawan, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Indonesia; and George Schoneveld, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Kenya 
 
Part 2 Plant physiology and breeding 
5.Advances in understanding oil palm reproductive development: Estelle Jaligot, CIRAD, UMR DIADE (IRD, UM), France 
6.Diversity in the genetic resources of oil palm: N. Rajanaidu, A. Mohd Din, M. Marhalil, A. Norziha, O. A. Meilina, A. M. Fadila, A. B. Nor Azwani, L. Adelina, H. Zulkifli, S. Wan Salmiah and A. Kushairi, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
7.Advances in conventional breeding techniques for oil palm: Benoît Cochard and Tristan Durand-Gasselin, PalmElit SAS, France 
8.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of palm oil: Rajinder Singh, Chan Pek Lan, Maizura Ithnin and Umi Salamah Ramli, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
9.Advances in the genetic modification of oil palm: Denis J. Murphy, Head of Genomics and Computational Biology Research Group, University of South Wales, United Kingdom 
 
Part 3 Cultivation techniques 
10.Modelling crop growth and yield in palm oil cultivation: Christopher Teh Boon Sung, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia; and Cheah See Siang, Sime Darby Research Sdn. Bhd., Malaysia 
11.Improving soil health and crop nutrition in oil palm cultivation: Jean-Pierre Caliman, Suhardi and Pujianto, Smart Research Institute, Indonesia 
12.Maintaining soil health in oil palm cultivation: Bernard Dubos and Didier Snoeck, CIRAD, France 
13.Use of palm oil for biofuel: Jean-Marc Roda, CIRAD, France and Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
ISBN: 9781786761040 ¦ Pub date: February 2018 ¦ Extent: 306 pages ¦ Price £140/$180/€170 

Achieving sustainable cultivation of oil palm Volume 2: Diseases, pests, quality and sustainability Edited by Professor Alain Rival 

 
Table of contents  
 
Part 1 Diseases and pests 
1.Fungal diseases affecting oil palm: Tan Joon Sheong, Lee Yang Ping and Sharifah Shahrul Rabiah Syed Alwee, Felda Global Ventures Research and Development, Malaysia; Létizia Camus-Kulandaivelu, Maxime Mercière, Alba Zaremski and Frédéric Breton CIRAD, France; and Christophe Klopp, INRA, France 
2.Diseases affecting oil palm: Elizabeth Alvarez, CIAT, Colombia 
3.Insect pests affecting oil palms: Laurence Beaudoin-Ollivier, Université de Montpellier and CIRAD, France 
4.Integrated pest management in sustainable palm oil production: Edgar Clive Turner and Julie Hinsch, University of Cambridge, UK 
5.The integrated management of bud rot disease and Phytophthora palmivora in oil palm: Gerardo Martinez, José Ignacio Sanz, Gabriel Torres, Greicy Sarria, Diana Velez, Franky Zuñiga, Yuri Mestizo and Francia Varon, Colombian Oil Palm Research Center – Cenipalma, Colombia 
6.Advances in disease-resistant oil palm varieties: Tristan Durand-Gasselin, Benoît Cochard and Hubert de Franqueville, PalmElit-CIRAD, France 
 
Part 2 Nutritional and sensory quality 
7.Bioactive compounds in oil palm: Ravigadevi Sambanthamurthi, Ng Mei Han and Choo Yuen May, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
8.Palm oil and health: Jean-Michel Lecerf, Institut Pasteur de Lille, France 
9.The nutritional value of red palm oil: Hélène Delisle, University of Montreal, Canada 
 
Part 3 Sustainability and supporting smallholders 
10.Life cycle assessments of oil palm products: Cécile Bessou, CIRAD, France; Heinz Stichnothe, Thünen Institute of Agricultural Technology, Germany; Amir F. N. Abdul-Manan, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia; and Shabbir Gheewala, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand 
11.Life cycle assessment (LCA) of palm oil in practice: the example of Malaysia: Vijaya Subramaniam, Zulkifli Hashim and Halimah Muhamad, Malaysian Palm Oil Board, Malaysia 
12.Modelling the environmental impacts of agriculture, focusing on oil palm: Paul N. Nelson, James Cook University, Australia; Neil Huth, CSIRO, Australia; Marcus Sheaves, James Cook University, Australia; Cécile Bessou, CIRAD, France; Lénaïc Pardon, CIRAD, France; Han She Lim, James Cook University, Australia; and Rai S. Kookana, CSIRO, Australia 
13.Certifying sustainability in oil palm cultivation: Marcel Djama, CIRAD and MOISA, University of Montpellier, France and Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia 
14.Balancing oil palm cultivation with forest and biodiversity conservation: Carl Traeholt, South East Asia Programme Director, Copenhagen Zoo, Malaysia 
15.Waste management and recycling in oil palm cultivation: Salman Zafar, BioEnergy Consult, India 
16.Understanding smallholders in oil palm cultivation: a case study from Sumatra: Pierre-Marie Bosc and Cédric Gaillard, CIRAD, France 
17.Closing yield gaps for small- and medium-scale oil palm producers: improving cultivation practices : J. I. Sanz, M. Mosquera and J. A. Beltrán, Colombian Oil Palm Research Center – Cenipalma, Colombia 
18.Artisanal mills and local production of palm oil by smallholders: Sylvain Rafflegeau, CIRAD, UPR Systèmes de Pérennes, France; Doris Nanda, Université de Yaoundé I, Cameroon; and Claude Genot, INRA-UR BIA, France 
ISBN: 9781786761088 ¦ Pub date: March 2018 ¦ Extent: 462 pages ¦ Price £180/$235/€215 
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