NEWSLETTERS 
Co-Founders Rob Burleigh and Francis Dodds share their knowledge and insights into agricultural science, publishing and the latest news at Burleigh Dodds 
To keep up to date with the release of new titles and business announcements, register for our weekly video newsletters. 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
12 May 2022 

Global Food Manufacturer Launches New Project to Reduce GHG Emissions 

GHG emissions, dairy cows, livestock
Ben & Jerry's - one of the world's largest manufacturers of dairy products - have recently announced a new project they hope will help reduce the dairy sector's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by up to 50%. 
 
Titled 'Project Mootopia', the pilot study is being trialled on 15 dairy farms across the United States and will see the implementation of regenerative agricultural practices and technology to lower each farm's production of enteric methane emissions. 
 
The researchers involved in Project Mootopia plan to tackle the sector's contribution of GHG by controlling the diets of the dairy cows and ensuring they receive a high-quality forage diet combined with rumen modifiers that can aid with digestion. 
 
In addition, the researchers have also detailed that the pilot study will be utilised to assess how methane emissions from cow manure can be reduced, as well as how biodiversity can be promoted and soil health maintained. 
 
If Project Mootopia is a success, the initiative will be expanded outside of the US and performed on farms globally supplying Ben & Jerry's with dairy products. 
 
Read more here

Key Titles Review Strategies for Reducing GHG Emissions in Livestock Production 

Editor 
Dr Richard Baines, Royal Agricultural University, UK 
 
About the Book 
The book provides authoritative reviews on measuring greenhouse gas emissions from livestock as well as the range of methods that can be applied to reduce emissions, ranging from breeding to animal health and manure management. 
 
The collection also reviews nutritional approaches such as improving forage quality and the use of plant bioactive compounds and other feed supplements to limit emissions by modifying the rumen environment. 
Editor 
Dr C. S. McSweeney, CSIRO, Australia and Professor R. I. Mackie, University of Illinois, USA 
 
Key Features 
• Reviews advances in understanding the role of different types of rumen microbiota such as archea, anaerobic fungi, viruses and the rumen wall microbial community 
• Covers both the way the rumen processes fibre and protein and factors affecting outputs such as energy, lipids and methane emissions 
• Comprehensive review of the range of nutritional strategies to optimise rumen function such as the role of pasture, silage, cereal feed, plant secondary compounds and probiotics. 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

pig feed, food loss and waste
Throwaway bakery products to be used in pig feed? 
 
It has been estimated that around 1.3 billion tonnes of food fit for human consumption is wasted and/or lost each year. With rising animal feed costs, combined with the need to be more sustainable, an international team of researchers analysed whether expired food products could be a viable alternative to grains in pig feed. The researchers partially replaced the grain ingredients in pig feed with bakery and confectionary products and assessed changes in animal weight and performance. 
[Read more here]. 
 
mastitis, dairy cow health
Tackling mastitis with good herd management and nutrition 
 
Mastitis is recognised as one of the most financially devastating diseases in dairy cattle and is caused by an inflammation of the cow's mammary gland. A new article published in FeedStrategy has explored the best practices for tackling mastitis and ultimately controlling it. To prevent the occurrence of mastitis, it's key for farmers to eliminate the exposure of cow's teats to potentially harmful pathogens. Sufficient housing and ensuring good hygiene management is performed during milking is also extremely key. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mastitis in dairy cattle 
broiler growth performance, poultry
New technique to optimise broiler growth performance? 
 
A team of researchers from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, National Veterinary Institute and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden have collaborated on a new research study which aimed to assess the impact of early feed access in broiler starter diets. The study also evaluated the impact of algal extract on growth performance, organ development and gut health. Key findings from the study detail that early access to feed improved broiler growth performance, whereas access to algal extract demonstrated no change. 
[Read more here]. 
 
agtech, livestock health, pig health
Using technology to optimise pig health and nutrition 
 
With the global demand for pork products continuing to rise, pig farmers need to adapt their existing production systems, whilst also ensuring that farming sustainability isn't compromised. A new article published by Pig Progress has explored four key technological developments which can improve the way in which farmers administer feed. The article discusses the emergence of smart swine feeding and details the benefits of the Internet of Things, automatic feeders, artificial intelligence and call feeding stations. [Read more here]. 
 

What's Coming to Instant Insights? 

 
Title: Bacterial diseases affecting pigs 
 
About the Insight 
This Insight features four peer-reviewed literature reviews on the major bacterial diseases affecting pigs. 
 
It summarises recent research on the causes and epidemiology of major bacteria, viruses and parasites found in pig production, as well as how gut function in pigs can be optimised to prevent pathogen colonisation. 
 
Publication Date: 24th May 2022 

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Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
12 May 2022 

Researchers Predict the Impact of Water Scarcity on Global Croplands 

water scarcity, water management
The agricultural sector is the largest user of water resources around the world - this includes sources of green water (rain water) and blue water (irrigation from rivers, lakes and groundwater). 
 
The global demand for water has risen drastically in the last century, with researchers suggesting this demand has grown twice as fast as the human population. Because of this, the availability of water has suffered and large majorities of the global population struggle with water scarcity. 
 
A team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China have developed a new index that they claim can be used to measure and predict both blue and green water scarcity. 
 
Using this index, the researchers were able to estimate that agricultural water scarcity will increase in more than 80% of the world's croplands by 2050. 
 
The study highlights the need to implement farming techniques which help soils retain rainwater. 
 
Read more about this study here

Important Reference Work on the Sustainable Use of Water in Agriculture 

 
Editor 
Professor Theib Oweis, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Jordan 
 
Key Features 
• Comprehensive review of the range of water resources, from groundwater and surface water to rainwater, floodwater and waste water 
• Discusses advances in irrigation techniques, from surface irrigation to micro/drip irrigation and fertigation 
• Assesses methods for optimising agricultural water use in rainfed and other systems 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

New Open Access Chapter! 

 
Authors 
Urs Schaffner, CABI, Switzerland; Heinz Müller-Schärer, University of Fribourg, Switzerland; and Andreas Lüscher, Agroscope, Switzerland 
 
About the Chapter 
This chapter describes the current status of integrated weed management (IWM) for grasslands. Its focus is on management practices available to influence transitions in a weed’s life cycle: from the soil seed bank to seedling establishment, from the seedling stage to the mature plant, and from the mature plant to the soil seed bank. 
 

News 

GMO crops, GMO wheat
Genetically-modified wheat approved for consumption 
 
Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) have recently approved a genetically-modified (GMO) variety of wheat for human consumption in Australia and New Zealand. FSANZ have approved the import of IND-004127 - a variety of wheat genetically-modified to offset damage caused by drought and a particular herbicide. Despite the approval for import, the nations' farmers are still unable to grow the crop. Developed by Bioceres Crop Solutions, the GMO variety has already been approved for human consumption in Argentina and Brazil. [Read more here]. 
 
soil organic carbon, SOC
Can soil organic carbon prevent the occurrence of drought? 
 
Climate change is one of agriculture's biggest challenges to date. As a result of climate change, the frequency and intensity of droughts has increased which has a direct impact on soil health. In light of this, a new article has highlighted how farmers can reduce the effects of climate change and soil erosion simply by improving their on-farm soil organic carbon levels. Farmers can maintain soil nutrient levels whilst also meeting crop yield targets by storing carbon beneath the earth's surface (soil carbon sequestration). [Read more here]. 
 
pest management, crop protection
New tool aims to improve on-farm pest management 
 
A new tool has been developed by an Australian-based research and extension company to help the nation's cereal and grain growers make more informed decisions on pesticide use. The tool takes on the form of a toxicity table which shows growers the impact of the most commonly used pesticides on key groups of beneficial insects that play a role in the more natural control of harmful insect pests. The need for more natural insect pest control has emerged as a result of the need to minimise the environmental impact of pesticides. [Read more here]. 
 
wearable technologies, agtech
Latest development in wearable technologies 
 
In recent years, the livestock sector has seen a rapid emergence in the adoption of wearable technologies as a means of monitoring animal health and welfare. However, the same can't be said for the crop sector, until now. An international team of researchers have developed a wearable sensor for plant leaves that can monitor a plant's water levels and notify growers if and when a plant is experiencing drought stress. The wearable technology wirelessly transmits data to a mobile application in real-time. [Read more here]. 
 

In Case You Missed It... 

 
Editor 
Professor Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark 
 
About the Book 
This book provides an authoritative review of the latest developments in integrated weed management (IWM) and covers new research on understanding weed ecology as a basis for more sustainable control, as well as developments in technology to better target IWM techniques. 
 
This collection also offers examples of how advances are being applied in practice for particular crops. 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
5 May 2022 

Using Technology to Interpret and Analyse Pig's Emotions 

swine health, pig emotions, pig welfare
With growing concern from consumers and regulatory agencies about the welfare of farmed animals such as pigs, the livestock sector must assess how animal welfare can be improved. 
 
A team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark are in the process of developing an automated emotion recognition tool which they claim can improve on-farm pig welfare. 
 
To form the foundations of the technology, researchers collected and utilised previous recordings of pig vocalisations from several stressful scenarios, including vocalisations of piglets being castrated with anaesthesia or pain relief. 
 
In addition to this, the study also included the collection of more positive vocalisations which were recorded when piglets were exposed to safe, interactive environments with bedding and toys. 
 
Using their findings, the researchers suggest that they can develop an autonomous monitoring system which can notify farmers when their pigs are experiencing negative or positive emotions. 
 
Read more about this new study here

Key Reference Reviews Using Behaviour as a Determinant for Pig Welfare 

Editor 
Emerita Professor Sandra Edwards, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Key Features 
• Emphasises advances in understanding pig behaviour as the foundation for understanding and improving welfare 
• Comprehensive coverable of welfare issues across the value chain, covering breeding and gestation, farrowing and lactation, weaning, growing and finishing as well as transport, lairage and slaughter 
• Particular focus on ways of assessing and reducing pain in such areas as tail docking and castration 

Editor Announcement 

We're delighted to delighted that Professor Jason Ross has agreed to edit our forthcoming collection: ‘Advances in pig breeding and reproduction'. 
 
Dr Ross is the Lloyd L. Anderson Endowed Professor in Physiology in the Department of Animal Science at Iowa State University, USA. In addition, Professor Ross is the Director of the Iowa Pork Industry Center, supporting one of the leading hog-producing states in the USA. 
 
Find out more about our new editor here

News 

dairy cattle, mastitis
Which factors influence a cow's response to mastitis treatment? 
 
A new article published by Dairy Global has provided a greater insight into the factors which can contribute to the failure of treating mastitis. Failure of mastitis treatment is a common problem throughout the dairy industry, however a greater understanding of the factors that can affect the efficacy of the treatment can minimise the risk of treatment failure. Key factors that can impact treatment success rate include: breed, age and overall health of the cow, as well as more generalised nutritional and environmental factors. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mastitis in dairy cattle 
animal proteins, PAPs
Processed animal proteins included in European poultry feed 
 
In the European Union (EU), the use of processed animal proteins (PAP) for inclusion in animal diets was banned in 2001 following the severe outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. However, this ban was amended last year to allow the inclusion of PAPs and insects in feed for non-ruminant farmed animals, including poultry and pigs. A new article has highlighted the recent rise in European feed producers utilising pig derived PAPs as part of poultry diets. [Read more here]. 
 
pigs, ASF, vaccine
African swine fever vaccine closer to receiving regulatory approval 
 
Scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) - which is part of the United States Department of Agriculture - have developed a vaccine they claim to prevent the development of the globally devastating disease African swine fever (ASF). Just this week the ARS have shared the news that the vaccine has successfully passed a crucial safety test required to achieve regulatory approval. This safety test is required to demonstrate that application of the vaccine will not incur a reversion to virulence, meaning that any weakened forms of the virus in the vaccine will not revert to its original, damaging state.  
[Read more here]. 
 
dairy cow welfare, animal welfare
Committee calls for a proposed code of welfare for dairy cows 
 
The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC), New Zealand have proposed minimum standard and code of best practice changes to the current dairy code which has not been updated since its creation in 2008. The Chair of the NAWAC - Gwyneth Verkerk - has called upon the general public to partake in key discussions surrounding the use of electricity to manage animal behaviour, body condition scoring, intensive winter grazing, as well as other major welfare concerns. In addition to this, NAWAC have since announced that all existing pastoral codes were being reviewed. [Read more here]. 
 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

Coming Soon! 

 
Editor 
Professor Daniel Berckmans, Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium 
 
About the Book 
The book provides a comprehensive review of the recent advances in the development of precision livestock technologies that use continuous, automated, real-time monitoring of animal traits to improve health, welfare and behaviour. 
 
The collection tackles the major issues faced by the dairy sector and how precision livestock farming technologies can decrease the likelihood of such diseases occurring. 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
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Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
5 May 2022 

New Study Compares the Efficacy of Leading Biostimulants 

biostimulants, crop nutrition
Biostimulants can enhance crop production through stimulating the crop's natural plant processes. The application of biostimulants in the horticultural sector has been substantial, however their application to hydroponically-grown crops (particularly lettuce) is still extremely limited. 
 
With this in mind, a team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China recently conducted a greenhouse trial in which they set out to determine the efficacy of certain biostimulants when applied to hydroponically-grown lettuce. 
 
The researchers utilised two lettuce cultivars (butterhead and red oak-leaf) and applied: 
 
• A half-strength modified Hoagland solution (Hs-H) 
• A full-strength Hoagland solution (Fs-H) 
• A modified Hoagland solution supplemented with 50mg L-1 fulvic acid 
• A modified Hoagland solution supplemented with 334mg L-1 seaweed extract 
• A modified Hoagland solution supplemented with 5 mL L-1 gamma polyglutamic acid 
 
Read more about this new study here

Discover the First Comprehensive Review of Key Advances in Biostimulant Research 

 
Editors 
Youssef Rouphael, Patrick du Jardin, Patrick Brown, Stefania De Pascale and Giuseppe Colla 
 
About the Book 
This book provides a comprehensive review of the key advances in understanding and using biostimulants. 
 
This collection also covers the major groups of biostimulants, from humic substances and seaweed extracts to protein hydrolysates and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), as well as the practical application of biostimulants in areas such as enhancing nutrient use efficiency (NUE). 
Open Access 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 
 
Discover the full range of OA chapters here. 

News 

bayer crop science, arable, agtech, crop sensors
Bayer and Arable partner on new project 
 
Earlier this week, Bayer announced a new partnership with Arable - a global agtech company responsible for developing crop sensors and monitoring systems. Through the partnership, both parties hope to improve their current understanding of the role of hyper-local weather conditions on seed performance. The project will utilise Arable's field-level sensing and monitoring platform which is equipped with the ability to collect real-time data on weather, plant and soil conditions. [Read more here]. 
 
insect populations, climate change
Warming climate responsible for reduction in insect populations 
 
A team of researchers from University College London, UK have dedicated a new study to assessing the impact of a warming climate coupled on the global insect populations. Findings from the study detail that climate change, coupled with intensive agriculture is responsible for a 49% reduction in insect populations in the areas of the world which have been most impacted by the effects of climate change. The findings emphasise the need to preserve natural habitats. 
[Read more here]. 
 
barley, GMO crops
Genetically-modified barley trial given the go ahead 
 
The UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs have recently approved the National Institute of Agricultural Botany's (NIAB) request to complete a set of field trials involving genetically-modified barley crops. Scientists working at NIAB have genetically modified a particular barley variety to boost its levels of the NSP2 gene. In doing so, the scientists will investigate whether enhancing this gene can reduce the need for synthetic fertilisers. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Genome editing of barley 
sustainable agriculture, regenerative farming
New centre for sustainable agriculture opened by BASF 
 
BASF - a globally-recognised chemical producer has unveiled their brand new Centre for Sustainable Agriculture in the United States this week. The centre will be used as an information hub that can be visited by farmers, students and members of the general public wishing to know more about the role of technology and innovation in driving sustainable agriculture forwards. The centre will showcase current leading technologies and practices adopted by the nation's farmers to contribute to a more sustainable future. [Read more here]. 
 

Our Latest Publication! 

 
Editor 
Professor Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark 
 
About the Book 
This book provides an authoritative review of the latest developments in integrated weed management (IWM) and covers new research on understanding weed ecology as a basis for more sustainable control, as well as developments in technology to better target IWM techniques. 
 
This collection also offers examples of how advances are being applied in practice for particular crops. 

We're Exhibiting at CEA 4.0 2022! 

CEA 4.0 2022
The 2022 virtual edition of the Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) 4.0 conference is set to take place over the course of two weeks. 
 
Day 1 of the conference and exhibition will take place on Friday 6th May and will feature sessions on: 
 
• Developing policies and its integration into indoor farming 
• Making indoor farming economics work 
• Total controlled environment agriculture 
• Greenhouse solutions 
 
Whereas Day 2 will take place on Friday 13th May and will feature sessions on: 
 
• Driving the circular economy forwards 
• International farming projects 
• Innovations in technologies and research 
• Robotics and AI 
 
Register for your ticket here
Receive an insight into the key research surrounding vertical farming 
 
Key Features 
• Describes and evaluates the technologies and methods used for growing edible plants indoors 
• Explores the benefits of utilising plant factories with artificial lighting 
• Assesses the recent advances in hydroponic technologies, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of their use 

Title Insights 

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2022 Catalogue
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Instant Insights 2022 Catalogue
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