NEWSLETTERS 
Co-Founders Rob Burleigh and Francis Dodds share their knowledge and insights into agricultural science, publishing and the latest news at Burleigh Dodds 
To keep up to date with the release of new titles and business announcements, register for our weekly video newsletters. 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
15 September 2022 

How Crucial is Claw Trimming in Ensuring Dairy Cattle Welfare? 

dairy cow welfare, claw trimming, lameness
Lameness is one of the most economically-damaging diseases for dairy farmers, with suggestions that farmers in the UK lose £2.20 every day a single cow is lame. As well as being an economic issue, lameness is also regarded as a major welfare concern. 
 
In recent years, farmers have begun seeking out lameness prevention procedures and techniques in an attempt to offset the need for future expensive treatments. 
 
Claw trimming is arguably the most well regarded procedure for reducing the chances of a cow becoming lame. Recognised as an essential procedure, claw trimming promotes claw health by ensuring that the cow's weight is appropriately distributed between the medial and lateral claws. 
 
There are several claw trimming methods practised by dairy farmers around the globe: 
 
• Functional claw trimming or Dutch method 
• White Line method 
• White Line Atlas method 
• Kansas method 
 
Read more about this article here

Key Reference Work Considers Best Practices for Optimising Dairy Cattle Welfare 

 
Edited by 
Professor Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Particularly strong focus on understanding dairy cattle behaviour as the foundation for improving welfare in such areas as cognition and learning, pain and stress as well as social behaviour 
• Covers developments in more animal/outcome-based welfare indicators as well as advanced sensor, acoustic and video techniques for monitoring behaviour and welfare 
• Comprehensive review of welfare issues across the value chain, from calves and heifers to culling 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

grasslands, soil health, pasture
Does soil disturbance reduce the resilience of rangelands? 
 
A team of researchers, including representatives from the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, have collaborated on a new research project to ascertain the impact of soil disturbance on rangeland response to climate change. Rangelands or grasslands, are pieces of land used primarily for livestock production and biological diversity. Key findings from the study suggest that rising levels of carbon dioxide make it more difficult for rangelands to recover from climate change-related incidents. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Managing soil health for grassland 
piglet welfare, piglet rearing
Article outlines the key to successful piglet rearing 
 
For pig producers in the European Union, rearing healthy piglets is an increasingly difficult task with previous tools, such as antibiotic growth promoters, now illegal. A recent webinar series has highlighted this issue and instead emphasised how optimising piglet care can make pig production more sustainable, whilst also ensuring that higher welfare standards are met. The webinars proposed 'three pillars' that could achieve this: preparing the piglet for pre- and post-weaning challenges, protecting the gut in the post-weaning period and supporting the resilience of the weaned pig to ensure it can mitigate future challenges. 
[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Improving piglet welfare 
animal welfare, chicken welfare standards
Australia announces new welfare standards for poultry 
 
Earlier this week, Australia's Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry announced that work on a new set of poultry welfare standards has been completed. The updated Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Poultry includes plans for a phase-out of the use of conventional layer hen cages within 15 years, as well as stricter standards which detail that producers must provide environmental enrichment for their broiler breeders. [Read more here]. 
 
sheep flock, sheep disease
England's sheep flock increases for the first time in five years 
 
According to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' (DEFRA) most recent livestock survey, England's sheep flock has increased by 2% since 2021. Although a relatively small increase, this increase has been widely celebrated as it's the first in five years. As of June when the survey was completed, England's sheep flock sat at 14.9 million, with DEFRA researchers also noting a worthwhile growth in first-time breeding ewe populations. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Advances in sheep breeding 

Noteworthy Forthcoming Titles! 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
15 September 2022 

Starch in Green Bananas Suggested to Reduce the Risk of Particular Cancers by 60% 

bananas, nutraceuticals, human health
Fruit and vegetables are a natural source of vitamins and minerals which can contribute to good health. In recent years, researchers have established the important role horticultural products can play in the diets of human to ensure sufficient nutrition, whilst also reducing the chances of developing health conditions. 
 
Most recently, a team of researchers from Newcastle University, UK and the University of Leeds, UK have published the findings from a two-decade long research study which set out to determine the role of starch in preventing particular cancers. 
 
Participants in the study were instructed to take a dose of resistant starch. This dosage is seen to be equivalent to that found in a banana not completely ripened and slightly green. 
 
The research has been published in Cancer Prevention Research and is a substantial contribution to the existing research on reducing the risk of cancers in the upper part of the gut. 
 
Read more about this new research here

New Title Considers the Nutraceutical Benefits of Consuming Fruit and Vegetables 

Edited by 
Professor Victor R. Preedy, King's College London, UK and Dr Vinood B. Patel, University of Westminster, UK 
 
About the Book 
The book reviews the associated health benefits of key horticultural crops, including apples, broccoli and cranberries. 
 
It provides authoritative discussions on the nutraceutical properties of the major phytochemical compounds, including antioxidants and flavonoids, and how these properties can be optimised to prevent the onset of chronic diseases. 

We Exhibited at the New IPM Conference! 

New IPM Conference, BDS Stand
Earlier this week, our Managing Director (Rob Burleigh) and Editorial Director (Francis Dodds) travelled down to Swansea, Wales to attend and exhibit at the first New IPM Conference. 
 
Rob and Francis sat in on some great sessions that explored the growing role of biopesticides in integrated pest management (IPM) programmes, as well as what the future holds for new IPM programmes. 

Discover Our Books on IPM! 

Integrated pest management, books

News 

soil health, grasslands
Does soil disturbance reduce the resilience of rangelands? 
 
A team of researchers, including representatives from the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, have collaborated on a new research project to ascertain the impact of soil disturbance on rangeland response to climate change. Rangelands or grasslands, are pieces of land used primarily for livestock production and biological diversity. Key findings from the study suggest that rising levels of carbon dioxide make it more difficult for rangelands to recover from climate change-related incidents. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Managing soil health for grassland 
maize, smallholder farmers
Boosting maize yield through communication with smallholders 
 
Fall armyworm is a destructive pest that targets over 80 species of plants, including maize, rice and sugarcane, and costs farmers more than $10 billion annually in crop damage and losses. A new study has demonstrated the importance of educating smallholder farmers in Africa about the pest, citing a new campaign recently completed as evidence for this. The new campaign saw African farmers educated through digital and face-to-face events. Those involved with the campaign have since suggested that farmers who took part have seen an increase in their maize yields. 
[Read more here]. 
 
nutritional value, phosphorus
Larger plants do not equate to higher levels of nutritional value 
 
A team of researchers from Michigan State University, USA have made a significant breakthrough in disproving the myth that larger plants hold a higher nutritional value than their smaller counterparts. Whilst increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is seen as a positive for plant growth, it also reduces the nutritional value of plants. The researchers set out to distinguish a more informed understanding of how plants regulate phosphorus to survive and the possible impact of increased carbon dioxide levels on this. [Read more here]. 
 
apples, apple disease, Japanese apple rust
Japanese apple rust identified in Minnesota for the first time 
 
The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) have announced that a case of Japanese apple rust has been identified in the state for the first time. Native to Asia, the disease was identified by MDA staff during routine inspections of orchards and nurseries in several counties. The disease is known to cause defoliation to susceptible cultivars, however it hasn't inflicted significant damage on global apple production. Japanese apple rust has previously been identified in Wisconsin and in orchards on the East Coast. [Read more here]. 
 

New for September! 

 
Edited by 
Professor Reinhold Muschler, CATIE, Costa Rica 
 
Key Features 
• Unique focus on achieving more resilient, ‘climate-smart’ coffee cultivation 
• Distinctive agroecological approach based on improving cultivation through optimising ecosystem services 
• Comprehensive coverage of the value chain in coffee cultivation, from breeding to pest management and post-harvest practices 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
8 September 2022 

Canadian Government to Fund Improvements in Livestock Welfare Tracking 

livestock welfare, tracking technology
As a result of growing consumer concern surrounding the welfare of farmed animals, there is greater pressure on all those involved in the agri-food supply chain to ensure that animal welfare isn't compromised at any stage of production. 
 
Just this week, Canada's Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (Marie-Claude Bibeau) announced an investment of around $3 million to three different organisations involved in enhancing the tracking of animal welfare across the nation. These organisations are as follows: 
 
• The Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council 
• Animal Health Canada 
• The Canadian Cattle Identification Agency 
 
The Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council will receive up to $35,750 to refresh its current animal welfare programme designed for hatchers to ensure the safe handling of breeders, chickens, turkeys and hatched eggs. 
 
Animal Health Canada are set to receive $2.9 million of the funding, which will be used to update Canada's national codes of practice against the welfare of livestock. 
 
Finally, the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency will receive up to $52,140 to establish the effectiveness of ultra high frequency scanners used to identify cattle and trace their movements quickly. 
 
Read the full article

Key Titles Consider Best Practices for Improving the Welfare of Livestock 

 
Edited by 
Professor Christine Nicol, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, UK 
 
About the Book 
This collection summarises the wealth of recent research on understanding chicken behaviour and discusses how best to use this rich body of knowledge to optimise welfare management of broilers and layers. 
 
It features expert insights into the use of wearable, video and acoustic technologies as a means of monitoring behaviour, as well as improving current welfare protocols. 
 
Edited by 
Professor Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Particularly strong focus on understanding dairy cattle behaviour as the foundation for improving welfare in such areas as cognition and learning, pain and stress as well as social behaviour 
• Covers developments in more animal/outcome-based welfare indicators as well as advanced sensor, acoustic and video techniques for monitoring behaviour and welfare 
• Comprehensive review of welfare issues across the value chain, from calves and heifers to culling 

Must Attend Conference for Pig Scientists! 

11th Leman China Swine Conference & 2022 World Swine Industry Expo
We're delighted to share the news that we're a Media Partner for the upcoming 11th Leman China Swine Conference & 2022 World Swine Industry Expo! 
 
This year's conference will include sessions on: 
 
• Swine production 
• Disease surveillance and control 
• Biosafety 
• Diagnosis and detection 
• Swine farm restoration 
• Swine nutrition 

Discover Our Full Range of Pig Science Titles! 

Pig science titles Pig science titles

News 

newborn calf health, probiotics
Using probiotics to boost the health of newborn dairy calves 
 
An international team of researchers, have recently published the findings from a recent study which set out to determine the impact of of supplementing newborn dairy calves' diets with probiotics. Newborn calves are extremely sensitive to potentially pathogenic bacteria strains, however, the adoption of an early feed regime, coupled with good nutrition can enhance the establishment of rumen microbiota. Findings from the study detail that supplementing the diets of newborn calves enhanced rumen development and improved overall calf health.  
[Read more here]. 
 
ASF, pig vaccinations
ASF vaccination trials suspended in wake of pig deaths 
 
The news of planned vaccination trials for African Swine Fever (ASF) were greeted with great enthusiasm, especially considering that the disease has claimed the lives of over 250 million pigs in China alone. However, this week it has been announced that these vaccination trials - taking place in Vietnam, Asia - have since been suspended following the deaths of more than 12 pigs after being administered the vaccine. The vaccine has been developed by scientists working at the United States Department of Agriculture. [Read more here]. 
 
IBV, poultry disease
New research breakthrough in tackling IBV in chickens 
 
A team of researchers from The Pirbright Institute, UK have announced that they have successfully developed a vaccine which could potentially protect chickens from infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). IBV is an easily transmissible viral disease which attacks the bird's respiratory system and can compromise the bird's ability to reproduce. The researchers attempted to understand the mechanisms of weakening the virus and determined that two specific amino acids could do just that for IBV. [Read more here]. 
 
lameness, housing conditions, dairy health
Best housing conditions to prevent lameness 
 
Lameness is one of the most economically-damaging diseases for dairy farmers, with suggestions that farmers in the UK lose £2.20 each day a single cow is lame. Lameness is also a major welfare concern. A new article has explored the best flooring options which farmers can integrate into their barns to reduce the likelihood of cows in their herds suffering from lameness. The article considers the benefits and disadvantages of using grass, sand, rubber, asphalt and concrete as flooring. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Lameness in dairy cattle 

New for September! 

Edited by 
Professor Sjaak de Wit, Royal GD and University of Utrecht, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
The book reviews the wealth of recent research on the mechanisms of transmission for infectious diseases and how this understanding can be used to improve poultry flock health. 
 
By showing how poultry flock health can be optimised at different stages of production, the book showcases the extent of preventative measures available to farmers and producers, as well as how these measures can be implemented effectively to protect their flocks against disease. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
8 September 2022 

Can Conservation Agriculture Practices Revive Soils Impacted by Salinity and Sodicity? 

soil health, soil salinity, climate change
Conservation Agriculture (CA) is a regenerative farming approach focussed on soil health: mechanical disturbance of the soil is kept to a minimum, soil is permanently covered (e.g. through the use of cover crops) and there is diversity of species in cropping systems (e.g. through rotations). 
 
CA has gained significant momentum in this last decade, with more farmers recognising the benefits that good soil health can bring to crop yield and quality. 
 
An international team of researchers, with representatives from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, have recently published the findings from a long-term research project which set out to determine the effects of CA practices on soils with high levels of sodium (sodic) and salt (saline). 
 
Key findings from the study suggest that the adoption of CA practices can 'revive' soils impaired by salinity and sodicity, and in doing so, can maintain the sustainability of agri-food systems worldwide. 
 
Read the full article here

Discover Our Three-Volume Collection on Conservation Agriculture! 

Advances in Conservation Agriculture - Volume 1-3

Explore the collection here

We're Exhibiting at New IPM 2022! 

New IPM 2022
We're delighted to announce that we're an exhibitor at the upcoming New IPM Conference, taking place 12-14th September 2022 in Swansea, Wales. 
 
New IPM is a bringing together of everybody involved in the agribusiness chain, to present and discuss new innovations and how they are being implemented in crop protection. 
 
Symposium sessions will include: 
 
• Biopesticides and their role in IPM 
• DigitalCrop Monitoring 
• IPM-Compatible Formulation Technologies 
• Regulatory Partnerships to improve IPM Opportunities 
• Promising Breakthroughs for New IPM Programs 
 
Download the Conference Programme here

Our Most Recent Publication! 

In case you missed it! 
 
Last week we announced the publication of our new title Understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables
 
About the Book 
The book reviews the associated health benefits of key horticultural crops, including apples, broccoli and cranberries. 
 
It provides authoritative discussions on the nutraceutical properties of the major phytochemical compounds, including antioxidants and flavonoids, and how these properties can be optimised to prevent the onset of chronic diseases. 

News 

biocontrol agent, weed control
Researchers develop biocontrol agent to tackle major weed 
 
Flaxleaf fleabane is one of Australia's most challenging weeds to tackle, with estimates that it costs the nation's crop industry more than $40 million each year. In light of this, a group of researchers from CSIRO, Australia have developed a new biocontrol agent which they claim will aid farmers in their attempts to control the damaging weed. The biocontrol agent is in fact a rust fungus (Puccina cnici-oleracei) which is known to infect flaxleaf fleabane and destroy the plant's tissues, in turn restricting it from growing. [Read more here]. 
 
seaweed, algae
Can seaweed alleviate the global food crisis? 
 
A team of researchers from Tel-Aviv University and the Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research Institute have developed a new piece of technology which is claimed to further enhance the growth of seaweed. Several varieties of seaweed were grown in close proximity to fish farming systems, each reared under different environmental conditions. The researchers claim that this variety of conditions further infused the seaweed with additional nutrients, proteins, dietary fibres and minerals essential to advancing human and animal health. 
[Read more here]. 
 
coffee production, environment
What are the key environmental concerns in coffee production? 
 
Coffee is one of the most highly traded commodities in the world, with suggestions that UK consumers spend £3.9 billion on coffee each year. Because of this demand, coffee production is considered a large-scale operation and one that challenges environmental conservation and preservation. A new article has explored the key environmental issues currently concerning global coffee production, including its large carbon footprint, as well as the strategies that can implemented to establish more climate-smart coffee production. [Read more here]. 
 
heat-tolerant crops, climate change
Selecting heat-tolerant crop varieties using sensor technology 
 
As a result of climate change, erratic weather conditions are continuing to wreck havoc on crop yields worldwide. With the earth warming, rainfall is becoming less frequent and crops are suffering during the prolonged periods of drought. With this in mind, new research has explored the potential of using intelligent field robots and x-ray technology as a means of aiding plant breeders in selecting heat-tolerant and drought-resistant varieties of wheat. The robot is equipped with the ability to produce 3D images which allows the breeder to 'look inside' the crop and assess its performance. [Read more here]. 
 

New Open Access Chapter 

 
Title 
Modifying mesophyll conductance to optimise photosynthesis in crops 
 
Chapter Abstract 
This chapter will describe each factor contributing to the resistance to CO2 diffusion within C3 leaves and discuss research efforts to overcome these resistances and improve the CO2 concentration at the site of carboxylation. 
 
Access the chapter here
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
1 September 2022 

FAO Announces New Initiative to Support Caribbean Farmers in Their Fight Against ASF 

ASF, swine disease
The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations have recently announced a new initiative which will see over 30,000 farmers from the Caribbean benefit from veterinary support and training programmes designed to control outbreaks of African swine fever (ASF) in the region. 
 
Farmers and producers from Haiti and the Dominican Republic will be exposed to resources which will enable them to establish prevention plans, should ASF make another appearance in the region. ASF was most recently detected in the Dominican Republic in July of last year - the first recorded outbreak since the 1980s. 
 
The initiative has received further support from the United States Agency for International Development who have provided a grant of over $4.5 million. 
 
Read the full article here

Forthcoming Book Reviews the Development of Preventative Measures to Control Disease 

 
Edited by 
Professor Dominiek Maes, Ghent University, Belgium and Professor Joaquim Segalés, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and IRTA-CReSA, Spain 
 
About the Book 
The book addresses recent developments in disease prevention, focussing on how farmers and producers can utilise feed management and housing to optimise pig health, as well as the role of vaccine development in preventing the onset of endemic and emerging diseases in pigs. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

poultry health, poultry welfare, virtual reality
Can virtual reality boost poultry health and welfare? 
 
A team of researchers from Iowa State University, USA have recently published the findings from a research study which set out to determine whether virtual reality could be used to improve the health and welfare of poultry. The researchers showed hens living in housed environments simulated videos of poultry in free-range environments. The researchers reported that exposure to the videos reduced the number of stress indicators present in the hens' blood and gut microbiota. [Read more here]. 
 
immune response, dairy cow breeding, heat stress
Can immune response influence a cow's tolerance to heat? 
 
Heat stress is a major issue for dairy farmers, and one that has only been heightened as a result of increasing temperatures worldwide due to climate change. As well as being a huge welfare concern, cows suffering from heat stress also yield less milk. A new study by researchers at the University of Guelph, Canada has explored the relationship between a cow's immune response and the likelihood of experiencing heat stress. Key findings determine that cows with a high immune response have a greater tolerance for increased temperatures.  
[Read more here]. 
 
sheep, sheep health, sheep disease
Using augmented reality to identify key sheep diseases 
 
Sheep farmers and producers in Australia are receiving greater support from an array of Australian governing bodies, including Animal Health Australia, in their fight against economically damaging diseases of sheep. The latest showing of support comes in the development of a new piece of augmented reality (AR) technology which can generate a flock of AR sheep, some diseased and some healthy. With this tool, farmers will be far better equipped to visually identify when a sheep is suffering from the effects of a disease. [Read more here]. 
 
mastitis, dairy cattle
Economic approaches to controlling mastitis in dairy cattle 
 
Mastitis is recognised as one of the most economically damaging diseases of dairy cattle, with suggestions that it costs the global dairy industry anywhere from $19.7 - $32 billion annually. A new article has explored these economic losses in more detail and the impact it has on milk production, as well as the control programmes that have been proposed for preventing mastitis in herds. Additionally, the article explores emerging economic approaches to controlling mastitis, including drug therapy, housing and sanitation. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mastitis in dairy cattle 

Introducing Our New YouTube Series! 

We've recently launched a new video series on our YouTube channel - Five Things You'll Learn From... 
 
In this series, we explore five of the key takeaways you'll get after reading our recently published books! 
 
Check out our latest video below on the Five Things You'll Learn from our new title, Advances in precision livestock farming

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
1 September 2022 

New Book Reviews the Health Benefits of Key Horticultural Crops 

 
We're pleased to announce the publication of our brand new title Understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables
 
The book has been edited by Professor Victor R. Preedy of King's College London, UK and Dr Vinood B. Patel of the University of Westminster, UK. 
 
By providing a comprehensive insight into the human health benefits of fruit and vegetables, the book highlights the emergence of a more sustainable, alternative method to preventing the onset of disease with less reliance on overburdened healthcare systems. 

UK Research Highlights the Potential of Urban Agriculture and its Impact on Crop Yield 

urban agriculture, crop yields
Urban agriculture or urban farming is an innovative practice in which food is cultivated, processed and distributed in urban and peri-urban areas. Arguably the most popular examples of urban agriculture are vertical and rooftop farming. 
 
With global food production needing to mirror the increasing population, there is a greater emphasis on utilising urban areas (including cities and metropolis') to grow food, instead of relying solely on traditional rural areas. 
 
A new study, led by researchers at Lancaster University, UK has assessed the impact of urban agricultural practices on the yields of commonly grown crops, such as: 
 
• Cucumbers 
• Potatoes 
• Lettuces 
 
Using data collected from over 50 countries worldwide, the researchers were able to determine that crops grown in urban environments can match - and sometimes exceed - the yield of the same crop grown in a conventional rural environment. 
 
Read the full article here

Authoritative Reference Work Explores the Benefits of Urban Agriculture 

 
Edited by 
Professor Johannes S. C. Wiskerke, Wageningen University, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
Chapters first discuss ways of building urban agriculture, from planning and business models to building social networks to support local supply chains. 
 
The book also assesses challenges and improvements in irrigation, waste management, composting/soil nutrition and pest management. 
 
Cover image: Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

CRISPR, spotted wing drosophila
Using CRISPR technology to tackle invasive global crop pest 
 
Drosophila suzukii - more commonly known as the spotted-wing drosophila - is an invasive pest of fruit which is claimed to be responsible for millions of pounds worth of crop losses each year. A team of researchers from the University of California - San Diego, USA have focussed the efforts of their new study on utilising CRISPR-based technology as a means of controlling the pest. The technology uses CRISPR to edit the genes that determine the sex of the pest, allowing only sterile male eggs to hatch. [Read more here]. 
 
soybean yields, photosynthesis
Bioengineering photosynthesis to increase soybean yields 
 
An international team of researchers, including representatives from the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA have made a memorable research breakthrough. For the first time, researchers have proven that multigene bioengineering of photosynthesis can dramatically increase the yield of major food crops, primarily soybeans, without compromising product quality. Those involved with the project have spent more than a decade working towards this goal. [Read more here]. 
 
soil erosion, soil health
Best practices for mitigating soil erosion 
 
As a direct result of climate change, weather patterns continue to fluctuate, with some countries experiencing prolonged periods of drought, and others experiencing severe rainfall. However, for farmers in the UK, they have experienced both this summer and a new article has explored the effects of drastic weather changes on soil. In addition to this, the article has highlighted five techniques farmers can implement to mitigate or reduce the effects of soil erosion as a result of heavy, continued rainfall. 
[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Soil erosion 
sorghum, flavonoids, fall armyworm
Can flavonoids from sorghum kill fall armyworm? 
 
A team of US researchers from The Pennsylvania State University and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences have collaborated on a new research project which set to determine whether flavonoids from sorghum plants could be used to mitigate the threat of fall armyworm (FAW). FAW is an economically-damaging invasive pest of staple food crops, including maize. The research detailed that FAW larvae can be killed by spraying sorghum flavonoids on the leaves of the corn. [Read more here]. 
 

International Phytobiomes Conference 2022 

International Phytobiomes Conference 2022
We're delighted to be a Media Partner for the upcoming International Phytobiomes Conference which is set to take place 13-15th September 2022, Denver, USA. 
 
The conference will bring together a broad community of U.S. and international scientists from the public and private sector as well as agricultural stakeholders to collectively advance the emerging field of phytobiome science. 

What's New to Instant Insights? 

 
Title 
Restoring degraded forests 
 
About the Insight 
This collection reviews the restoration of tropical forests and addresses the importance of implementing forest landscape restoration (FLR), as well as the challenges that arise with its implementation. 
 
Additional chapters consider the importance of exploiting the genetics of tropical tree species for the restoration of tropical forests, as well as providing an overview of the key ecosystem services delivered by tropical agroforestry systems. 

Title Insights 

Stay Updated with Our Programme! 

2022 Catalogue
Download our 2022 Catalogue! 
Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
Download our Instant Insights Catalogue! 
 
NEWSLETTERS (click to expand
Our site uses cookies. For more information, see our cookie policy. Accept cookies and close
Reject cookies Manage settings