NEWSLETTERS 
Co-Founders Rob Burleigh and Francis Dodds share their knowledge and insights into agricultural science, publishing and the latest news at Burleigh Dodds 
To keep up to date with the release of new titles and business announcements, register for our weekly video newsletters. 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
04 November 2021 

UN Climate Change Conference UK 2021 

UN Climate Change Conference UK 2021
The 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) began this week in Glasgow, UK and will run until 12th November 2021. 
 
The summit aims to bring together several international parties to accelerate the achievement of goals previously outlined in the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. 
 
In this week's newsletter, we're providing our audience with a short recap of the biggest agriculture-related developments the summit has seen so far. 

What Have We Learned From COP26 So Far? 

• Several world leaders have pledged to end deforestation by 2030 
• US and EU determined to reduce methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030 - over 100 countries similarly join this pledge 
• By 2023, many UK firms to be forced to disclose how they intend to meet climate change targets and contribute to achieving net-zero by 2050 
• New partnership between the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US announced to drive investment towards innovation and development across the agricultural sector 
 
Read on below for more on these key developments

World Leaders Call to End Deforestation by 2030 

deforestation, climate change, sustainability
In the first major breakthrough of the summit, the leaders of over 100 countries have signed a pledge which will see the end of deforestation by 2030. 
 
The countries who have signed the pledge so far are suggested to house around 85% of the world's forests. These countries include the likes of Russia, Canada, the US and UK, as well as Brazil - a country which has seen the destruction of large parts of the Amazon rainforest. 
 
The pledge will see around £14 billion accrued in public and private funds, with significant amounts already being dedicated to supporting developing countries to restore damaged land impacted by climate change related events, e.g. wildfires. 
 
As well as including the support of some of the world's leaders, the pledge to end deforestation has also been supported by leading international financial companies who have pledged to end any future investment in activities and programs which involve deforestation. 
 
Read more about this monumental development here

Key References On Protecting Our Forests 

US and EU Pledge to Reduce Methane Emissions by 30% 

livestock emissions, GHG emissions, sustainable agriculture
The second day of the COP26 summit saw the announcement of a global partnership between the US and the EU to reduce methane emissions by 30% by 2030. 
 
The announcement of this partnership was made by US President Joe Biden alongside the EU Commission Chief, Ursula von der Leyen and already has the support of over 100 countries who have signed the pledge. 
 
Methane is one of the most harmful greenhouse gases and is suggested to be solely responsible for around a third of current global warming activities exacerbated by human activities and involvement. 
 
It's been suggested that agriculture may account for up to 24% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports also highlighting the impact of livestock production as a major source of non-CO2 emissions. 
 
For many, including von der Leyen, reducing methane emissions is a huge step towards achieving net zero by 2050 - something that the COP26 summit have outlined as a key goal that must be achieved to mitigate the effects of climate change. 
 
Despite heralding support from over 100 countries, the pledge is yet to be signed by some of the world's largest emitters of methane. 
 
Read more about the pledge here

Important Titles Tackling Agriculture's Contribution to Climate Change 

Partnership Launched to Drive Innovation in the Agricultural Sector 

COP26, data innovation
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US have announced a new multi-billion dollar initiative to drive climate innovation in the agricultural sector. 
 
The announcement of the initiative, formerly known as The Agriculture Innovation Mission for Climate (AIM for Climate), was made on Tuesday at the COP26 summit. 
 
This joint initiative is the first of its kind and has support from over 30 countries, including the UK and Canada, as well as several internationally renowned non-governmental agencies, such as The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). 
 
The initiative recognises the integral role investing in climate-smart agriculture has in the global mission of tackling climate change, as well as ensuring food security for millions. 
 
AIM for Climate hopes to inspire greater investment in climate smart agricultural practices which can ensure agriculture becomes a part of the solution to the global climate crisis as opposed to an exacerbator. 
 
Read more about this new initiative here

Key Titles Channelling Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture 

Discover More Content on Climate-Smart Agriculture 

 
Agriculture is a significant contributor to climate change. Greater research and collaboration is required to tackle this increasing issue. 
 
Our extensive range of content on sustainable agricultural practices, which includes contributions from some of the world's most renowned researchers in agricultural science, can be used as a knowledge base to help further research and tackle one of agriculture's biggest challenges to date. 
 
Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
04 November 2021 

UN Climate Change Conference UK 2021 

UN Climate Change Conference UK 2021
The 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) began this week in Glasgow, UK and will run until 12th November 2021. 
 
The summit aims to bring together several international parties to accelerate the achievement of goals previously outlined in the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. 
 
In this week's newsletter, we're providing our audience with a short recap of the biggest agriculture-related developments the summit has seen so far. 

What Have We Learned From COP26 So Far? 

• Several world leaders have pledged to end deforestation by 2030 
• US and EU determined to reduce methane emissions by at least 30% by 2030 - over 100 countries similarly join this pledge 
• By 2023, many UK firms to be forced to disclose how they intend to meet climate change targets and contribute to achieving net-zero by 2050 
• New partnership between the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US announced to drive investment towards innovation and development across the agricultural sector 
 
Read on below for more on these key developments

World Leaders Call to End Deforestation by 2030 

deforestation, climate change, sustainability
In the first major breakthrough of the summit, the leaders of over 100 countries have signed a pledge which will see the end of deforestation by 2030. 
 
The countries who have signed the pledge so far are suggested to house around 85% of the world's forests. These countries include the likes of Russia, Canada, the US and UK, as well as Brazil - a country which has seen the destruction of large parts of the Amazon rainforest. 
 
The pledge will see around £14 billion accrued in public and private funds, with significant amounts already being dedicated to supporting developing countries to restore damaged land impacted by climate change related events, e.g. wildfires. 
 
As well as including the support of some of the world's leaders, the pledge to end deforestation has also been supported by leading international financial companies who have pledged to end any future investment in activities and programs which involve deforestation. 
 
Read more about this monumental development here

Key References On Protecting Our Forests 

US and EU Pledge to Reduce Methane Emissions by 30% 

livestock emissions, GHG emissions, sustainable agriculture
The second day of the COP26 summit saw the announcement of a global partnership between the US and the EU to reduce methane emissions by 30% by 2030. 
 
The announcement of this partnership was made by US President Joe Biden alongside the EU Commission Chief, Ursula von der Leyen and already has the support of over 100 countries who have signed the pledge. 
 
Methane is one of the most harmful greenhouse gases and is suggested to be solely responsible for around a third of current global warming activities exacerbated by human activities and involvement. 
 
It's been suggested that agriculture may account for up to 24% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports also highlighting the impact of livestock production as a major source of non-CO2 emissions. 
 
For many, including von der Leyen, reducing methane emissions is a huge step towards achieving net zero by 2050 - something that the COP26 summit have outlined as a key goal that must be achieved to mitigate the effects of climate change. 
 
Despite heralding support from over 100 countries, the pledge is yet to be signed by some of the world's largest emitters of methane. 
 
Read more about the pledge here

Important Titles Tackling Agriculture's Contribution to Climate Change 

Partnership Launched to Drive Innovation in the Agricultural Sector 

COP26, data innovation
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US have announced a new multi-billion dollar initiative to drive climate innovation in the agricultural sector. 
 
The announcement of the initiative, formerly known as The Agriculture Innovation Mission for Climate (AIM for Climate), was made on Tuesday at the COP26 summit. 
 
This joint initiative is the first of its kind and has support from over 30 countries, including the UK and Canada, as well as several internationally renowned non-governmental agencies, such as The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). 
 
The initiative recognises the integral role investing in climate-smart agriculture has in the global mission of tackling climate change, as well as ensuring food security for millions. 
 
AIM for Climate hopes to inspire greater investment in climate smart agricultural practices which can ensure agriculture becomes a part of the solution to the global climate crisis as opposed to an exacerbator. 
 
Read more about this new initiative here

Key Titles Channelling Sustainability and Innovation in Agriculture 

Discover More Content on Climate-Smart Agriculture 

 
Agriculture is a significant contributor to climate change. Greater research and collaboration is required to tackle this increasing issue. 
 
Our extensive range of content on sustainable agricultural practices, which includes contributions from some of the world's most renowned researchers in agricultural science, can be used as a knowledge base to help further research and tackle one of agriculture's biggest challenges to date. 
 
Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
28 October 2021 

New Title Explores Achieving Durable Disease Resistance in Cereals 

Edited by 
Professor Richard Oliver, formerly Curtin University, Australia 
 
About the Book 
This collection provides an authoritative review of key advances, from better understanding of pathogen biology/epidemiology and plant-pathogen interactions, to identifying sources of resistance and advances in techniques for breeding new varieties. 
 
The book offers a comprehensive review of research on achieving durable resistance to diseases such as leaf rust, Fusarium head blight, Septoria tritici blotch, Septoria nodorum blotch, tan spot, blast, barley yellow dwarf virus and Ramularia. 
Receive 25% off the book using code OCT25 when you shop via the website.  
Code expires 31st October 2021. 

Celebrating Open Access! 

Open Access Week International
International Open Access Week 2021 is officially underway and will be celebrated until 31st October! 
 
Visit the Open Access Week website to learn more about Open Access (OA), key events taking place internationally this week and to read the testimonies of those advancing the adoption of OA across the globe! 

Discover our OA Chapters... 

We're delighted to have over 25 chapters now published under Open Access (OA) licensing agreements. 
 
We have chapters covering the major themes across crop and livestock science, including: 
• The use of CRISPR gene editing technologies in precision crop breeding 
• The contribution of breeding to the environmental impact of livestock production 
Major diseases affecting wheat and other cereals 
Calling All BDS Authors 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 

News 

tar spot, maize
Tackling tar spot in maize crops across the United States 
 
A new research initiative, which includes researchers from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), has been announced to assist US farmers in their mission to tackle tar spot - an emerging disease of maize. Tar spot can reduce maize yields significantly, with estimates of around 20-60 bushels lost per acre. The scientists working on the new project are exploring opportunities for developing crops with resistance to the disease.  
[Read more here]. 
 
crop yields, robotics
Boosting crop yields using robotics 
 
Edete Precision Technologies for Agriculture - an agri-tech startup based in Israel - have recently completed a piloted trial of their new robotic pollinator on a pistachio orchard in California, USA. The pollinator was used in conjunction with wind pollination as a supplement in hopes of boosting crop yield. The orchard recorded a 24% increase in yield, which if replicated by other orchards, would equal an additional $1850 in income for the average US pistachio grower per acre. [Read more here]. 
 
smallholder farmers
Benin's smallholder farmers receive boost with new funding 
 
The Agri-Business Capital Fund (ABC) have invested around $1.8 million into Benin based organisation Union Nationale des Caisses Rurales d'Epargne et de Prêt. (UNACREP). UNACREP offers great support to the nation's smallholder population, offering short and long term loans to to their member network which now sits at over 130,000 members. The funding received by the ABC Fund will ensure UNACREP can continue to provide smallholder farmers with the means to produce efficiently whilst making a profit. [Read more here]. 
 
high crop yields, IPM
Retaining high crop yield with IPM strategies 
 
A new study completed by researchers from Purdue University, USA has demonstrated that the implementation of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies can reduce insecticide applications by 95%, whilst also maintaining (or enhancing) crop yield through pollinator conservation. With growing concerns around the environmental impact of pesticides and insecticides, the study's findings become that bit more important in advocating for the adoption of more sustainable farming practices. [Read more here]. 
 

Limited Time Discount - Only 3 Days Left! 

Save 25% on ALL titles for a limited time! Simply enter code* OCT25 at checkout via our website to receive this discount! 
 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse through over 100 titles that are included in this discount! 
 
*Please note: Code expires 31st October 2021. 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
28 October 2021 

Latest Breakthrough in Tackling Bovine Respiratory Disease 

bovine respiratory disease, dairy cattle health
Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a general term used by veterinarians and those working with animals for respiratory diseases caused by both viral and bacterial pathogens. It is a major cause of economic loss for many dairy and beef farmers across the globe. 
 
Individual factors such as poor health and environmental stress can increase the likelihood of young calves developing bacterial infections which lead to BRD. Pneumonia in calves is one of the most prevalent diseases that can occur, and one that costs around £43 per calf to treat. 
 
A team of researchers from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) are tackling BRD at the source and have identified the proteins within the bacteria that's associated with the development of BRD. 
 
These findings have already been suggested as evidence to develop possible intervention strategies against the disease. 
 
Find out more about this new research here

New Book Reviews Improvements to Dairy Herd Health 

Edited by 
Professor Emeritus Émile Bouchard, University of Montreal, Canada 
 
About the Book 
This collection reviews key challenges in dairy herd health management, such as effective monitoring and diagnosis of infectious diseases, as well as recent developments in areas such as disease prevention and disease surveillance. 
 
It also reviews herd health management (HHM) issues across the dairy cow life cycle, from reproduction and calf health to the transition stage and replacement of stock as well as the successful implementation of HHM programmes in specific instances, from maintaining udder and hoof health, to preventing metabolic disorders, bacterial and viral diseases, as well as parasitic infections. 
Receive 25% off the book using code OCT25 when you shop via the website.  
Code expires 31st October 2021. 

Celebrating Open Access! 

Open Access Week International
International Open Access Week 2021 is officially underway and will be celebrated until 31st October! 
 
Visit the Open Access Week website to learn more about Open Access (OA), key events taking place internationally this week and to read the testimonies of those advancing the adoption of OA across the globe! 

Discover our OA Chapters... 

We're delighted to have over 25 chapters now published under Open Access (OA) licensing agreements. 
 
We have chapters covering the major themes across crop and livestock science, including: 
• The use of CRISPR gene editing technologies in precision crop breeding 
• The contribution of breeding to the environmental impact of livestock production 
Major diseases affecting wheat and other cereals 
Calling All BDS Authors 
 
Are you currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter for consideration? If yes, are you interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA)? 
 
Contact Us to discuss the options available. 

News 

avian influenza, AI, poultry
New outbreak of avian influenza in The Netherlands 
 
The Netherlands' Ministry of Agriculture has confirmed a recent outbreak of H5 avian influenza (AI) on a poultry farm in the region of Zeewolde. The farm holds around 36,000 hens, of which all will be culled as part of the country's existing biosecurity measures. As a result of this outbreak, the Dutch government have announced a compulsory housing order for all commercially held poultry as of 26th October. There is no confirmed end date for this order yet. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Viruses affecting poultry 
 
beef, heat stress
Reducing the occurrence of heat stress in beef cattle 
 
A team of researchers from the University of Florida, USA are working together to tackle the issue of heat stress in beef cattle. Heat stress is known to restrict animal performance, impact health and incur losses of around $1.2 billion for the US livestock sectors. The new study looks to assess the impact of heat stress on pregnant beef cattle, primarily their ability to reproduce after exposure to this stress, and whether these effects can be mitigated to meet the rising global demand for beef.  
[Read more here]. 
 
soybean meal, SBM, pig feed
Latest alternative to soybean meal in pig feed 
 
For the past month, Pig Progress have been running a series of articles on the 'top five' alternatives to soybean meal. The final article in this series is on the use of single-cell proteins (SCP), for example growing yeast, bacteria or microalgae. SCPs are already being utilised in the aquaculture market for feed purposes, however the livestock sector remain coy about its use, primarily due to concerns about the cost of its production.  
[Read more here]. 
 
poultry welfare, poultry health
Taiwan takes monumental step in securing poultry welfare 
 
Just this week, the Taiwanese government have passed a legislation which makes it compulsory for egg producers to label their packaging with the production system used to produce the eggs. This legislation comes as a result of new food traceability regulations which are put in place to improve customer knowledge and awareness of where their food comes from. This new legislation will see egg boxes stamped with a letter which will denote the housing system in which the bird was reared in. [Read more here]. 
 

Limited Time Discount - Only 3 Days Left! 

Save 25% on ALL titles for a limited time! Simply enter code* OCT25 at checkout via our website to receive this discount! 
 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse through over 100 titles that are included in this discount! 
 
*Please note: Code expires 31st October 2021. 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
21 October 2021 
Flash Sale! 
 
Save 25% on ALL titles for a limited time! 
 
Enter code OCT25 at checkout via our website to receive this discount! 
 
Code expires 31st October 2021. 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse through over 100 titles that are included in this discount! 
 
Save 25% on popular titles, including: 
 

Another Step Towards Achieving Sustainable Agriculture? 

sustainable farming, biological control
A new partnership between Chr. Hansen and UPL has been announced that will provide farmers with sustainable alternatives to conventional agricultural products. 
 
Biological solutions for optimising plant health and performance are growing in demand, with more and more farmers and producers seeking to implement sustainable farming practices. 
 
The development of biological solutions, including biostimulants, biopesticides and bioprotectants, has been recognised as an integral part of the global mission of achieving sustainable agriculture, whilst increasing farmers' yield and productivity. 
 
This new partnership will see Chr. Hansen develop new biological products and improve existing ones, whereas UPL's role will focus around the registering and commercialisation of these new products. 
 
Read more about this new partnership here

Discover Our Collection of Titles on Biosolutions 

Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing

Coming in November! 

Edited by 
Dr Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands and Dr Willem J. Ravensberg, Koppert Biological Systems, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
This book provides a comprehensive coverage of the recent advances in the development of more ecologically balanced biological methods to control plant diseases. 
 
The collection offers a focussed review on the availability and use of bacterial, fungal and viral bioprotectants, as well as the issues that arise with their development and use. 

News 

seed science, sustainable agriculture, pollinators
Recognising the importance of pollinators for seed production 
 
A team of researchers from Stellenbosch University, South Africa, led by Dr James Rodger, have recently completed a study which revealed just how dependent plant species are on animal pollinators to produce seeds. The new research has suggested that without animal pollinators, around 175,000 plant species would either produce no seeds at all, or face an 80% reduction in fertility. This new study comes at a time where reports of a decline in pollinators have been announced. [Read more here]. 
 
greenhouse sector, ornamental plants
Supporting the cultivation of ornamental plants in Spain 
 
The European Commission have granted €120 million to Spain to help rebuild, modernise and transform the country's existing greenhouse sector. The funding scheme will allow for growers and farmers of vegetables, cut flowers and ornamental plants to stay up-to-date with the latest technologies available to assist with growing, whilst also improving yields and productivity where possible. The scheme has received funding through the Recovery and Resilience Plan and is set to last until December 2023. 
[Read more here]. 
 
IoT, horticultural industry
Horticulture industry to benefit from IoT technology 
 
Internet of Things (IoT) is a growing premise across the agricultural sector and beyond. However, many farmers and producers within the horticulture industry remain cautious of implementing IoT into their daily farming practices. A new article published by Hortidaily has explored how members of the horticulture industry can benefit from the IoT technology, primarily through the use of automation and robotics to help assist with tasks such as fruit picking. [Read more here]. 
 
soybean crop, soybean cyst nematode
New partnership for tackling the soybean cyst nematode 
 
BASF and the Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN) Coalition have joined forces to create the first SCN Action Month for October. The new action month has come into force as a result of a recent spike of occurrences of sudden death syndrome as a result of the SCN. Both BASF and the SCN Coalition hope that the launch of this special month will raise awareness of SCN and its accompanying symptoms, whilst also improving access to resources for farmers and producers tackling the pest.  
[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Nematode pathogens of soybean 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
21 October 2021 
Flash Sale! 
 
Save 25% on ALL titles for a limited time! 
 
Enter code OCT25 at checkout via our website to receive this discount! 
 
Code expires 31st October 2021. 
Download our 2021 Catalogue and browse through over 100 titles that are included in this discount! 
 
Save 25% on popular titles, including: 
 

Making Dairy Farming More Sustainable Across Europe 

dairy farming, sustainable dairy farming
Recent IPCC reports have highlighted the environmental impact of livestock production as a major source of non-CO₂ emissions: methane (CH₄), nitrous oxide (N₂O) and ammonia (NH₃). 
 
The livestock sector must react to these reports and develop or implement methods that can reduce greenhouse (GHG) emissions from livestock production and ultimately improve the sustainability of the livestock sector. 
 
A new research project - Pathways - has set out to do just that and has over 28 partners from throughout Europe involved, with representatives from both industry and academia. 
 
Pathways has received just over €9 million from the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation which is set to be used to set up practice hubs across the continent. These hubs will allow for project partners, farmers and other stakeholders across the agricultural supply chain to tackle key issues and challenges they face whilst attempting to increase dairy farm sustainability. 
 
Read the full article here

Key Reference on Tackling GHG Emissions in Livestock Production 

Edited by 
Dr Richard Baines, Royal Agricultural University, UK 
 
Key Features 
• A comprehensive review of both the causes of greenhouse gas emissions from livestock and the range of ways these emissions can be reduced 
• Particularly strong focus on the range of nutritional strategies, from forage and silage to feed supplements such as plant bioactive compounds and direct-fed microbials as well as inhibitors and vaccines 
• Covers other approaches such as genetics and selection, improved husbandry as well as manure management 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

liveborn piglets, piglet welfare, piglet health
Improving the rate of liveborn piglets in gilts 
 
New research from Nedap - the world's leading farming automation company - has suggested that gilts who gain a sufficient amount of weight during the gestation period will produce a larger, more successful litter with more piglets born alive. The study used a management system called Porcitec to analyse the data of 3000 sows from a pig farm in Spain. The data similarly reports that gilts who increased body weight by 30kg were likely to produce less live piglets than gilts who gained 60-90kg. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Welfare of gilts and pregnant sows 
chicken welfare, animal welfare, non-beak tipped flocks
Ensuring the welfare of non beak-tipped flocks 
 
A Welsh farmer - Richard Jones - has embraced the momentous challenge of managing flocks which have not undergone beak tipping. Beak tipping is a process which involves the trimming of a bird's beak using infra-red light technology to avoid any future occurrences of injurious pecking and other major welfare concerns. To avoid events like these from happening, Richard implements a strict schedule which includes a variety of enrichment activities, distractions and additional vitamins.  
[Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Feather-pecking in poultry 
banana peel, silage, ruminants
Using banana peel as silage for ruminants 
 
Bananas are the world’s most popular fruit and the fourth most important crop in the developing world after rice, wheat and maize. With this in mind, considerable amounts of banana peels are generated – and many usually end up in our compost heaps. However, an article by Dairy Global has explored the premise of reusing banana peels as silage for ruminants. Bananas are known to have several attributes which contribute to good human (and animal) health. [Read more here]. 
 
 
lameness, dairy cattle welfare
New practice for preventing lameness in dairy cows 
 
A new joint venture between Kingston Maurward College, UK and Wessex Internet is improving the identification of lameness in dairy cattle through the use of cameras and face recognition. Instead of relying on tags for identification, the farm has a camera in place that recognises each cow by the shape and colour patterns visible on their heads. The camera will note any subtle changes in movement, and if they continue, the camera will flag these as a potential case of lameness. [Read more here]. 
 

What's New to Instant Insights? 

This collection features three peer-reviewed literature reviews on pre- and probiotics in poultry production. 
 
Chapters summarise the safety and efficacy of individual monocultures for prophylactic and/or therapeutic efficacy against Salmonella infections in poultry under both laboratory and field conditions, as well as current concerns surrounding the application of probiotics in poultry production. 
 
Publication Date: September 2021 
Pages: 100 
Price: £37.99 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
14 October 2021 

ACI's Biostimulants Europe 2021 Conference 

Biostimulants Europe 2021
The global and European biostimulants market has seen significant growth over the past few years. With the increased direction from the authorities and growing demand for sustainable agriculture, this shows that the biostimulants market will continue to experience remarkable growth. 
 
Biostimulants Europe 2021 will bring together key industry stakeholders from the biostimulants industry to give insights into the current challenges being faced and what opportunities lie ahead. 
 
The summit will also provide a market overview, with highlights from experts on the progression of the biostimulants market and new insights and innovation of projects in the pipeline. 
 
View the conference agenda here
Exclusive Discount 
 
We're extremely delighted to be a Media Partner at the event, and even more excited to be able to offer our subscribers an exclusive saving on registration! 
 
Contact Rohan Baryah and quote code CBSe4_15MKT to receive this discount. 

First Comprehensive Review of Key Advances in Biostimulant Research 

Edited by 
Youssef Rouphael, Patrick du Jardin, Patrick Brown, Stefania De Pascale and Giuseppe Colla 
 
About the Book 
This collection provides a comprehensive review of the key advances in understanding and using biostimulants. 
 
The book covers the major groups of biostimulants, from humic substances and seaweed extracts to protein hydrolysates and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), as well as the practical application of biostimulants in areas such as enhancing nutrient use efficiency (NUE). 

Improving Detection of Food Fraud 

food fraud, food contamination, food safety
The occurrence of fraudulent practices - or food fraud - in food production has steadily risen in recent years and is claimed to cause billions of dollars in economic damage every year. 
 
A team of researchers from the University of Basel, Switzerland have developed a low-cost approach to detecting food fraud. The model developed is equipped with the ability to determine the true origin of food in a quick and cost effective manner. 
 
Within the food industry, there are specific items that are grown or made in specific regions that consumers demand, for example authentic olive oil from Italy. These items tend to have a much higher market value than olive oil from other countries. This price differentiation is arguably one of the main reasons as to why food fraud in a geographical sense is committed. 
 
The new model has been developed by a leading researcher at the University of Basel, alongside a team at Agroisolab GmbH who trialled the model on a dataset of European strawberries collected across 11 years. 
 
Read the full article here

Forthcoming Reference on Ensuring Safety and Quality in the Agri-food Supply Chain 

Edited by 
Professor Louise Manning, Royal Agricultural University, UK 
 
Key Features 
• Highlights current issues that challenge the safety of agri-food supply chains 
• Assesses the recent developments implemented to improve safety and quality at all levels of the agri-food supply chain 
• Emphasis on the need for improved tracking and traceability systems of food products to prevent and manage potential threats to safety 
 
Check out two chapters from this book which have already been published as Open Access here

News 

cassava, herbicide
Tackling weeds and increasing cassava yields with new herbicide 
 
Bayer Crop Science have developed a new herbicide titled Lagon which is claimed to help farmers tackle the growing problem of cassava weeds, whilst also boosting cassava crop yield. The new herbicide has been applied in over 200 trials across Nigeria and Tanzania, with farmers rating it the most effective pre-emergence herbicide for controlling grasses and broadleaf weeds in cassava crops. [Read more here]. 
 
soybean cultivation, pesticide use
Reducing pesticide use in soybean cultivation 
 
It has been suggested that the purchase and use of pesticides account for around 30% of soybean growers' costs in Brazil. With this in mind, FarmBox - a Brazilian based company - have developed a new tool which is equipped with the ability to monitor pest and diseases. The tool will encourage farmers and producers alike to control pests using targeted strategies, include integrated pest management. [Read more here]. 
 
maize, GMO crops, GMO maize
Nigeria approve genetically modified maize 
 
Nigeria are recognised as a leading country in Africa for the adoption of crop biotechnology practices. Just this week, it was announced that the country had approved the cultivation and use of genetically modified (GMO) maize which is claimed to have an increased drought tolerance and improved levels of resistance to major pests affecting the crop, including fall armyworm and the corn borer. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Genome editing of maize 
greenhouse, horticulture
Investing in Canada's greenhouse sector 
 
Lethbridge College and Sunterra Greenhouse, Canada have partnered up in a new venture to show their support for Canada's greenhouse sector. The Canadian greenhouse sector is the fastest growing segment of Canadian horticulture, primarily due to the demand from consumers for more local food. This new venture will include an investment of around $783,000 to support the advancement of indoor growing technologies.  
[Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
14 October 2021 

Impact of Sow Lameness on Piglet Health and Welfare 

pig production, pig welfare, animal welfare
A new study led by a researcher at North Carolina State University, USA has queried the impact of sow lameness on piglet health and ultimate survival. 
 
Dr Monique Pairis-Garcia reported her findings in an article published by Pig Progress. 
 
Lameness is a common issue across the livestock sector and is particularly prevalent in pig and dairy production. Lameness is one of the many major welfare concerns as it can impact sow physiology and behaviour and can lead to experiences of pain. 
 
Dr Pairis-Garcia's new study reviewed the impacts of sow lameness on weaned piglet performance, with piglets being separated into groups dependent on the level of lameness experienced by the sow: 
 
• Group 1 = Sow had no experience of lameness 
• Group 2 = Sow experienced moderate levels of lameness 
• Group 3 = Sow experienced severe levels of lameness 
 
Read more about this new research here
Related Chapter 
 
We're delighted to have had Dr Pairis-Garcia contribute a chapter on the physiological and behavioural responses of pigs to disease to our new book on Understanding the behaviour and improving the welfare of pigs. 
 
Find out more about the chapter by clicking the link below! 

Whole Reference Work Dedicated to Improving Pig Welfare 

Edited by 
Emerita Professor Sandra Edwards, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Key Features 
• Emphasises advances in understanding pig behaviour as the foundation for understanding and improving welfare 
• Comprehensive coverable of welfare issues across the value chain, covering breeding and gestation, farrowing and lactation, weaning, growing and finishing as well as transport, lairage and slaughter 
• Particular focus on ways of assessing and reducing pain in such areas as tail docking and castration 

Improving nitrogen-use-efficiency in dairy cattle 

dairy herd health, dairy cattle, dairy welfare, nitrogen-use-efficiency
A new joint venture including two of Northern Ireland's leading animal nutrition companies has been announced this month. 
 
Trouw Nutrition Ltd and John Thompsons and Sons Ltd have partnered with the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI), also based in Northern Ireland, to identify and develop strategies which can be implemented to improve nitrogen-use-efficiency in dairy cows. 
 
It has been suggested that around only 30% of the nitrogen which is consumed by dairy cows is converted into milk protein, with the remaining excreted in the cow's manure. This nitrogen can take on the form of ammonia gas or nitrous oxide. 
 
Both ammonia and nitrous oxide can be extremely harmful to the environment. For example, ammonia gas can cause biodiversity loss, whereas nitrous oxide has a global warming potential of around 300 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. 
 
Read more about this new partnership here
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

AI, avian flu, avian influenza, poultry health
Keepers of poultry in the UK urged to prepare for AI 
 
The UK's chief veterinary officers have recommended that keepers of poultry in the UK start to prepare now for any future outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) over the winter months. With birds migrating due to cold weather, the risk of disease spread from wild birds to domestic birds naturally increases. The UK's veterinary officers have suggested poultry keepers implement strict biosecurity practices as soon as possible.  
[Read more here]. 
 
sheep health, grazing environments
Trialling new grazing environments for UK sheep 
 
A group of farmers from the UK are working in cooperation with ADAS as part of a field programme run by the Soil Association to trial grazing flocks of sheep on leys which contain areas of red clover growth. Red clover is a legume - a crop that sheep farmers tend to avoid due to the supposed impact it can have on sheep fertility. The new trial hopes to dispel any lasting fears about this, whilst also promoting the environmental benefits of using red clover. [Read more here]. 
 
dairy health, mastitis
Reducing the risk of mastitis during the dry period 
 
Mastitis is a common disease in dairy cattle which reduces milk yield and quality due to an inflammation of a cow's udder tissue. It has been suggested that the treatment and control of mastitis is one of the largest costs to the UK dairy industry. Preventing the occurrence of mastitis during the dry period is a challenge within itself. A new article has outlined the key steps farmers and producers should take to limit the potential of its occurrence. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mastitis in dairy cattle 
laying hen crossbreed, poultry breeding
New laying hen crossbreed developed in Russia 
 
A team of researchers from the All-Russian Research Institute of Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Animals have developed a new crossbreed of laying hen which has been designed to meet the criteria of the Clean Eggs standards. Clean Eggs are utilised to produce human influenza vaccines and are used to produce inactive vaccines which are then utilised throughout the international veterinary sector. [Read more here]. 
 

Forthcoming Title on Pig Gut Health 

Edited by 
Professor Mick Bailey and Emeritus Professor Chris Stokes, University of Bristol, UK 
 
About the Book 
This title offers a comprehensive coverage on the wealth of research on the porcine gastrointestinal tract, its key role in pig health and nutrition, as well as its implications for improving feed efficiency and growth. 
 
It also details how optimising the gut microbiome can contribute to an overall improvement in pig health. 
 
Publication Date: December 2021 

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Crops Round Up 
7 October 2021 

Editor Announcement 

We're delighted to announce that Professor Toyoki Kozai and Eri Hayashi have agreed to edit our forthcoming collection: Advances in plant factories: New technologies in indoor vertical farming. 
 
Professor Kozai is former President of Chiba University, Japan, where he is now Emeritus Professor. He is also Honorary President of the Japan Plant Factory Association (JPFA) and a former President of The Agricultural Academy of Japan. 
 
Eri Hayashi is Vice President of the JPFA where she is also Director of International Relations and Consulting. Eri has been Research Project Leader for a project on Artificial Intelligence- and Phenotyping-based Smart Plant Factories with Artificial Lighting (PFALs). 
 
Find out more about our new editors here

How Can We Better Protect Our Agroecosystems? 

agroecosystems, sustainable agriculture
Recent years have seen the development of a debate surrounding farmers' reliance on the use of pesticides and fertilisers to protect and enhance their crop yields. 
 
With one side arguing that agrochemical alternatives cannot produce the required crop yields needed to support the rapidly growing population, the other side emphasise the variety of dangers that the continued use of traditional agrochemicals can bring to the environment, as well as human health. 
 
The Rothamsted Research Institute, UK have brought together a team of their resident experts to tackle the main themes of the debate, discussing key elements such as: 
 
• The development of more sustainable, environmentally-friendly crop pest, weed and disease control solutions 
• The role of technology in reducing the need to use pesticides 
• The challenge of keeping soil phosphorus at an optimum 
 
Read the expert's verdict on the sector's reliance on pesticides here
 
Alternatively, read another expert's verdict on the sector's use of fertilisers here

Key Titles on the Emergence of Biocontrol Solutions 

Edited by 
Dr Jürgen Köhl, Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands and Willem J. Ravensberg, Koppert Biological Solutions, The Netherlands 
 
About the Book 
 
This collection summarises and reviews the wealth of recent research on the development of more environmentally friendly biological methods to control plant diseases. 
 
Check out some chapters from this book which have already been published as Open Access here
Edited by 
Professor Nick Birch, formerly The James Hutton Institute, UK and Professor Travis Glare, Lincoln University, New Zealand 
 
Key Features 
 
• Reviews key steps in biopesticide product development 
• Comprehensive coverage of the range of biopesticides, from microbial to natural substance-based biopesticides 
• Strong focus on pheromone and allelochemical semiochemicals as well as peptide-based biopesticides 
 
Edited by 
Youssef Rouphael, Patrick du Jardin, Patrick Brown, Stefania De Pascale and Giuseppe Colla 
 
About the Book 
Biostimulants stimulate natural processes in crops to enhance nutrient uptake, nutrient use efficiency (NUE), resistance to abiotic stress and quality traits. This collection reviews key advances in understanding and using biostimulants. 

News 

pollination services, agriculture
Greater support needed for pollination services in agriculture 
 
Pollinators are declining rapidly on a global scale. This decline threatens global food security, with pollinator species (typically bees) contributing to around 35% of the world's food production. With the potential impact monumental, many working across the sector are calling for greater support for pollinators and the services they offer. Most recently, research from the University of Göttingen, Germany has suggested that yields could be increased if the existence of pollinators was encouraged.  
[Read more here]. 
 
mycotoxins, maize
Detecting mycotoxins in maize crops 
 
A team of researchers from Embrapa, Brazil and the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil have discovered that mycotoxins in maize crops can be identified efficiently and accurately using near infrared imagery. Throughout the course of the study, the researchers were able to successfully identify F. verticillioides and F. graminearum - the two fungi most associated with the development of mycotoxins. This discovery is already being heralded as a replacement for the more expensive methods of analysis. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Insight: Mycotoxin detection and control 
food shortages, climate change, sustainable agriculture
Food shortages exacerbated by climate change 
 
Two of the UK's biggest supermarkets - Tesco and Sainsbury's - are struggling to stock their shelves with pasta due to a global shortage of durum wheat. Wheat is ground into semolina to make popular pasta types, such as spaghetti and penne. This shortage has occurred due to rising temperatures and prolonged periods of drought, as a result of climate change. Canada, who are one of the largest producers and exporters of wheat - have been hit extremely hard this summer, with their yields down by up to 50%. [Read more here]. 
 
smallholders, smallholder farming
Zambian smallholder farmers to benefit from new initiative 
 
A new initiative launched by Zanaco which has been backed by the European Union and the European Investment Bank will see smallholder farmers working in Zambia benefit from an investment of around €30 million. The initiative has been developed to support and improve the country's current rate of agricultural productivity and profitability. The €30 million investment will be utilised to generate greater financing options which can be offered to both male and female smallholder farmers. [Read more here]. 
 

Supporting Smallholder Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa 

 
Edited by 
Dr Dominik Klauser and Dr Mike Robinson, Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture, Switzerland 
 
About the Book 
This volume reviews recent research on effective support to improve smallholder livelihoods. 
 
After discussing the economics of smallholder farming, the book looks at access to key inputs before assessing ways of improving extension and other services to support sustainable production practices. 
 
Read an excerpt from the book here

Title Insights 

Burleigh Dodds Livestock Round Up 
7 October 2021 

New Bill Presented to End Cages for Laying Hens in the UK 

chicken welfare, poultry welfare, laying hens
A new bill - Beatrice's Bill - has been introduced into parliament by the UK Conservative Party which suggests outlawing cages for laying hens reared in the UK. 
 
Referencing current statistics, around 16 million hens are raised in cages in the UK every year. 
 
Advocates for the banning of cages cite the impact of caging on the physical and behavioural needs of poultry, emphasising the development of health conditions as a result of being kept in restrictive environments. 
 
As a result of the successful introduction of the bill into Parliament, several of the UK's major animal health and welfare organisations, including the Conservative Animal Welfare Foundation (CAWF) and the Human League UK, have launched their own petition calling for the government to act on this bill and ban the caging of the nation's hens. This petition already has nearly 80,000 signatures. 
 
The bill was presented and passed unopposed in the House of Commons and will face a second reading on 22nd October. 
 
Read the full story here

New Title Emphasises the Importance of Meeting Poultry Welfare Standards 

Edited by 
Professor Christine Nicol, Royal Veterinary College - University of London, UK 
 
About the Book 
This book offers a comprehensive summary on the wealth of recent research completed on understanding chicken behaviour and discusses how best to use this rich body of knowledge to optimise welfare management of broilers and layers. 
 
It features expert insights into the use of wearable, video and acoustic technologies as a means of monitoring behaviour, as well as improving current welfare protocols. 

Discover the other titles in our animal welfare series... 

 
 
Edited by Emerita Professor Sandra Edwards, Newcastle University, UK 
 
Find out more about the book here
 
 
Edited by Professor Marcia Endres, University of Minnesota, USA 
 
Discover more about the book here

Fly Larvae To Be Used An Alternative Protein Source in Pig Feed 

fly larvae, animal feed, SBM
With the price of soybean meal (SBM) steadily increasing, farmers and producers alike are seeking alternative protein sources. Recent years have seen the emergence of insects for use in animal feed. 
 
New research by scientists at Wageningen University and Research and Leiden University, The Netherlands have claimed that black solider fly larvae can be used as a more sustainable source of protein for pigs as they can be grown on waste heaps that develop as a result of food production. 
 
The study saw researchers compare the impact of pigs fed black solider fly larvae, compared to a control group who were fed SBM. The researchers identified increased levels of Bifidobacterium - a bacteria which previous research studies have reported to have positive effects on both human and animal health. 
 
Read the full article here

New Title Explores Other Alternative Protein Sources For Use In Livestock Feed 

Edited by 
Professor Xin Gen Lei, Cornell University, USA 
 
About the Book 
 
With traditional sources of protein considered as major contributors to climate change, there is growing interest in establishing alternative, more ‘climate-smart’ sources of protein. 
 
This title summarises current advances in utilising macroalgae and microalgae as alternative sources of proteins. 
 
It reviews processes of protein formation in macroalgae and microalgae, macroalgae farming and processing as well as microalgae bioprocessing. Chapters also discuss the practical application of seaweed as an alternative protein source in ruminant, pig, poultry and fish diets. 
Open Access 
 
If you're currently writing a chapter for any of our forthcoming publications, or would like to submit a chapter and are interested in the possibility of publishing it as Open Access (OA) please Contact Us to discuss the options available and the next steps. 
 
Browse our range of Open Access (OA) chapters here. 

News 

rumen development, rumen function, dairy cattle
The importance of good rumen development in dairy calves 
 
Efficient rumen function in dairy cows is integral to overall cow performance and health. However, this is arguably even more important in dairy calves as rumen function potential can be reduced significantly which can hinder cow development. With this at stake, several studies have set out to identify feed ingredients that can complement the rumen and have a positive impact on cow growth performance and rumen associated processes, e.g. rumen fermentation. [Read more here]. 
 
meat quality, pig meat
Improving the quality of pork 
 
Quality of meat incorporates the following elements: flavour, texture, colour and appearance. With consumer expectation as high as it is, producers worldwide are faced with the challenge of ensuring these quality traits are met, whilst also ensuring the welfare of the animal isn't compromised. A new article has explored how pork producers are achieving these requirements, looking primarily at the crucial role lipids play in determining whether an animal will produce high or low quality meat.  
[Read more here]. 
 
white striping, chicken
Large majority of US supermarket chicken affected by white striping 
 
A new study completed by The Humane League has determined that around 99% of all store-brand chicken sold by some of the major food superstores in the US have evidence of white striping. White striping is a muscle disease that occurs when poultry are bred for fast growth, which leads to a far higher fat content and lower protein levels when compared to a chicken bred at a more normal, natural rate. Despite not being a risk to human health, The Humane League are keen to emphasise the animal welfare issues white striping indicate. [Read more here]. 
 
BDS Related Chapter: Poultry meat quality: an overview 
carbon neutral dairy production, sustainable agriculture
Marin County, California to be carbon-neutral by 2030? 
 
A recent panel organised by the Marin Agricultural Land Trust (MALT) has determined that carbon-neutral (or carbon negative) dairy production and farming is highly achievable within the region by 2030. The panel included an array of experts from industry and academia who were able to come to the conclusion unanimously. A key discussion point was the role of seaweed-based feed and feed additives in reducing methane production in dairy cows. [Read more here]. 
 

Title Insights 

 
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